TRADES & TECHNOLOGY TRAINING

Department website:  www.ufv.ca/scitech/trades

Trades and Technology programs at UCFV include: 
(You can click on a program in the following list to take you to a detailed description, but be sure to also read the general information directly under this list.)

All trades programs except Drafting are run on a continuous-waitlist basis and seats are offered for classes starting in September, January and April, according to the capacity of the program. Application is made directly to the Trades and Technology department.

The Drafting program starts each September and continues into June. Applications are accepted beginning October 1, 1999, for the September 2000 class. See How to Apply below for further application details.

Application for all trades programs except Drafting is made directly to the Trades and Technology department. All Trades programs, shops, and labs are located in the Trades and Technology Centre at the Abbotsford campus, which is open 7:30 am–3:30 pm, Monday–Friday. Classes and shops
are in session 7:30 am–1:30 pm, Monday–Friday.

Career Technical Centre

The Career Technical Centre is a unique learning facility. It is operated by School District #34 (Abbotsford) with the joint sponsorship of the University College of the Fraser Valley. Senior secondary students combine their Grade 11 and 12 subjects with UCFV certificate programs. Graduates of the two-and-a-half year integrated program have the option of seeking direct employment in their field of technical specialty or continuing their studies at the second-year level at UCFV or another post-secondary institution.

Students who complete the program will receive their Ministry of Education certificate conferring secondary school graduation as well as a certificate for the first year of college studies from the University College of the Fraser Valley.

Programs Offered at CTC:

For More Information:

Seats in each program are limited. For additional information and application forms, contact Career Technical Centre, 2272 Windsor Street, Abbotsford, B.C. V2S 5W6 Phone (604) 850-8672; fax (604) 850-0667.

Entrance Requirements for all Trades programs except Drafting and CTC

1. B.C. secondary school graduation or equivalent

2. A math and reading comprehension entrance exam

How to Apply

1. Read the program description and information carefully. If you wish to speak to the instructor, call (604) 853-7441, and ask for the appropriate local.

2. You may apply to the program while you are completing your prerequisites by providing a statement from your counsellor or high school principal indicating that you are in your last semester of studies and are likely to graduate.

3. Make an appointment with the Trades & Technology receptionist to write the entrance exam by calling (604) 854-4548. There is no fee for writing the exam.

4. When a seat is available, you will be notified by telephone of the registration procedures. If you cannot be reached by telephone after three attempts, you will be removed from the applicant list.

Fees and Additional Costs

Fee estimates are about $35 per week which includes 6% for Student Services fee, Student Society fee and the Legacy Fund. Fees are payable on a quarterly (15-week) basis. The total fee is about $530 every 15 weeks. Fifty dollars of the first payment is not refundable. You will also be charged a one time only application fee.

(The fees for Welding Upgrading students are $35 per week, plus $50 per test for test materials, and $50 per position for evaluation tests.)

Refunds will be based on the number of whole weeks remaining in a quarter after the date of completion or official withdrawal from the program. The completion date is determined by the Trades department.

Note: See the Fees and Other Costs section for further information.

Other Approximate Costs

Auto Technician: $500 for basic handtools, $500 for required textbooks, and $125 for appropriate working apparel.

Carpentry: $350 for basic handtools, $600 for required textbooks, and $50–85 for appropriate working apparel.

Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport Technician: $500 for basic handtools, $950 for required textbooks, and $125 for appropriate working apparel.

Joinery: $350 for basic handtools; $450 for required textbooks, and $50–85 for appropriate working apparel.

Parts and Warehousing: $85 for textbooks and ring binder, and $550 for learning guides.

Welding: $230 for basic handtools, $300 for required textbooks, and $500 for appropriate working apparel.

Auto Technician certificate

At UCFV, we can put you on the road towards a career as an automotive technician. The Auto Technician program will prepare you for entry into the automotive service and repair industry. Successful completion may also provide you with advanced placement in the Automotive Service Technician apprenticeship program. You will get a thorough introduction to the trade and develop skills expected by employers. You will have the opportunity to acquire a general knowledge base on most systems used on today's cars and light trucks.

Shop and study lab procedures are set up to simulate job conditions, so punctuality and good work habits are essential. This program is part of the entry-level provincial standard taught throughout the Province of B.C.

Career Technical Centre: UCFV and School District #34 (Abbotsford) operate a jointly sponsored Career Technical Centre. Auto Technician students enter at the Grade 11 level and complete high school and a one-year UCFV Auto Technician certificate over three years.

Faculty:

Dean Key, Journeyman Automotive Technician, CUIP Certification

Note: Automotive apprenticeship training is also offered at the Abbotsford campus. For more details call the local apprenticeship office at (604) 852-5922.

Employment Opportunities

Students who are successful in completing the Automotive program will find they are well prepared for employment opportunities in the automotive industry, with automobile dealers or independent repair centres, service stations, and in private shops dealing with fleet maintenance. Graduates can also apply to the provincial apprenticeship office, ITAC, for information regarding credit for the Automotive apprenticeship program.

Program Outline

This program is divided into many short-course units which include both written and practical skills. Many of these units will be completed through self-directed learning by following directions in the learning guides.You must show that you understand the theory by successfully completing a written test at the end of each unit and demonstrating tasks for that unit.

You will be working with the help of modular learning packages that will guide and direct you in your studies. The learning materials may include printed worksheets, video tapes, display boards, lab manuals, and instructions, demonstrations and/or lectures by a qualified instructor.

At regular stages you will be required to move to a shop or lab area to perform various tasks in order to develop your related practical skills. Practical hands-on training as a part of your total plan will increase as you progress through your program, and should amount to about two-thirds of your training time overall. As much as possible, study lab and shop instruction is patterned after “on-the-job” situations, where a limited amount of direct supervision is required.

The training follows a modular system that begins by developing a wide variety of basic skills, and builds on these to develop intermediate and specialized skills required in this industry. The modular curriculum provides a flexible learning path, allowing accelerated learning opportunities for those entering the program with a greater experience or skill level. This performance-paced process allows students an accelerated completion time and/or an opportunity to develop higher levels of expertise in any area of the program.

Learning modules

Faculty

Rolf Arnold, Journeyman Automotive Technician, Instructor Diploma (VCC), Vehicle Inspection          Cert., AirCare Cert., Alternate Fuel Endorsement, ASE Automotive Master Technician
Bernie Duncan, Journeyman Automotive Technician, Instructor Diploma (VCC), Vehicle
    Inspection Cert., AirCare Cert., Alternate Fuel Endorsement, ASE Automotive Master                  Technician

Program Advisory Committee

Dave and Kathy Bowering, Abby Country Motors Ltd.
Alf Derksen, Bay City Motors
Terry Everett, Abbotsford Chrysler Ltd.
Peter Gray, Ford Canada
Bill Hall, Fastrac Automotive
Ron Hildebrandt, Helmut Service Centre
Willy Issak, Arvid’s Automotive Repair Ltd.
Chuck Johnson, Hall Pontiac
Rob Jukes, Brett’s Chev-Olds Cadillac
Del Kaupp

Harold Kerr, Valley Toyota Ltd.
Norm Koch, Motorcade
George MacDonald, Cherry Ford Sales Ltd.
Keith Major, Tuneup Centre
Chris Murphy, Pro Auto Care Ltd.
Ray Murphy, Riverside Chev Olds (Mission)
Bev Nakler, O'Connor Chrysler
Gordon Sciotti, Modern Tire Ltd.
Jake Seimens, Hub Motor Service Ltd.
Tom Sellmer, Pro Auto Care Ltd.
Rick Sperling, Mertin GM
Paul Tarasenko, Pioneer Garage Ltd.
Jason Wielenga, Brett’s Chev-Olds Cadillac
Bryan Yakashiro, Sunrise Toyota


Carpentry certificate

This program is designed to prepare you for entry into the provincial apprenticeship system, or for entry directly into employment. It introduces you to the carpentry trade, and develops skills expected by employers.

Shop and study lab procedures are set up to simulate job conditions, so punctuality and good work habits are essential. This program is part of the entry-level provincial standard taught throughout the Province of B.C.

Career Technical Centre

UCFV and School District #34 (Abbotsford) operate a jointly sponsored Career Technical Centre. Carpentry students enter at the Grade 11 level and complete high school and a one-year UCFV Carpentry certificate over three years.

Faculty:

Mark Ruan, Journeyman Carpentry

Note: Carpentry apprenticeship training is also offered at the Abbotsford campus. For more details call the local apprenticeship office at (604) 852-5922.

Employment Opportunities

Upon successful completion of the Carpentry program, you will be well prepared for employment opportunities in the construction industry and construction- related businesses such as: carpentry, building equipment and supplies sales, construction, shipping and delivery, building maintenance, and modular housing. A career in one of the construction trades offers good opportunities for those who are willing to spend several years in learning their trade. Graduates can also apply to the provincial apprenticeship office, ITAC, for information regarding entry into the apprenticeship program.

Program Outline

This program is divided into many units which include both written and practical skills. Many of these units will be completed through self-directed learning by following directions in the learning guides. You must show that you understand the theory by successfully completing a test at the end of each unit and by demonstrating the tasks found in that unit.

You will be working with the help of learning packages that will give step-by-step instructions. The learning materials may include printed worksheets, videotapes, display boards, lab manuals, and instruction sheets. Your learning structure will be facilitated by a qualified instructor, and will be enhanced by demonstrations and lectures.

At regular stages you will be required to move to a shop or lab area to perform various tasks in related practical skills. Practical hands-on training as a part of your total plan will increase as you progress through your program, and should amount to about two-thirds of your training time overall. As much as possible, study lab and shop instruction is patterned after “on-the-job” situations.

The training follows a modular system that begins by developing a wide variety of basic skills, and builds on these to develop intermediate and specialized skills required in this industry. The modular curriculum provides a flexible learning path, allowing accelerated learning opportunities for those entering the program with a greater experience or skill level. This performance-paced process allows students an accelerated completion time and/or an opportunity to develop higher levels of expertise in any area of the program.

Learning modules

Faculty

Richard Janssen, Journeyman Carpentry, Instructor Diploma (UBC)
Tim Lynch, Journeyman Carpentry, Instructor Diploma (VCC)

Program Advisory Committee

Jim Dent, Jim Dent Construction Ltd.
John Fictorie, Country West Construction
Greg Hesketh, Town Millwork
Darryl Johnston, Savage and Johnston Construction Ltd.
Casey Klaassen, Mardina Construction Ltd
Joe Meeres, Meeres Construction & Drafting
Steve Mohr, Carpenters Union Local 1807
Doug Maljaars, Starline Cabinet Co. Ltd.
Larry Mierau, Mierau Construction
John Penner, Jonet Construction

Lane Sweeting, Swagger Construction Ltd.
Warren Toews, A & T Contracting Ltd.
Hank Van Dyk, Cheam Countertops


Drafting Technician (Architectural/Civil) certificate

This full-time program has been designed to prepare students for entry-level drafting positions in the architectural, civil, and related fields.

Throughout this 10-month program, the instructors will endeavour to create an environment similar to that found in industry. Students will be given the maximum responsibility for the solution of design problems and will be encouraged to develop their creative talents and techniques beyond the level demanded of a junior draftsperson.

If you are interested in pursuing a career as a draftsperson, you should have good hand and eye coordination, mechanical aptitude, facility with mathematics, and the ability to communicate and work effectively with co-workers in a design team.

Career Technical Centre

UCFV and School District #34 (Abbotsford) operate a jointly sponsored Career Technical Centre. Drafting students enter at the Grade 11 level and complete high school and a one-year UCFV Drafting certificate over three years.

Employment Opportunities

If you complete this program successfully, your training will give you appropriate skills for employment in an entry-level position with a broad range of private firms or public agencies or departments which provide design and drafting services in architectural, civil, and related engineering fields.

Entrance Requirements

To be admitted you must:

How to Apply

1. Submit the application fee along with your UCFV application for admission form to the Admissions and Records (A&R) office. Application forms are available from any A&R or Student Services office. See complete list of application dates and general information.

Additional documents required for a complete application:

Applications that do not include these documents will be returned.

2. All applicants must attend an orientation session following receipt of their application. You will be informed about orientation dates in April. You must attend or make special arrangements with the instructors to be eligible for admission to the program.

3. Upon admission to the program, you will be invited to register. A deposit is required when you register (see the Fees and Other Costs section on page 17). This money is applied to the tuition fees and is not refundable. Final payment of all course fees is due by the end of the second week of classes.

If you meet all the entrance requirements, but the program is full, your name will be placed on a wait list. Should a space become available at a later date, you will be notified.

4. When interim transcripts are submitted, admission may be granted on the condition that courses be completed and final transcripts be sent to Admissions and Records. Proof of completion of entrance requirements and final payment of all course fees are due the end of the first week of August.

Application Dates

Applications will be accepted on or after October 1 for the fall semester.

Fees and Additional Costs

Fee estimates are for last year. New fees are usually set each May. The full fee is approximately $1,450 and must be paid when you register. This includes 6% for Student Services fees, Students Society, and the Legacy Fund. Other costs for textbooks, drawing kits, binders, calculators, rain gear, etc., are approximately $700.

Note:There are no refunds after 7% of the program has been completed.

Workload and Classroom Expectations

You are required to attend all classes — five hours a day, five days a week. In addition, you will be responsible for the completion of approximately 15 hours of assigned homework each week.

Dates and Location

The program starts in September, and is located in the Trades and Technology Centre, Abbotsford campus.

Program Outline

The new provincial common core drafting program was incorporated into the program in 1996. In addition to the common core, two specialties in design and drafting will be offered.

This program has been developed on the following modular basis:

1. DRFT 1: Basic Drafting — 1 month

2. DRFT 2: Applied Mathematics — 0.5 months

3. DRFT 3: Computer Assisted Design (CAD) — introduction to Autocad Release 14 — 1.5 months

4. DRFT 4: Architectural — Residential/Commercial Design and Drafting. This module includes major design projects — 4 months

5. DRFT 5: Mechanics and Strength of Materials —
0.5 months

6. DRFT 6: Civil Drafting — Basic and advanced surveying encompassing both the field and office operations and procedures associated with road building and layout, construction and utility layout and land surveying — 2.5 months

7. CMNS 145: Technical Communications for Drafting — 14 sessions

Note: This program was re-accredited by the Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of B.C. (ASTTBC) in 1991, and has been granted academic credit for 10 of the 12 subject areas required for Certified Technician status with ASTTBC. Graduates of the program may complete two additional subject areas in either the Building or Civil disciplines to attain full academic requirements for certification.

Faculty

Larry Gritzmaker, Journeyperson Carpentry, Certificate in Architectural and Civil Drafting (UCFV),      Instructor Diploma (VCC), Certified Technician (ASTTBC)
Tricia Thomson, Diploma in Building Technology (BCIT), Applied Science Technologists                   (ASTTBC), Instructor Diploma (VCC)

Program Advisory Committee

Ron Clifford, First Heritage Savings
Doug Clough, Omega & Associates Engineering
Phillip Craven, Craven, Houston & Powers
George Epp, L.M.S. Design & Drafting
Dwayne Friesen, Westwood Building Systems
Glenn Froese, Krahn & Associates
Darren Hall, D & D Drafting
Jim Hipwell, PlanTech Design & Drafting Incorporated
Eric Hoogenraad, City of Abbotsford
Bjorn Lauridsen, Bjorn Lauridsen & Associates
Teresa Meeres, Meeres Construction & Drafting
Kevin O’Shea, School District #34
Arm Pettie, Shelter Industries
Jeff Wright, Britco Structures


Electrical

This program is offered only at the Career Technical Centre.
Phone (604) 850-8672; fax (604) 850-0667.

This program helps develop basic skills and knowledge used in the electrical trades. The Electrical program includes specifics such as code regulations, wiring methods, service load calculations, and safety procedures. Graduates of this program will be well prepared to enter the electrical trade as an apprentice.

Note: Electrical apprenticeship training is also offered at the Abbotsford campus. For more details call the local apprenticeship office at (604) 852-5922.

Career Technical Centre: UCFV and School District #34 (Abbotsford) operate a jointly sponsored Career Technical Centre. Electrical students enter at the Grade 11 level and complete high school and a one-year UCFV Electrical certificate over three years.

Faculty:

David Riel, Interprovincial TQ in Electrical (B.C.), Industrial Electrician Certification, Diploma in          Electrical Engineering Technology, ASTT B.C. C. Tech Certification, Instructor Diploma,           Adult Education Diploma (UCC)
John Todrick, TQ Electrical Work, Interprovincial seal, Computer Maintenance Technician, Amp         Act I Certificate


Electronics

This program is offered only at the Career Technical Centre.
Phone (604) 850-8672; fax (604) 850-0667.

Students complete the one-year electronics technician common core program. It provides students with the skills to install, maintain and repair electronic circuits and equipment. You will learn the correct use of tools and test equipment, troubleshooting procedures, and soldering techniques, based upon the relevant electrical theory. Graduates will have the opportunity to proceed into a specialty technician program.

Career Technical Centre: UCFV and School District #34 (Abbotsford) operate a jointly sponsored Career Technical Centre. Electronics students enter at the Grade 11 level and complete high school and a one-year UCFV Electronics certificate over three years.

Faculty:

Randy Kelley, Computer Maintenance Technology Diploma, Instructor Diploma, Adult Education      Diploma (VCC), Master of Education-in-progress


Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport certificate

At UCFV, we can put you on the road towards a career as a heavy duty or commercial transport technician by teaching you how to service and repair large vehicles such as trucks and heavy equipment. The Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport program will prepare you for entry into the provincial apprenticeship program, or for entry directly into employment. You’ll develop skills needed to work in the trade.

Shop and study lab procedures are set up to simulate job conditions, so punctuality and good work habits are essential. This program is part of the entry-level provincial standard taught throughout British Columbia.

Employment Opportunities

After successfully completing the program, you will be prepared for employment in the heavy equipment industry. Potential employers include logging, trucking and bus companies, the mining industry, and agricultural shops.

Graduates can also apply to the provincial apprenticeship office. For information regarding entry into the Heavy Duty/Commercial Transport apprenticeship program, please contact (604) 852-5922.

Program Outline

This program is divided into units which include both written and practical skills. Many of these units will be competed through self-directed learning by following directions in the learning guides. You must show that you understand the theory by successfully completing a test at the end of each unit and by demonstrating the tasks in that unit.

You will be working with the help of learning packages that will give step-by-step instructions. The learning materials may include printed worksheets, videotapes, display boards, lab manuals, and instructions, demonstrations and/or lectures by a qualified instructor.

At regular stages you will be required to move to a shop or lab area to perform various tasks in order to develop your practical skills. Practical hands-on training as a part of your total plan will increase as you progress through your program, and should amount to about two-thirds of your training time overall. As much as possible, study lab and shop instruction is patterned after “on-the-job” situations, where a limited amount of direct supervision is required.

The training follows a modular system that begins by developing a wide variety of basic skills, and builds on these to develop intermediate and specialized skills required in this industry. The modular curriculum provides a flexible learning path, allowing accelerated learning opportunities for those entering the program with a greater experience or skill level. This performance-paced process allows students an accelerated completion time and/or an opportunity to develop higher levels of expertise in any area of the program.

Teaching unit components

Faculty

Joe Kovacs, Journeyman Heavy Duty and Commercial Transport, Instructor Diploma (UBC),              Vehicle Inspection Certificate

Program Advisory Committee

Gino Amato, Coast Tractor
Brent Balluff, Finning Ltd.
Dan Bell, Summit Logistics
Bryan Bouchir, District of Mission
Kent Douglas, Pacific Northern Rail Contractors Corp.
Rick Flegg, City of Abbotsford, UCFV Board – Trades Representative
Bob Herd, Parker Pacific Equipment Sales
Mark Jones, Freightliner Trucks
Ron Keeping, Friesen Equipment
Jim Laird, Central Valley Farm Equipment Ltd.
Jim McMillan, Transportation and Highways Equipment Services
Ivan Mills, Central Valley Farm Equipment Ltd.
Andy Mitchal, Wajax Industries
Don Pasiuk, Peterbilt Trucks Pacific Inc.
Dave Polack, Orion Western Star Ltd.
Dan Pollard, Eagle Trailer
Larry Rempel, Emil Anderson Construction
Dave Senchal, Mainroad Contracting
Dave Shelford, Canadian Forest Products
Jim Trainor, T.E.K. Truck Services
Randy Trainor, T.E.K. Truck Services
Jake Wiebe, Avenue Farm Machinery Ltd.
Bob Wilson, Co-Van International Truck Inc.


Joinery certificate

This program is designed to prepare you for entry into the provincial apprenticeship system, or for direct entry into employment. It introduces you to the trade and develops skills expected of you by employers.

Shop and study lab procedures are set up to simulate job conditions, so punctuality and good work habits are essential. This program is part of the entry-level provincial standard taught throughout British Columbia.

Employment Opportunities

Students who are successful in completing the Joinery program will find they are well-prepared for employment opportunities that exist in the cabinet industry and related businesses such as interior finishing and trimming, furniture manufacturing, cottage industries, and van interior customizing. A career in one of the joinery trades offers good opportunities for those who are willing to spend several years learning the trade. Graduates can also apply to the provincial apprenticeship office. For information regarding entry into the Joinery apprenticeship program please contact (604) 852-5922.

Program Outline

This program is divided into units which include both written and practical skills. Many of these units will be completed through self-directed learning by following directions in the learning guides. You must show that you understand the written part by successfully completing a test at the end of each unit and by demonstrating the tasks found in that unit.

You will be working with the help of learning packages that will give step-by-step instructions. The learning materials may include printed worksheets, videotapes, display boards, lab manuals, and instructions, demonstrations and/or lectures by a qualified instructor.

At regular stages you will be required to move to a shop or lab area to perform various tasks using related practical skills. Practical hands-on training as a part of your total plan will increase as you progress through your program, and should amount to about two-thirds of your training time overall. As much as possible, study lab and shop instruction is patterned after “on-the-job” situations, where a limited amount of direct supervision is required.

The training follows a modular system that begins by developing a wide variety of basic skills, and builds on these to develop intermediate and specialized skills required in this industry. The modular curriculum provides a flexible learning path, allowing accelerated learning opportunities for those entering the program with a greater experience or skill level. This performance-paced process allows students an accelerated completion time and/or an opportunity to develop higher levels of expertise in any area of the program.

Learning modules

Faculty

Richard Janssen, Journeyman Carpentry, Instructor Diploma (UBC)

Program Advisory Committee

Jim Dent, Jim Dent Construction Ltd.
John Fictorie, Country West Construction
Greg Hesketh, Town Millwork
Darryl Johnston, Savage and Johnston Construction Ltd.
Casey Klaassen, Mardina Construction Ltd
Joe Meeres, Meeres Construction & Drafting
Steve Mohr, Carpenters Union Local 1907
Doug Maljaars, Starline Cabinet Co. Ltd.
Larry Mierau, Mierau Construction
John Penner, Jonet Construction
Lane Sweeting, Swagger Construction Ltd.
Warren Toews, A & T Contracting Ltd.
Hank Van Dyk, Cheam Countertops


Parts & Warehousing certificate

At UCFV, we can help to prepare you for employment in the parts and warehousing industry. The Parts and Warehousing program will prepare you for entry into the provincial apprenticeship program, or for entry directly into employment. You’ll get a thorough introduction to the trade, and develop skills expected by employers.

Shop and study lab procedures are set up to simulate job conditions, so punctuality and good work habits are essential. This program is part of the entry-level provincial standard taught throughout British Columbia.

Employment Opportunities

Upon successful completion of the Parts & Warehousing program, you’ll be prepared for employment opportunities in the automotive industry, with auto dealerships, independent jobbers, warehouses, industrial suppliers, and department stores.

Program Outline

This program is divided into units which include both written and practical skills. Many of these units will be completed through self-directed learning by following directions in the learning guides. You must show that you understand the written part by successfully completing a test at the end of each unit and by demonstrating the tasks for that unit.

You will be working with the help of learning packages that will give step-by-step instructions. The learning materials may include printed worksheets, videotapes, display boards, lab manuals, instructions, and demonstrations and/or lectures by a qualified instructor.

At regular stages you will be required to move to a shop or lab area to perform various tasks using related practical skills. Practical hands-on training as a part of your total plan will increase as you progress through your program, and should amount to about two-thirds of your training time overall. As much as possible, study lab and shop instruction is patterned after “on-the-job” situations.

The training follows a modular system that begins by developing a wide variety of basic skills, and builds on these to develop intermediate and specialized skills required in this industry. The modular curriculum provides a flexible learning path, allowing accelerated learning opportunities for those entering the program with a greater experience or skill level. This performance-paced process allows students an accelerated completion time and/or an opportunity to develop higher levels of expertise in any area of the program.

Learning modules

Faculty

Vern Wright, Journeyman Automotive Technician, Vehicle Inspection Certificate, AirCare                  Certification, Alternate Fuel Endorsement, LPG and CNG

Program Advisory Committee

Wayne Becker, Cascade Industrial Supply Co. Ltd.
Gordon Bellam, Gregg’s Distributors
Ernie Cameron, Valley Toyota
David Code, Lordco
Jim Evans, Wakefield Sperling
Daryl Johnson, Sunrise Toyota
Richard Morris, Abbotsford Chrysler
Darryl Muir, Motorcade Inc.
Randy Regagliati, United Automotive Distributors
Reg Slinn, UAP/NAPA Clearbrook
Bud Stephenson, All Parts Auto
John Warlimont, Truckline Parts
Al Wood, Tidewater Industrial Supplies Ltd.
Ron Wood, MSA Ford, PAC chair


Welding C, B, & A certificate

This program is organized to accept both advanced and entry-level students within the same class. Most of your training will be individualized and is based on a modular program.

Career Technical Centre

UCFV and School District #34 (Abbotsford) operate a jointly sponsored Career Technical Centre. Level “C” Welding students enter at the Grade 11 level and complete high school and a one-year UCFV Level “C” Welding certificate over three years.

Note: In addition to being listed and signed off in the C-Level Welding Logbook, a UCFV Welder Fitting certificate will be issued.

Faculty

Sheldon Frank, Journeyman Level A Welding Certification, IP< Boilermaking (Erection) certificate,      IP Steel Fabrication Certificate, Instructor Diploma (VCC)

Welding Level C

This program offers basic training for entry-level employment in a broad variety of welding, steel fabrication and related jobs. The curriculum covered is organized on the modular plan adopted by the provincial welding trades advisory committee. The particular modules taught in this course have been adopted as a result of priorities and recommendations of our local advisory committee.

Employment Opportunities

Upon successful completion of this program you will be prepared for a variety of employment opportunities in metal working industries, such as production welder, maintenance welder, welder-fitter, welder-fabricator, etc.

Program Outline

Levels C, B, and A

Level C

C-P-1 Introduction and Program Orientation

C-P-2 Oxyfuel Gas Cutting (OFC)

C-P-3 Gas Welding and Braze Welding

C-P-4 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW #1)

C-P-5 Air Carbon Arc Gouging (AAG)

C-P-6 Gas Metal Arc Welding #1 (GMAW #1)

Flux Cored Arc Welding #1 (FCAW #1)

C-RK-1 Material Handling

C-RK-2 Blue Print Reading #1

C-RK-3 Welding Metallurgy #1

Mathematics Supplement

Level B

B-P-7 Shielded Metal Arc Welding #2 (SMAW #2)

B-P-8 Gas Metal Arc Welding #2 (GMAW #2)

B-P-9 Flux Cored Arc Welding #2 (FCAW #2)

B-P-10 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding #1 (GTAW #1)

B-RK-4 Welding Quality Control and Inspection Standards

B-RK-5 Welding Codes, Standards and Specifications

B-RK-6 Blue Print Reading #2

B-RK-7 Welding Metallurgy #2

Level A

A-P-11 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW #3)

A-P-12 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW #2)

A-RK-8 Welding Metallurgy #3

A-RK-9 Blue Print Reading #3

In addition to the above topics, you will be required to practise layout and fabrication by completing a series of fabrication exercises and projects. Most students should be able to complete the entry-level training, including the fabrication exercises and projects, in about seven to eight months.

Welding Upgrading

The Welding program is organized so the “upgraders” have easy access to training at various times during the year. As spaces in class become available throughout the year, upgraders will have equal opportunity with pre-employment students to fill these spaces.

The purpose of the upgrading program is to assist those currently or recently employed in welding jobs to improve their techniques or become proficient in additional processes. Instruction will be based on the provincial modular system.

Fees for Upgrading Students

Tuition fees are about $35 per week, plus a $30 per week fee for supplies. MIG and TIG will require additional fees for supplies. Additional test material fees are: test, $50, and evaluation test, $50 per position. Fee estimates are for last year. New fees are usually set in May.

Faculty

Roger Moren, Journeyman Level A Welding Certification, TQ Steel Fabrication, Instructors                  Diploma (UBC)

Program Advisory Committee

Glen Berger, Hub Fire Engines
Lloyd Campbell, George Third & Sons
Lance Collins, Industra Manufacturing
Paul DeGianni, Overlanders Manufacturing Inc.
Alan Genesius, Finning Ltd.
Steve Green and Dan Pollard, Eagle Machine Inc.
Wayne Hannon, Procor (BC) Inc.
Herman Hartman, Hartco Machining Ltd.
Paul Hiebert, Mainland Machinery Ltd.
Kurt Klein
Les Knight, K-Line
Ken Krunick, I.M.W. Industries Ltd.
Ernest Loewen, Loewen Welding and Mfg. Ltd.
Scott McGhee, Ty-crop Manufacturing Ltd.
Loch McJannett, Newland Services Inc.
Joe Muzyka, Magnum Trailer & Equipment
Elmer Niezen, I.M.W. Industries Ltd.
Terry Plummer, RMS-Ross Corporation
Wayne Raiche, Loewen Welding and Mfg. Ltd.
Neil Schellenberg, Clearbrook Iron Works Ltd.
Albert Schulz, CRS group
Dale Schultz, Industra Manufacturing
Kevin Thiessen, Ty-crop Manufacturing Ltd.
Ron Van Eyk, Van Eyk Manufacturing


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