Darwin Bicentennial Celebration at UFV

For more than 20 years, Charles Darwin collected scientific data and considered the issue of how animals and plants changed over long periods of time. His most famous journey was aboard the HMS Beagle, on which he sailed around the world between 1831 and 1836. During that period, he made his now-famous stops in the Galapagos Islands, where he studied oddities such as volcanic rocks and giant tortoises. He also collected a variety of mockingbirds, which appeared to be slightly different on each island, leading him to think that they must have evolved along different paths from a common ancestor. 
 Charles Darwin 
During his career, Darwin studied mutations resulting from breeding experiments and eventually came to believe that the mechanism underlying the process of evolution was that of ‘natural selection’ or ‘survival of the fittest’. This idea led him to publish the ground-breaking book On the Origin of Species in 1859. 

UFV declared Feb 9-13 2009 Darwin Bicentennial week at the university and welcomed students, faculty, alumni, and the public to a number of activities as part of a series of events held worldwide (details at www.darwinday.org) in recognition of what would have been Darwin's 200th birthday on February 12, 2009.

Supporting materials
"Perspectives on Evolution and Creation.” Free public lecture by Dr. Barbara Moon, head of the UFV Biology department. View the presentation slides.


On March 10, 2009, Charles Darwin (aka Dr. Greg Bole, UBC zoologist, left) met his
great-great-grandson, Sir James Barlow (second from right) at UFV. They are
accompanied by Dr. Sharon Gillies (Biology faculty), second from left, and Dr. Dianne
Common, VP Academic and Provost (right).  
 
View the video of Mr. Darwin sharing his life story with the audience at UFV.
 

Darwin Bicentennial Celebration at UFV

For more than 20 years, Charles Darwin collected scientific data and considered the issue of how animals and plants changed over long periods of time. His most famous journey was aboard the HMS Beagle, on which he sailed around the world between 1831 and 1836. During that period, he made his now-famous stops in the Galapagos Islands, where he studied oddities such as volcanic rocks and giant tortoises. He also collected a variety of mockingbirds, which appeared to be slightly different on each island, leading him to think that they must have evolved along different paths from a common ancestor. 
 Charles Darwin 
During his career, Darwin studied mutations resulting from breeding experiments and eventually came to believe that the mechanism underlying the process of evolution was that of ‘natural selection’ or ‘survival of the fittest’. This idea led him to publish the ground-breaking book On the Origin of Species in 1859. 

UFV declared Feb 9-13 2009 Darwin Bicentennial week at the university and welcomed students, faculty, alumni, and the public to a number of activities as part of a series of events held worldwide (details at www.darwinday.org) in recognition of what would have been Darwin's 200th birthday on February 12, 2009.

Supporting materials
"Perspectives on Evolution and Creation.” Free public lecture by Dr. Barbara Moon, head of the UFV Biology department. View the presentation slides.


On March 10, 2009, Charles Darwin (aka Dr. Greg Bole, UBC zoologist, left) met his
great-great-grandson, Sir James Barlow (second from right) at UFV. They are
accompanied by Dr. Sharon Gillies (Biology faculty), second from left, and Dr. Dianne
Common, VP Academic and Provost (right).  
 
View the video of Mr. Darwin sharing his life story with the audience at UFV.
 

Darwin Bicentennial Celebration at UFV

For more than 20 years, Charles Darwin collected scientific data and considered the issue of how animals and plants changed over long periods of time. His most famous journey was aboard the HMS Beagle, on which he sailed around the world between 1831 and 1836. During that period, he made his now-famous stops in the Galapagos Islands, where he studied oddities such as volcanic rocks and giant tortoises. He also collected a variety of mockingbirds, which appeared to be slightly different on each island, leading him to think that they must have evolved along different paths from a common ancestor. 
 Charles Darwin 
During his career, Darwin studied mutations resulting from breeding experiments and eventually came to believe that the mechanism underlying the process of evolution was that of ‘natural selection’ or ‘survival of the fittest’. This idea led him to publish the ground-breaking book On the Origin of Species in 1859. 

UFV declared Feb 9-13 2009 Darwin Bicentennial week at the university and welcomed students, faculty, alumni, and the public to a number of activities as part of a series of events held worldwide (details at www.darwinday.org) in recognition of what would have been Darwin's 200th birthday on February 12, 2009.

Supporting materials
"Perspectives on Evolution and Creation.” Free public lecture by Dr. Barbara Moon, head of the UFV Biology department. View the presentation slides.


On March 10, 2009, Charles Darwin (aka Dr. Greg Bole, UBC zoologist, left) met his
great-great-grandson, Sir James Barlow (second from right) at UFV. They are
accompanied by Dr. Sharon Gillies (Biology faculty), second from left, and Dr. Dianne
Common, VP Academic and Provost (right).  
 
View the video of Mr. Darwin sharing his life story with the audience at UFV.
 
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