Prerequisites and Corequisites
Prerequisites/corequisites are requirements needed prior to, or concurrent with, your registration in a course. A prerequisite refers to a specific course (or other requirement) that must be successfully completed prior to registration. A minimum grade of C- is required.
It is understood that you may seek instructor’s written permission if you feel that your experience/knowledge is sufficient to warrant exemption from the stated prerequisite or corequisite. This written permission must be presented at the time of registration.
Even though many university college-level courses have no prerequisite listed, it is expected that those enrolling have university-college–level reading, writing, and research skills. If you are unsure of your ability level or want to improve your skills, we suggest you enrol in ENGL 099: Pre-College Composition, or CSM 108: Critical Analysis and Study Methodology, or write the Composition Placement Test (CPT). CPT details are explained on page 20. For details about CSM 108 and ENGL 099, please read the course descriptions on the following pages.
For more details on support services available, please see page 39, Student Services information on page 34, and the academic support courses listed on this page.
Please note: Students are expected to present either Math 12 or Principles of Math 12 to meet appropriate prerequisites. In addition, some UCFV departments require Math 12 provincial examination scores to fulfill prerequisites. Check your program’s entrance requirements section for details.
Unless otherwise stated, any B.C. secondary course used for program entrance requirements or course prerequisites must be completed for full value
(4 credits).
Academic Support courses
ABE TUTEE 0 credits
Tutored Adult Basic Education
Prerequisite(s): None
Tutorial where volunteer tutors help with reading, writing and mathematics at a beginning level on a one-to-one basis.
CAP 110 3 credits
Writing and Research Skills
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides a step-by-step process for writing research papers. The course deals with instructors’ expectations for academic performance. A multicultural curriculum is used.
CAP 120 3 credits
Potential Development Training
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides personal and career exploration. A multicultural curriculum is used.
CAP 130 3 credits
Reading and Study
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides academic support skills and techniques for the other courses that students are/will be taking. Topics include time and stress management, rapid reading, and study hints. A multicultural curriculum is used.
CAP 140 3 credits
Career Planning
Prerequisite(s): None
This 60-hour three-credit course provides opportunities for the development of communication, leadership, teamwork, and computer skills. Thirty of the 60 hours are spent in a supervised practicum with a business or community agency of the student’s choice. Participants also learn the latest strategies in job hunting and career planning.
CCP LC 0 credits
College and Career Preparation Learning Centre
Prerequisite(s): None
Learning Centres focus on upgrading designed to provide students with entry-level requirements for specfic UCFV vocational, applied, and academic programs.
CCP LC2B 0 credits
College and Career Preparation Learning Centre (Extended length)
Prerequisite(s): None
A Learning Centre that provides about twice as much contact as usual.
COMP 061 2 credits
Introduction to Computers
Prerequisite(s): College and Career Preparation (CCP) department permission
This course is a basic introduction to computer concepts, keyboarding, word processing, email, and Internet use for those people who have little or no experience with computers. This course is designed for students in College and Career Preperation, but others may be admitted with permission of the CCP department.
COMP 071 2 credits
Introduction to Computers (Part II)
Prerequisite(s): College and Career Preparation (CCP) department permission
This course is an intermediate computer course that combines some computer theory background, Windows environment, introduction to spreadsheets, and intermediate topics in word processing. Comp 071 is designed for students in College and Career Preparation, preferably those who have taken Comp 061, but others may be admitted with permission of the CCP department.
Note: Beginner students are advised to take Comp 061 before taking Comp 071.
CSM 104 3 credits
Integrated Academic Learning Skills
Prerequisite(s): C+ or better in ESL WG74 and R70, or articulated equivalent.
Pre- or corequisite(s): ESL WG84 or articulated equivalent.
This course is designed specifically for international education students to academically support their first year courses. Topics covered include analytical listening strategies, contemporary study approaches, and interactive group communication. CSM 104 uses current post-secondary course materials with an emphasis on scholarly research to explore individual learning differences and approaches to the disciplines.
Note: This course is not equivalent to CSM 108.
CSM 108 3 credits
Critical Analysis and Study Methodology
Prerequisite(s): ESL students must have ESL WG84, ESL S76, ESL L87, ESL R80, or permission of the instructor
If you are returning after a period of absence from student life, or if you need to improve your ability to understand university-college material as well as improve your study efficiency, you should register for this course. CSM 108 covers the techniques needed to succeed in your other subjects: Critical thinking, exam preparation and writing, stress and time management, essay writing overview, note taking, study methods, fast textbook reading, and strategies for active learning in the content areas.
CSM 208 3 credits
Advanced Critical Analysis and Learning Methodology
(formerly CMNS 208)
Prerequisite(s): CSM 108; CMNS 125 or CMNS 155
A continuation of the principles and skills learned in CSM 108 and introduces students to the next level of critical thinking and higher education learning through course presentation and assignments. Students will learn effective strategies to enable them to work independently as well as work effectively in a group setting. Lecture examples and assignments will be linked, wherever possible, to academic content in other courses.
ECP 064 4 credits
Education and Career Planning Career Explorations
Prerequisite(s): None
Designed to provide employment-readiness skills and the necessary life skills to students who wish to pursue education and/or occupational goals.
ECP 074 4 credits
Education and Career Planning Skills for Success
Prerequisite(s): CCP assessment
This course is designed to develop your skills in learning, communication, and self-management in order to successfully reach your goals in both education and work. This course teaches new and effective learning strategies, communication and conflict resolution skills, and creative career exploration and planning.
RSS 098 3 credits
Introduction to Reading and Study Skills
Prerequisite(s): Admission to either the CTC Health & Human Services, or Adventure Tourism certificate programs
This introductory reading and study skills course is designed specifically for students in the Health & Human Services and Adventure Tourism programs at CTC. Students will learn basic speed reading techniques and writing skills to facilitate comprehension of their textbooks. In addition, program content material will be used as a basis for learning preliminary study strategies.
SCI 061 4 credits
Fundamental Science
Prerequisite(s): individual CCP assessment
This course consists of three introductory units in chemistry, biology, and earth science.

Adult Basic Education
ABE TUT 2 0 credits
In-Service Tutor Training
Prerequisite(s): None
Under the supervision of a UCFV instructor, trained tutors work with literacy level students in one-to-one or small group settings. Tutors receive support and additional training throughout their placements.
ABE TUTEE 0 credits
Tutored Adult Basic Education
Prerequisite(s): None
Tutorial where volunteer tutors help students with reading, writing and numeracy at a beginning level on a one-to-one or small group setting.
Adult Education
Some of the seats in these courses are reserved for students in the Adult Education program. If there is space, other students are welcome to register providing they receive permission from the Adult Education department. The department offers at least one course per semester via online media.
ADED 200 3 credits
Portfolio Development for Prior Learning Assessment
Prerequisite(s): A minimum CPT score of 48, or any first year Engl, or Engl 081 or 091 with a minimum grade of C+, or first-year communications with a minimum grade of C, ADED 310 or ADED 320, or instructor’s permission.
An introduction to the concept of prior learning assessment and recognition (PLAR) and its relationship to lifelong learning. Major emphasis will be placed on one of the methods used to assess prior learning — the portfolio method. In the context of your educational goals, you will prepare a comprehensive written portfolio which identifies and documents your prior learning. The finished portfolio subsequently may be used to request PLA credit toward a post-secondary program. Because assessing institutions require portfolios to be well-written and well-organized, you should have strong writing and organization skills. We recommend Adult Education program students enrol in this course only after completing at least six Adult Education credits.
ADED 310 3 credits
Introduction to Adult Education
Prerequisite(s): None.
This course surveys the philosophical and historical foundations of adult education, its methods and approaches, its organizations, and issues confronting contemporary adult education practice. It is highly recommended that you enrol in this course during the first or second semester of the Adult Education degree program.
ADED 320 3 credits
Adult Learning
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will orient participants to adult learning, develop their understanding of some theoretical perspectives, and provide an opportunity for consideration of implications for practice. Topics include: selected theories and concepts of adult development, selected theories regarding circumstances and processes of adult learning, and characteristics of adults as learners. It is highly recommended that you enrol in this course during the first or second semester of the Adult Education degree program.
ADED 330 3 credits
Special Topics in Adult Education
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the program, or instructor’s permission
Course offerings under this heading will supplement regular program offerings by examining selected and emergent topics in adult education. Intermittent offerings will be determined by availability of faculty, resources, and learner interest. Examples of topics include Learning in the Workplace, Education for Health, and Bridging to Adult Education. Contact department for current offerings.
ADED 340 3 credits
Program Planning and Evaluation
Prerequisite(s): Any two of ADED 310, ADED 320, or ADED 360
This course will provide a basis for responsible, reflective program planning practice by introducing participants to key concepts, principles, and issues in program planning processes, and to the diverse settings in which those processes are carried out. The course will emphasize the development of a critical perspective. Through study of recent theory and actual cases, participants will assess the extent to which educational program planning is an important site in the struggle over the definition, sources, and purposes of legitimate knowledge.
ADED 345 3 credits
Instructional Skills for Professionals
Prerequisite(s): (CMNS 125 and 250) or (Engl 105 and one of Engl 110 to 150) or (CMNS 155 and 250)
This course provides an opportunity to design and teach using a variety of media, to a variety of audiences, in a variety of situations. Developing lesson plans, using instructional technologies, developing and using evaluation techniques, and conducting on-the-job training are the focus of the course. This course is the same as CMNS 345.
Note: Some public speaking skills are assumed in this course.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ADED 345 and CMNS 345.
ADED 350 3 credits
Storytelling and the Reflective Practitioner
Prerequisite(s): Admission to program and ADED 310 or 320 or 360
This course will introduce learners to the theories and practices of using stories as a method for reflecting on our practice. The practice we will most likely be reflecting on is that of adult education, although this method of storytelling is also used for any reflection-oriented attempt to make meaning. We will explore common theories of teaching, learning, and storytelling, and we will all have opportunities to reflect on our experiences through stories.
ADED 360 3 credits
Adult Education in the Canadian Context: History and Trends
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the program or instructor’s permission
Adult education in Canada operates within a diverse field of educational perspectives and within a complex public policy realm, shared between the federal and the provincial or territorial governments. This course examines the practices, vocation, and trends of the field within the context of historical, social, political, and economic influences. We examine ways in which formal, nonformal, and informal adult education practices shape and are shaped by this milieu.
ADED 370 3 credits
Guided Independent Study
Prerequisite(s): Nine UCFV Adult Education credits and permission of the course coordinator
A supervised, research and/or field-based activity through which you will either diversify your experience base or refine and deepen your understanding of selected areas of concentration. The course offers an opportunity to integrate, and apply theories and practices in your areas of interest. (Subject to faculty availability.) Guidelines for the development of a learning contract for the study are available from the department or online. Students are urged to speak to the course coordinator and/or their program advisor well in advance of registration.
ADED 380 3 credits
Instructional Technologies
Prerequisite(s): One of ADED 310, 320, 360
Advances in technology present new ways for adult education to overcome barriers to participation. This course prepares you to select, implement, and evaluate appropriate technologies for offering learning opportunities to adults. Emphasis is on application of adult learning theory and system design principles. Although media play an important role in this course, the focus is on the underlying issues of adult education using “new” technologies.
ADED 390 3 credits
Seminar in Selecting, Evaluating, and Using Adult Education Research
Prerequisite(s): Nine UCFV ADED credits
This course will involve a survey and examination of past and current research in the disciplines related to education in general, and adult education in particular. It will include an examination of research perspectives, methods of inquiry, research trends, and interests served. Participants will be encouraged to build skills in summarizing and critiquing research reports by identifying a researchable issue and conducting a related literature review.
ADED 405 3 credits
Honouring Human Diversity in Adult Education Contexts
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ADED program and 15 ADED upper-level credits
This course explores various dimensions of human diversity — age, race, class, sexual orientation, ability, and gender, and their effect on learning; critically examines dominant attitudes toward diversity in the Canadian culture; provides course participants the opportunity to reflect on their own beliefs; and studies the implications of exclusion and inclusion for participants’ practice of adult education.
ADED 410 3 credits
Adult Education and Social Change
Prerequisite(s): Six credits of ADED, or Soc 333, and three upper-level ADED credits
Rapid economic and social change create new sites of adult education practice, and changes in social policy create new groups of learners. This course surveys global, national, and local social change, and reviews the history of adult education’s responses to change. The course challenges participants to critically examine competing perspectives on the role of adult education in promoting or impeding social justice, and their own position as reflected in their practice.
ADED 420 3 credits
Adult Education in the Global Context
Prerequisite(s): ADED 310, 360 or 410, or Soc 101 or 250, or Anth 102 or 220, or POSC 110 or 120
Institutions and the delivery of adult education have evolved very differently from country to country, and are increasingly affected by international organizations and other interests. Using a variety of program and policy examples, this course provides comparative and international perspectives on the history and the philosophical, socio-economic, and political foundations of adult education, including course participants’ fields of practice.
ADED 430 3 credits
Administration of Adult Education
Prerequisite(s): Nine UCFV ADED credits
The administration of adult education in institutions, community agencies, and private consulting is a specialized and complex management function. In this course you will examine concepts such as organizational planning, coordination, marketing, financing, and staffing, and learn how these concepts are applied to the administration and management of adult education. Special emphasis will be given to the idea of leadership.
ADED 446 3 credits
Popular Education
(formerly ADED 336)
Prerequisite(s): ADED 410 and three other UCFV ADED credits
This course will be of interest to people currently working or preparing to work for progressive social change in community settings around such concerns as poverty, health, racism, peace, native self-government, environment, women’s equality, community economic development, trade practices, food distribution, and media literacy. The course explores the use of a collective adult learning approach as an alternative or adjunct to purely political action or individual empowerment and healing models. Photo novels, radio, popular theatre, participatory research, and study circles are examples of alternative approaches that will be studied. In this course we emphasize the essential philosophical foundation of these alternative methods and practice skills required in their practical application in international and local settings. We explore the possibilities of adult education as a means of emancipation rather than domination.
ADED 470 3 credits
Synthesis Project in Adult Education
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 30 Adult Education credits and permission of the course coordinator
This course is intended to provide an opportunity for learners near the conclusion of their program of study to integrate the various concepts, philosophies, and knowledge of the field into a congruent professional identity in their practice through preparation of a major paper or other approved non-traditional project. (Subject of faculty availability.) Study in ADED 470 usually is conducted in the context of a student-prepared learning contract. Guidelines for the development of a learning contract for the study are available from the department or online. Students are urged to speak to the course coordinator and/or their program advisor well in advance of registration.
ADED 480 3 credits
Seminar in Adult Education Issues
Prerequisite(s): Nine upper-level ADED credits
This intermittent offering will provide opportunities to address, as they arise, particular emerging issues or areas of controversy in the field of adult education practice and/or study. Particular offerings will depend upon availability of faculty resources, trends in the field, and learner interest. Example of current offerings include Ethics in Adult Education, and Political & Social Dimensions of Workforce Training. Contact the department for current offerings.
Agriculture
Most of the seats in these courses are normally reserved for students in an agriculture program. Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space.
AGRI 103 5 credits
Introduction to Milking and the Dairy Farm
Prerequisite(s): Agri 134, Agri 183, Agri 231
Corequisite(s): Agri 104 and admission to the Milker Training program
Introduction to typical dairy farms; use and basic maintenance of milking equipment; practical herd health concerns and reproduction in the dairy cow; care of calves; basic physiology of the dairy cow, principles of nutrition and sanitation. Regulations affecting the dairy industry will be reviewed. Field trips at student expense will be required.
AGRI 104 4 credits
Practical Milking Work Experience
Prerequisite(s): Agri 134, Agri 183, Agri 231
Corequisite(s): Agri 103 and admission to the Milker Training program
All students will participate in the care of dairy livestock in the UCFV barn. Each student will be assigned work experience, without remuneration, on commercial host farms throughout the 12 weeks to develop their skills and efficiency. Students must provide their own appropriate work clothing and must have a valid driver’s licence and reliable transportation. Work hours will include both early morning and late afternoon milkings. Host farmers will participate in the evaluation of each student.
AGRI 111 3 credits
Introduction to Soils
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to soil as a medium for plant growth. Focuses on soil properties, including texture, structure, bulk density, water relationships, and soil formation. The soils of British Columbia are featured. The CLI system of soil capability for agriculture classification will be introduced.
AGRI 112 2 credits
Soil Fertility and Fertilizers
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to soil fertility and fertilizers, including: soil reaction; essential elements; mineral nutrition of higher plants; soil organic matter; lime; soil sampling and interpretation of soil test results; soil fertilizer materials, their manufacture, storage and methods of application; and economics of fertilizer use.
AGRI 121 1 credit
Principles of On-Farm Food Safety
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces HACCP-based programs (hazard analysis and critical control points) as they relate to a safe food industry in BC and Canada. The four types of potential hazards and the identification of their critical control points for fields, farm buildings, and factors involving people will be discussed. The differences between HACCP and HACCP-based programs as they relate to food production, an overview of record keeping, and an introduction to the major commodity-specific programs will be covered. Case studies will be used. Actual commodities presented each year may vary, but could include HACCP-based programs for dairy, poultry, fruit, and vegetables. Requirements for participating in an on-farm HACCP-based audit will be introduced.
AGRI 123 1 credit
Horticulture Skills and Techniques for Fall
Prerequisite(s): None
Practical horticulture work skills for the late summer and fall seasons. Complements lecture material from a variety of horticulture production courses. Course work will vary depending on the weather, but will include: propagation, fall turf maintenance, seeding, sodding, ornamental plant pruning, horticulture tool and equipment handling and maintenance, garden renovation, and greenhouse production and maintenance. Students must participate in outdoor labs, regardless of weather, as well as in the greenhouse. All students must have steel-toed work boots, rain gear, work gloves, hand pruners and a pocketknife. Off-campus field trips will be required at student expense.
AGRI 124 2 credits
Introduction to Horticulture
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces binomial nomenclature; the environmental factors affecting plant growth: physical, biological, and chemical control of plant growth, and an introduction to the major horticultural crop groups: fruits, vegetables, greenhouse crops, nursery crops, and turf.
AGRI 129 1 credit
Horticulture Skills and Techniques for Winter
Prerequisite(s): None
Practical horticulture work skills for the winter and spring season. Complements lecture material from a variety of horticulture courses. Course work may vary, depending on the weather, but will include: propagation, spring turf maintenance, fruit tree pruning, greenhouse production and maintenance work, garden renovation, planting and transplanting, irrigation system troubleshooting, and taxonomic keys. Students must participate in outdoor labs, regardless of the weather, as well as in the greenhouse. All students must have steel-toed work boots, rain gear, work gloves, hand pruners and a pocketknife. Off-campus field trips will be required at student expense.
AGRI 130 2 credits
Principles of Sustainable Agriculture Practices
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the scope of agricultural sustainability. Students will learn scientifically sound, practical agri-production information for low-input sustainable systems such as, but not limited to, certified organic production.
AGRI 133 1 credit
Introduction to Animal Health
Prerequisite(s): None
The students will study commercial production facilities and practices that lead to or prevent common livestock diseases. Conventional and new procedures used to prevent and control diseases will be covered.
AGRI 134 2 credits
Ruminant Animal Health
Prerequisite(s): None
Diseases of ruminant livestock: principles and treatment. Topics include reproduction, obstetrics, respiratory ailments, nutritional and infectious disease, and health management of dairy and beef cattle and other ruminants, as time permits.
AGRI 137 1 credit
Livestock Nutrition
Prerequisite(s): None
This course covers and integrates the basic facts concerning the nature of nutrients and their metabolism with the use of common feedstuffs on farms.
AGRI 138 3 credits
Swine Production
Prerequisite(s): None
This course covers feeding, breeding, and management for commercial and purebred swine operations. Topics include production, marketing, facilities, equipment, swine herd health and genetics. Students will be required to participate in the care of departmental livestock outside of regular class hours. Field trips are required. This course is only offered in even-numbered years.
AGRI 142 3 credits
Agribusiness Principles
Prerequisite(s): Students should be familiar with basic word processing, spreadsheets, electronic mail, and the worldwide web before entering this course. Those with limited or no experience with PCs should take CIS 100 or equivalent before enrolling in Agri 142
Corequisite(s): None
This course deals with the farm manager as a decision-maker. Topics include farm office, farm record-keeping and accounting, enterprise management, financial statements, cost accounting, break-even calculations, budgets, projections, production records, financial applications, and leverage. The use of computers to manage farm financial records (spreadsheets and data management programs) will be an integral part of this course.
AGRI 166 3 credits
Agri Pests: Insects & Weeds
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces students to insect pest and weed problems common in B.C. agriculture. Beneficial insects and their role in agriculture will also be covered. Students will learn how a basic IPM program can be used to control weeds and insects. The course uses lectures, laboratories and some field work, as well as several guest speakers. Students may be required to prepare a weed and insect collection. Students may also write the provincial pesticide licensing exam at the end of this course. A separate fee is required to write this exam.
AGRI 167 2 credits
Agri Pests: An Integrated Approach to Diseases
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces students to infectious and non-infectious diseases, commonly found in B.C. crops. Students will learn how a basic IPM program can be used to control infectious diseases. The organisms causing infectious diseases will be studied. Pesticide safety, including pesticide classification, mode of action, components, labels, and safe use and handling will be covered. Students may also write the provincial pesticide licensing exam at the end of this course. A separate fee is required to write this exam.
AGRI 183 1 credit
Farm and Equipment Safety
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Level I First Aid certificate is recommended
Corequisite(s): None
This course includes the safe operation of farm machinery and power equipment, an introduction to Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) in the workplace, and safety and fire prevention on the farm and in the workplace.
AGRI 192 3 credits
Practicum I
Prerequisite(s): Full-time status in one of the certificate or diploma agriculture programs, and consent of the Agriculture director
A three-week, on-the-job training course in agriculture. You will work, free-of-charge, for a selected host, in return for which you will gain valuable work experience and acquire new skills. Only full-time students who have successfully completed their current semester’s courses and have an overall GPA of 2.0 are eligible to participate. Students’ grades for this course will be based on hosts’ evaluations.
AGRI 194 3 credits
Practical Horticulture
Prerequisite(s): Full-time enrollment in Ornamental Horticulture certificate program or instructor’s permission
Students will become familiar with the horticultural aspects of grounds maintenance and greenhouse management, which may include some landscape construction techniques, pruning, fertilizing, planting/transplanting of landscape plant materials. Review of tools and equipment used in landscape maintenance work will be covered. Off-campus field trips are required, and students will be expected to work outdoors in inclement weather. All students must have their own steel-toed safety boots, rain gear, and work gloves. Work in the UCFV greenhouses will be required.
Students should budget approximately $35 for field trips.
AGRI 200 2 credits
Introduction to Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
Prerequisite(s): None
IPM will be covered as a concept used in agricultural systems. Emphasis is placed on the use of biological enemies, cultural and other management tools in closed production systems and in field fruit crop production. Methods of monitoring, data collection, and processing will be covered, as will the fundamentals of statistics and research as used in IPM. Students will be required to work in the UCFV greenhouses outside of class. Field trips are required.
AGRI 205 2 credits
IPM Techniques and Equipment
Prerequisite(s): None
Important pests in vegetable, turf and nursery crop industries will be studied, which will lead to an understanding of plant pathology and entomology as they affect these commodities. Emphasis will be placed on diagnosing, identification and recommendations for pest management. Guest lecturers will provide some specialized industry and research content. Field trips are mandatory. Work in the UCFV greenhouses will be required outside of class.
AGRI 207 3 credits
Solving Practical Problems in Agriculture
Prerequisite(s): Completion of year 1 of the diploma program or any of the one-year certificates offered by the UCFV department of agriculture
This course takes students to various agricultural enterprises for study. Current problems (case studies) will be presented for student analysis. Students will develop solutions for the problems. As well, students will learn the basic techniques needed for setting up, running, and evaluating research projects and demonstration plots. Off-campus field trips will be required. Students will have the opportunity to prepare for the International Certified Crop Advisors exam.
AGRI 210 2 credits
Directed Studies in Agriculture
Prerequisite(s): A minimum overall GPA of 2.50, second-year standing in the diploma program and instructor’s permission
Under the guidance of one of the agriculture faculty members, students may pursue a research project in agriculture. Regular reports will be required as the project develops, and a final written report must be presented to the supervising faculty member.
AGRI 211 2 credits
Soil Management and Conservation
Prerequisite(s): Agri 111
This course covers managing soil as a non-renewable resource. Topics will include practical soil management for farmers, the main processes of soil degradation — their causes and effects, soil conservation on the farm, tillage, interpretation of soil maps, and introduction to agricultural and engineering classification of soil for land use planning. Field trips will be required.
AGRI 220 2 credits
Plants in the Landscape
Prerequisite(s): None
This course covers the identification, use, and maintenance of herbaceous and woody plants in the landscape. Site selection and individual plant growing requirements will be emphasized. Students must have their own transportation. Field trips are a course requirement, and students should budget approximately $50 to cover travel costs throughout the semester.
AGRI 222 3 credits
Vegetable Crop Production
Prerequisite(s): None
Field production of commonly grown vegetable crops in British Columbia will be discussed. Topics will include site selection as influenced by environmental and economic conditions, field preparation, variety selection, and cultivation practices. The culture of mushrooms and ginseng are covered as an essential part of the course. Field trips may be required outside of regular class hours, including Saturdays. This course is only offered in even-numbered years. Students should budget approximately $35 for field trips.
AGRI 223 3 credits
Fruit Crop Production
Prerequisite(s): None
Field production of commonly grown fruit crops in British Columbia will be discussed. Topics will include site selection as influenced by environmental and economic conditions, field preparation, variety selection and cultivation practices. If time permits, the culture of some tropical fruit crops may be discussed. Field trips may be required outside regular hours, including Saturdays. This course is only offered in odd-numbered years. Students should budget approximately $35.00 for field trips.
AGRI 224 2 credits
Greenhouse Production
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will cover the basic structures, facilities and machines used, and review the production of the major florist and vegetable crops grown in the British Columbia greenhouse industry. Students are required to work in the UCFV greenhouse outside of regular class hours. Field trips may be required outside regular class hours, including early mornings and Saturdays. Bus fare of approximately $10 may be required.
AGRI 226 2 credits
Turfgrass Production
Prerequisite(s): None
Basics of production and maintenance of ornamental turfgrass is covered. Topics include soils, fertilizers, irrigation and drainage, seed and sod, seed bed preparation, mowing and mowing equipment, and a quick review of weeds, diseases, and insects, along with integrated pest management options for control. Final sessions will discuss the management of specialized turf areas, for example, golf courses. Practical, hands-on work in turf care will be included, weather permitting. Field trips may be required outside regular class time, including Saturdays.
AGRI 227 2 credits
Nursery Production and Propagation Practices
Prerequisite(s): None
The production of commonly grown nursery crops in British Columbia will be covered. Topics include propagation, site selection and preparation, and basic nursery management. Work in the UCFV greenhouse and grounds is required outside of regular class hours.
AGRI 228 2 credits
Forage Crop Production
Prerequisite(s): None
Production and use of commonly grown forage crops will be covered. Topics include forage establishment, maintenance, harvest, and storage. Emphasis will be on maximizing the use of homegrown forages to meet the nutritional requirements of today’s high-producing animals.
AGRI 230 2 credits
The Holistic, Sustainable Farm
Prerequisite(s): Agri 111, Agri 130
Corequisite(s): Agri 211 strongly recommended
This course will guide the student through an understanding of the inter-related social, environmental, and economic issues that are central to sustainable agriculture systems. Through case studies, sustainable agriculture practices will be examined to empower the students to plan for, and practice, holistic farming.
AGRI 231 2 credits
Dairy Production and Management
Corequisite(s): Agri 134 or instructor’s permission
The feeding, breeding, and nutrition of dairy animals; milk production, processing and marketing; and dairy farm facilities and management. Emphasis will be placed on dairy herd improvement through sound management and applied genetics. Students will be required to participate in the care of departmental livestock outside of regular class hours.
AGRI 232 3 credits
Beef Production
Prerequisite(s): None
Feeding, breeding and management of the beef animal. Topics include production, genetics and health, as well as marketing, facilities and equipment. Students will be required to participate in the care of departmental livestock outside of regular class hours. Field trips required. This course is only offered in odd-numbered years.
AGRI 235 2 credits
Production of Sheep, Goats and Other Livestock Species
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will introduce the management of small livestock species kept on farms in the Fraser Valley. Topics will range from husbandry to marketing of sheep, goats, rabbits, and other small livestock. Students will be required to participate in the care of departmental livestock outside regular class times. Field trips are mandatory.
AGRI 236 3 credits
Poultry Production
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will cover the poultry industry in Canada, mainly in the Fraser Valley at the farm level. The basics of feeding, breeding, and management of different types of poultry will be covered. Field trips and barn work will be mandatory. This course is offered only in odd-numbered years.
AGRI 238 3 credits
Equine Production and Management
Prerequisite(s): None
This course covers feeding, breeding, and management for horse owners. Topics include equine medical disorders, lameness, nutrition, facilities, reproduction management of both the mare and stallion, and equipment. Discussion of the different equine sectors and field trips will be included. This course is only offered in even-numbered years.
AGRI 242A 2 credits
Enterprise Project: Part I
Prerequisite(s): A C grade in Agri 142
Note: Students must meet the prerequisites for CMNS 250
Pre- or corequisite(s): CMNS 250
Using a PC, each student will develop an independent agricultural project which includes financing, budgeting, and operation for the first year of the enterprise. Students, in consultation with faculty, will begin preparation of the first year of a financial and operational analysis. A grade of credit must be achieved to be eligible to continue with part II.
AGRI 242B 2 credits
Enterprise Project: Part II
Prerequisite(s): Agri 242A: Part I with a grade of CR
Pre- or corequisite(s): CMNS 250
In part II of the course, students will complete their written enterprise project report and prepare it for presentation to a select committee of faculty and industry experts.
AGRI 270 3 credits
Global Issues in Agriculture
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will cover a broad range of topics such as world agricultural policies and their effect on food production, farm legislation, trade negotiations, and emerging alternative practices for commercial agricultural production. Exact topics may change, but this course will include discussion and guest speakers.
AGRI 292 3 credits
Practicum II
Prerequisite(s): Full-time status in one of the agriculture diploma programs and consent of the Agriculture director
A second three-week on-the-job training course in agriculture. You will work, free-of-charge for a selected host, in return for which you will gain valuable work experience and acquire new skills. Only full-time students who have successfully completed their current semester’s courses and have an overall GPA of 2.0 are eligible to participate. Students’ grades will be based on hosts’ evaluation.
AGRI 294 3 credits
Basic Landscape Design
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to residential landscape plan development, including practical application of plants commonly used in residential landscaping and investigation of various hard landscape applications as they apply to residential landscaping. Course materials will cost about $135.
Anthropology
Additional credits in anthropology
The following SCMS courses can be used for anthropology credit. Course descriptions are found under Social, Cultural, and Media Studies beginning on page 333.
• SCMS 255 — Introduction to Social Research
• SCMS 270 — The Dynamics of Racism in Canada
• SCMS 310 — Special Topics: Regional Studies in Latin America
• SCMS 355 — Quantitative Research Methods
• SCMS 356 — Qualitative Re search Methods
• SCMS 363 — Processes of Development and Under-Development in Latin America
• SCMS 387 — Canadian Native People
• SCMS 388 — Comparative Studies of Minority Indigenous Peoples
• SCMS 463 — Special Topics in Development Studies
• SCMS 468 — Environment and Society
• SCMS 470 — Race and Racism: Selected Topics
• SCMS 470A — Latin American Immigrants and Immigration
ANTH 101 3 credits
Human Origins
Prerequisite(s): None
This course traces our physical and cultural evolution by looking at our animal past, at our primate relatives (the prosimians, monkeys, and apes), and especially at the fossils and tools our ancestors have left behind. You will be introduced to the basics of evolution and to some of the basic questions physical anthropologists consider: Are we just naked apes? Are humans innately aggressive? Are sex roles built in or learned? Are some races superior to others?
ANTH 102 3 credits
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
Prerequisite(s): None
Anth 102 is an introduction to basic concepts, methods, and history of ideas of social and cultural anthropology. The emphasis is on understanding anthropological explanations of economic, social, and ceremonial activities of small-scale societies outside of the experience of most Canadians. The role of the study of languages in anthropology will also be discussed. Focused individual and group discussions based on assigned readings and study questions are an important part of Anth 102, and will be a part of classroom interaction. Expect to participate in class discussions of reading assignments and videos, and to write an essay.
Note: Anth 102 is a basic foundation course, and is a prerequisite to several upper-level Anthropology courses.
ANTH 111 3 credits
First Nations in British Columbia — Traditional Cultures
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the anthropological literature on the indigenous cultures of the coast and interior of the Pacific Northwest, with an emphasis on British Columbia. Topics include the archaeological record, languages, resource use, social structure, ceremonies, and culture change following the arrival of Europeans and the expansion of the Canadian state.
ANTH 112 3 credits
Aboriginal Peoples in B.C.: Contemporary Issues
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will focus on issues of importance to aboriginal communities in B.C. related to land claims, self-government, and various aspects of community development including education, family, health and wellness, and resource management, as well as urbanization. Relevant historical events, circumstances and/or current initiatives will be explored using key concepts and methods of analysis used by social scientists. Significant aspects of aboriginal/non aboriginal interactions, relationships, and experiences will be examined.
ANTH 130 3 credits
World Religions
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to world religions beginning with the search for religions essence (in ideas ranging from the Perennial Philosophy to the theories of Durkheim, Marx, Freud, and Jung) and continuing with an overview of indigenous religion (the Sto:lo, Hopi, and Tsembaga), and religions of the West (Judaism, Christianity, Islam), and the East (Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism). The course uses lectures, discussions, readings, and films to consider such questions as “What is religion? , “What does religion do for individuals?”, and “What is religion s place in today s world?
ANTH 210 3 credits
Kinship and Gender
Prerequisite(s): Anth 102 or Soc 101
Anthropology 210 is an introduction to studies of kinship and gender, using examples from a variety of societies and cultures. Topics may include social structure and kinship, the place of gender in stratification systems such as caste and class, ceremonies which emphasize gender, and the ways in which various social structures have changed. This course draws extensively on anthropological studies of small-scale and tribal societies.
ANTH 220 3 credits
Culture Change: People of the Third World
Prerequisite(s): None
Anthropology 220 looks at the lives of some of the people of the Third World  by considering case studies from Latin America. Particular attention is given to the peasantry (indigenous and non-indigenous), and to cultural changes within that group due to processes such as globalization, economic and technological change, population pressures and the availability of land, the commercialization of agriculture, colonization programs, the cocaine industry, migration, emigration, and urbanization.
ANTH 240 3 credits
Introduction to Archaeology
Prerequisite(s): None, Anth 101 recommended
An introduction to archaeological concepts and techniques, and an examination of the archaeological record of early societies throughout the world. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the archaeological and heritage record of British Columbia.
ANTH 268 3 credits
Culture and Environment
(formerly Anth 120)
Prerequisite(s): None, but either Soc 101 or Anth 102 is strongly recommended
Our world is facing an environmental crisis as a result of increasing population growth, water, soil, air, and noise pollution, and overuse of rural resources. Using anthropological models and methods of analysis, this course will explore the fundamental relationship between people and their environment. We will compare and contrast different cultural perspectives within our own industrial society, as well as among hunters and gatherers and tribal agriculturalists in other societies.
ANTH 301 4 credits
Key Ideas in Anthropology
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include Anth 102 and at least three additional credits of anthropology
A consideration of selected themes and ideas in anthropological thought with respect to their historical origins and theoretical importance.
ANTH 341 5 credits
Archaeology Field Methods: Applied Studies
Prerequisite(s): Anth 240 and permission of the instructor
Anthropology 341 is an application of archaeological techniques of excavation and interpretation of archaeological materials, based on participation in field excavation of an archaeological site. The course emphasizes archaeological techniques in a field situation, which will likely involve camping at, or commuting to, an off-campus site. Part of the course involves the analysis of materials in a laboratory. Anth 341 will normally be taught in the Spring semester to allow for fieldwork.
ANTH 469 4 credits
Myth and Ritual
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include Anth 102 and either Anth 130 or 301
This anthropological approach to myth and ritual looks at the connection between mythology, ritual, and lived experience. We will look at how myth has served as a universal factor in human existence, comparing it with other artistic representations such as poetry or drama. We shall explore mythology as a specific form of poetics that emerges out of human action and desires and also study the relationship between myth, ritual, and nature, and the unconscious.
ANTH 490 4 credits
Directed Readings in Anthropology
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least nine credits of anthropology plus permission from supervising faculty member and department head
Directed reading in a selected field of study under the direction of a faculty member. A major paper will be required.
Applied Business Technology
ABT 108 1.5 credits
Bookkeeping 2
Prerequisite(s): ABT 143 (formerly ABT 107)
This course focuses on accounting practices and procedures necessary for maintaining financial records for a merchandising business.
ABT 110 1.5 credits
Database Management: Access
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to database concepts, including data file creation, sort and query, editing, and report generation.
ABT 111 1.5 credits
Office Procedures
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to office policies and procedures, covering time management, information sources, telephone communications, postal information, office mail, human relations, and records management.
ABT 118 1 credit
Payroll
(formerly 107)
Prerequisite(s): ABT 143
This course is designed to enable a person with a basic knowledge of bookkeeping to perform any or all functions related to the maintenance of a payroll accounting system.
ABT 124 1.5 credits
Word Processing 3
Prerequisite(s): ABT 114
This course introduces students to advanced features in word processing and involves the student in critical thinking and problem solving.
ABT 128 1 credit
Computerized Bookkeeping
(formerly ABT 107)
Prerequisite(s): ABT 143
This course provides instruction and practice in the use of a computerized accounting package. Topics include general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, inventory, and project costing.
ABT 131 3 credits
Keyboarding
(formerly ABT 101 and ABT 102)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will provide students with a program designed to improve speed and accuracy in keyboarding. The Cortez Peters method of keying letter by letter is used.
Note: Course may be taken as ABT 131A and 131B for CTC students.
ABT 132 2 credits
WORK EXPERIENCE
ABT 133 4.5 credits
Word Processing: Word
(formerly ABT 103, most of ABT 114, and part of ABT 109)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces learners to basic word processing concepts using Microsoft Word software. Topics include activities related to creating, opening, saving, and editing documents; formatting, and working with tables and columns. More advanced applications include macros, outlines, merge commands, graphics, and style creation. Practice and instruction is provided for integrating data from other sources.
Note: Course may be taken as ABT 133A and 133B for CTC students.
ABT 134 1.5 credits
Word Processing 4
Prerequisite(s): ABT 109
This course will introduce students to basic and advanced word processing features using WordPerfect software.
ABT 135 4.5 credits
Business English and Communications
(formerly ABT 121 and ABT 130)
Prerequisite(s): None
This 4.5 — credit course provides a review of grammar, spelling, and punctuation as they relate to letters and other business documents. Students will be introduced to planning and writing effective positive, neutral, and negative messages, including e-mail. They will analyze writing situations and apply appropriate style, strategy, and basic writing principles to typical office correspondence. Editing and proofreading skills will be emphasized. Students will also prepare employment communications, be introduced to both traditional and electronic resumes, participate in a mock interview, and deliver a short oral presentation. This course helps students develop the oral, written, and group skills necessary to achieve success in the workplace.
ABT 137 3 credits
Spreadsheets: Excel
(formerly ABT 105 and ABT 106)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students with instruction and practice (including basic and advanced skills) required to use a spreadsheet program: designing and using worksheets to make business decisions, using formulas and functions, applying formatting techniques to create professional-looking worksheets, creating charts, working with lists, linking with other programs, and creating complex workbooks.
Note: Course may be taken as ABT 137A and ABT 137B for CTC students.
ABT 143 3 credits
Bookkeeping
(formerly ABT 107)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course covers the accounting cycle for a service business organized as a sole proprietorship and examines the accounting practices related to a business of that nature. Introduction to a computerized accounting package is included.
ABT 144 1.5 credits
Desktop Publishing Basics
Prerequisite(s): ABT 114 or ABT 124 with instructor’s permission
This is an introductory course that provides the techniques for creating attractive and useful newsletters, forms, and other business applications. Design of and procedures for creating a simple web page are included.
ABT 187 3 credits
Work Experience
(formerly ABT 132)
Prerequisite(s): All other certificate requirements for ABT must be met before a student is placed in Work Experience. This requirement may be waived at the discretion of the instructor.
This course provides students with real life experiences in an office. Students will spend three weeks taking on a variety of typical office tasks in offices of companies/agencies that the Applied Business Technology program liaises within the community.
Architectural Drafting
ADT 1 8 credits
Drafting Fundamentals and CAD
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Architectural Drafting Technician program
This course is designed to allow the learner to develop the skills to communicate through technical graphics. This ability is strengthened throughout the remainder of the program. Graphics will be produced by using hand sketches, drafting boards and computers (AutoCAD 2005). Mechanical drawing conventions are primarily used in this course. Skills gained are easily transferred to subsequent architectural drawings.
ADT 2 2 credits
Applied Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Architectural Drafting Technician program
This course builds on secondary school algebra, trigonometry and geometry. Problems are related to practical applications. Quizzes and exams are formatted primarily in a word problem format.
ADT 3 10 credits
Building Construction 1
Prerequisite(s): ADT 1 and ADT 2
This course is an introduction to the materials and methods used in the construction industry. Emphasis is placed on the wood frame residential structure, and the architectural drafting standards used to produce construction details and working drawings.
ADT 4 9 credits
Building Construction 2
Prerequisite(s): ADT 1 and ADT 2
This course builds on material introduced in ADT3 and applies it to specific projects. Structural knowledge is developed and applied for two and three storey wood frame projects. A general knowledge of basic plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems is gained. Design principles and space planning for residential projects are introduced. This course develops the student’s ability to communicate this knowledge through graphics, both technical working drawings and presentational graphics. This course also includes an introduction to Part 3 of the B.C. Building Code and its application as well as the application of local bylaws.
ADT 5 2 credits
Final Architectural Project
Prerequisite(s): ADT 3 and ADT 4
This course is a self directed project based on residential design work developed individually in ADT4. The student will produce a complete set of working drawings which could be issued for a building permit and construction.
ADT 6 1 credit
Introduction to Structures
Prerequisite(s): ADT 1 and ADT 2
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the principles of forces in equilibrium. Through working with structural problems involving beam design and analyzing loads the student will gain a basic understanding of the concerns involved with engineering problems.
ADT 7 5 credits
Civil Drafting and Surveying
Prerequisite(s): ADT 1 and ADT 2
This course is an introduction to the drafting required to place a structure on a building site. This includes an introduction to construction surveying, layout of road alignment and services.
Art History
AH 101 3 credits
History of Western Art to 1400
Prerequisite(s): None
Art is an integral part of the society that produces it. This introduction to art history is designed to foster knowledge, understanding and an appreciation of art and architecture from prehistoric cave painting to the Italian renaissance. Gallery visits supplement classroom experience.
AH 102 3 credits
History of Western Art: 1400 to the Present
Prerequisite(s): None
This course, which is best taken as a sequel to AH 101, continues to explore art and architecture in a social context from the renaissance to the contemporary era. The course focuses on understanding how artistic production changed in the centuries leading up to the modern era as well as the radical re-definitions of art that occurred in the 20th century. Gallery visits supplement classroom experience.
AH 205 3 credits
Art Practices and Popular Culture I
Prerequisite(s): AH 102 and one VA course
An examination of popular culture in relation to contemporary art-making practices, emphasizing the cross-fertilization of “fine” and “popular” art in recent decades. Students will be required to complete both studio and written projects for this course.
This course is also offered as VA 205. Credit cannot be obtained for both AH 205 and VA 205.
AH 210 3 credits
Art Practices and Popular Culture II
Prerequisite(s): AH 102 and one VA course
This course, which may best be taken as a sequel to AH 205, continues to examine popular culture in relation to contemporary art-making practices, emphasizing the social and political role of the artist. Students will be required to complete both studio and written projects for this course.
This course is also offered as VA 210. Credit cannot be obtained for both AH 210 and VA 210.
AH 230 3 credits
Issues in Exhibition
Prerequisite(s): Any three credits of lower level AH
This course offers a ‘hands on’ introduction to how institutions, physical and ideological, express and determine public taste. It is a one semester course of independent study with a study tour experience that may vary from weekend tours of local galleries to tours of ten days to 3 weeks of national or international sites. Students will analyze curatorial objectives, elements of display and supportive exhibition materials.
AH 311 4 credits
Arts in Context: The Italian Renaissance
Prerequisite(s): AH 101
This course focuses on the art and architecture of Renaissance Italy. Works of art will be examined according to their historical context, taking into consideration the dominant political, religious, and social concerns of the period. The relationship of the visual arts to literature and music will also be explored.
AH 313 4 credits
Arts in Context: Romanticism
Prerequisite(s): AH 102
A study of the visual, literary, and musical arts of the early 19th century Romantic movement. Emphasis will be placed on how these arts relate to the contemporary social and political context. Gallery visits supplement classroom experience.
AH 314 4 credits
Arts in Context: Modernism
Prerequisite(s): AH 102
This course offers a study of the visual arts of the 19th century to the second world war, with some reference to literary and musical form. The focus of the course will be on how the arts in Europe participated in the redefinition of the past and present in times of social and political upheaval. Gallery visits supplement classroom experience. Students might be interested in taking related courses in History and English.
AH 315 4 credits
Arts in Context: Contemporary
Prerequisite(s): AH 102
This course offers a critical analysis of the visual arts in the second half of the 20th century, with some reference to literary and musical forms. After the second world war and in the post colonial context, western culture experienced the strain of diversification as never before. The effect of postmodern developments and movements such as feminism will be regarded in relation to cultural production. Gallery visits supplement classroom experience.
AH 316 4 credits
Arts in Context: Gender, Art and Society
Prerequisite(s): AH 101 or 102
This course offers an analysis of gender and the visual arts in Western culture. The focus of the course will be on the work of women artists and the role of women as patrons and subjects. Analysis of visual production will also include ways in which gender is constructed and its relationship to class, race and sexuality. Works of art will be examined in relation to the social, political, religious and economic factors which influenced the production and reception of women’s art.
AH 320 4 credits
Art & Culture: Special Topics
Prerequisite(s): AH 101 or AH 102
The specific topic of this course will vary as opportunity permits (consult timetable), but students will encounter the artistic and cultural production of a non-western society (e.g., Haida, Japanese), or related group of societies (e.g., Oceanic or African) from an interdisciplinary perspective.
AH 330 4 credits
Museum Principles and Practices
Prerequisite(s): AH 101 or AH 102
This course offers students a general understanding of the principles and practices of museums by means of a study tour. It is a one-semester course of individual study with introductory lectures and seminars preceding a 10 day — 4 week study tour with field exercises and reviews. The course provides a theoretical and practical study of how museums perpetuate specific aesthetic, cultural and political interests. Students will gain an understanding of how galleries construct meaning and determine public taste by analysing exhibitions in terms of broad institutional mandate as well as specific curatorial objectives, issues of display and issues of reception.
Aviation
The seats in these courses are normally reserved for students in an Aviation program.
AV 150 0.5 credits
Fitness
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
Pilots must be in good physical health to maintain the medical requirements of a commercial licence. Fitness training is therefore an integral part of the Aviation program. Each fitness course consists of two physical fitness evaluations; a self-paced theory component assessed by quizzes, projects, and a final written exam; and a minimum attendance requirement of two sessions per week at a local fitness centre. The aim is to improve physical fitness and to develop good fitness habits for the future.
* AV 150 is a full-year course. AV 150A is normally offered Sept-Dec, and AV 150B follows. AV 150B must be taken in the same academic year as 150A. Students must take both to receive credit.
AV 151 1 credit
Fitness
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
Pilots must be in good physical health to maintain the medical requirements of a commercial licence. Fitness training is therefore an integral part of the Aviation program. Each fitness course consists of two physical fitness evaluations; a self-paced theory component assessed by quizzes, projects, and a final written exam; and a minimum attendance requirement of two sessions per week at a local fitness centre. The aim is to improve physical fitness and to develop good fitness habits for the future.
AV 152 1 credit
Fitness
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
Pilots must be in good physical health to maintain the medical requirements of a commercial licence. Fitness training is therefore an integral part of the Aviation program. Each fitness course consists of two physical fitness evaluations; a self-paced theory component assessed by quizzes, projects, and a final written exam; and a minimum attendance requirement of two sessions per week at a local fitness centre. The aim is to improve physical fitness and to develop good fitness habits for the future.
AV 161 2 credits
Introduction to Aviation
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course includes the theory needed to become a private pilot. It prepares students for the Transport Canada Private Pilot written examination and gives the necessary theory for the private licence flight training. Topics include air regulations, aerodynamics and theory of flight, airframes, engines and systems, flight instruments, flight operations, radio and electronic theory, navigation, meteorology, licensing requirements, pilot decision-making and human factors.
AV 162 2 credits
Flight Training, Private
Offered as 162A/162B
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course provides the aircraft and simulator training toward the private pilot licence. Completes all of Transport Canada’s minimum licensing requirements for the private pilot licence including cross country and instrument hours. The simulator portion introduces students to basic instrument flying and to radio aids to navigation. Flight Training, Private, is a full year course. AV 162A goes from Sept — Dec, and AV 162B follows. AV 162B must be taken in the same academic year as AV 162A.
* AV 162 is a full-year course. AV 162A is normally offered Sept-Dec, and AV 162B follows. AV 162B must be taken in the same academic year as 162A. Students must take both to receive credit.
AV 201 3 credits
Aviation Theory I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
A review of the theory received in the private pilot licence training, and an introduction to the subject matter that a commercial pilot must know in the areas of theory of flight, aircraft systems, regulation, meteorology and navigation.
AV 211 1 credit
Simulator — Instrument Procedures I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
In this course students are introduced to attitude instrument flying, basic instrument procedures, and navigation using the simulator. This course includes 12 sessions dual instruction and 12 sessions solo assignments in the flight training device.
AV 221 1.5 credits
Aircraft — Commercial I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course begins with a review of the basic flying skills of the student and then introduces attitude instrument flying procedures, and instrument flight navigation. This course includes 20 sessions dual instruction and 25 sessions solo assignments in the single-engine aircraft, and includes cross-country flying experience.
AV 231 1 credit
Human Factors I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This is an airmanship course which focuses on human factors associated with flight, including pilot judgement and decision-making. Students will learn that pilot judgement is a process which produces a thoughtful, considered decision relating to the operation of an aircraft, along with the response to the decision. This course also introduces the physiological factors that affect pilots and flight. Discussion of case studies is frequently used to point out the significance to the concepts which are introduced.
AV 251 1 credit
Fitness
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
Pilots must be in good physical health to maintain the medical requirements of a commercial licence. Fitness training is therefore an integral part of the Aviation program. Each fitness course consists of two physical fitness evaluations; a self-paced theory component assessed by quizzes, projects, and a final written exam; and a minimum attendance requirement of two sessions per week at a local fitness centre. The aim is to improve physical fitness and to develop good fitness habits for the future.
AV 252 1 credit
Fitness
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
Pilots must be in good physical health to maintain the medical requirements of a commercial licence. Fitness training is therefore an integral part of the Aviation program. Each fitness course consists of two physical fitness evaluations; a self-paced theory component assessed by quizzes, projects, and a final written exam; and a minimum attendance requirement of two sessions per week at a local fitness centre. The aim is to improve physical fitness and to develop good fitness habits for the future.
AV 302 3 credits
Aviation Theory II
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course contains theory in the subject areas of aeronautics, meteorology, navigation, and power plants to bring students to a commercial pilot standard and prepare them for the Transport Canada commercial written examination, and an introduction to the concepts underlying the flying of an aircraft by reference solely to the instruments. During this course students will write the Transport Canada Commercial Pilot written exam.
AV 312 1 credit
Simulator — Instrument Procedures II
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course is a continuation of Aviation 211. It continues to develop the student’s instrument flying skills in the simulator to a single-engine instrument flight test standard. This course includes 12 sessions dual instruction and 12 sessions solo assignments in the flight training device.
AV 322 1.5 credits
Aircraft — Commercial II
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
A continuation of Aviation 221 and prepares the student for the commercial pilot flight test. This course includes 20 sessions dual instruction and 25 sessions of solo assignments in the single-engine aircraft.
AV 332 1 credit
Human Factors II
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course is a continuation of Human Factors I. One of the topics covered is the judgement and decision-making skills used in landing and other aspects of commercial and instrument flying. Also discussed are search and rescue, defensive flying, survival sense training, search and rescue techniques, and cockpit resource management concepts.
AV 350 0.5 credits
Fitness
Offered as AV 350A/350B
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
Pilots must be in good physical health to maintain the medical requirements of a commercial licence. Fitness training is therefore an integral part of the Aviation program. Each fitness course consists of two physical fitness evaluations; a self-paced theory component assessed by quizzes, projects, and a final written exam; and a minimum attendance requirement of two sessions per week at a local fitness centre. The aim is to improve physical fitness and to develop good fitness habits for the future.
* AV 350 is a full-year course. AV 350A is normally offered Sept-Dec, and AV 350B follows. AV 350B must be taken in the same academic year as 350A. Students must take both to receive credit.
AV 401 3 credits
Aviation Theory III
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course contains theory in: flight operations to provide students with professional insight into the proper handling of multi-engine aircraft; instruments and avionics, to review the aircraft instruments required for flight with emphasis on those required for instrument flight; instrument flying techniques, to increase students’ understanding of instrument flight procedures; meteorology, to give a detailed study of weather as it affects instrument flight; and navigation, beginning with a detailed look at the concepts underlying navigation, including the shape of the earth and the various map projections and a survey of flight planning considerations for northern areas.
AV 402 3 credits
Aviation Theory IV
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course provides students with insight into systems of complex, turbine-powered aircraft, an understanding of the implications of flying faster and larger aircraft, mastery of the instrument flying knowledge and techniques, an introduction to the weather of the upper atmosphere as well as significant problems such as wind shear and thunderstorms, and a discussion of the regulations and procedures that are involved in commercial flying and air carrier operations and the responsibilities of a commercial pilot. During this course students will write the Transport Canada Instrument Rating written exam, and will learn many of the topics covered on the Airline Transport Pilot Licence exam.
AV 403 1 credit
Jet Transportation systems and Operations
Prerequisite(s): Aviation 402
This course will provide a basic understanding of the normal operating procedures and checklists used in a jet transport aircraft. It introduces the systems of the Boeing 747 which are required to perform basic flight manoeuvres.
AV 404 3 credits
Advanced Aerodynamics and Operating Procedures
(formerly AV 340)
Prerequisite(s): Aviation 402
This course provides details of incompressible flow airfoil theory and wing theory, description of stall speed, drag, and basic performance criteria, stability, trim and control, and configuration changes in high and low speed conditions. Compressible flow theory is introduced as well as transonic and supersonic flight.
AV 405 3 credits
Advanced Jet Transport Systems and Performance
Prerequisite(s): Aviation 404
This course provides students with an appreciation for modern transport aircraft systems and performance: this includes understanding how electronic control and navigation systems work, their normal operation as well as their limitations. It includes becoming aware of the role, the operation and limitations of automation in aircraft. It also includes increasing the student’s understanding of large aircraft systems and advancing the ability to determine performance information of large aircraft.
AV 411 1 credit
Simulator — Multi-Engine
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course is to introduce students to multi-engine procedures, to review instrument flying procedures and also to introduce students to two person crew concepts. This course includes 14 sessions dual instruction and 13 sessions solo practice in multi-engine simulators.
AV 412 1 credit
Simulator — Crew Operations
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course continues to develop two person crew procedures and also develops advanced instrument flying skills. This course includes 16 sessions dual instruction and eight sessions solo practice in multi-engine simulators, and includes turbine operations.
AV 413 1 credit
Simulator — Jet Transport Operations I
Prerequisite(s): Aviation 412
In this course students will apply in the simulator what has been learned in Aviation 403. It is an introduction to the basic handling of large transport category jet aircraft. Students will carry out the multi-crew functions to accomplish the preflight preparations, the takeoff, climb, enroute, arrival, approach, and flight completion phases in the Boeing 747 jet transport simulator. This course includes five sessions in each position (Captain, First Officer, and Second Officer) in the simulator.
AV 414 1 credit
Simulator — Jet Transport Operations II
Prerequisite(s): Aviation 413
In this course students will develop further skills in the operation of jet transport aircraft, and will understand the aerodynamic implications of flying such aircraft: including importance of high and low speed limitations, the use and the limits of aerodynamic high lift devices, the effect of center of gravity position on flight performance and characteristics, and other implications. This will be completed on specific flight exercises completed in the B747 simulator. This course includes five sessions in each position (Captain, First Officer, and Second Officer) in the simulator.
AV 415 2 credits
Simulator — Jet Transport Operations III
Prerequisite(s): Aviation 414
This is the concluding course in jet transport operations. In this course the function and operation of systems will be experienced and student will also learn how to use long range navigation equipment and other automation and safety equipment on board jet transport aircraft. Students will be expected, as crew members, to conduct line-oriented simulations, keeping in mind airline operating considerations. This will be accomplished in 10 sessions in each position (Captain, First Officer, and Second Officer) in the B747 simulator.
AV 421 1.5 credits
Aircraft — Multi-Engine
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course introduces students to multi-engine aircraft, provides opportunity to develop skills to fly multi-engine aircraft in normal and abnormal situations, and prepares them for the multi-engine flight test. This course includes 13 sessions dual instruction and a flight test in multi-engine aircraft as well as one session dual instruction and seven sessions solo practice in single engine aircraft.
AV 422 1.5 credits
Aircraft — Instrument/Multi-Engine
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course provides students with the opportunity to develop instrument flying skills in multi-engine aircraft and prepares them to pass the instrument flight test. This course includes 15 sessions dual instruction in multi-engine aircraft and eight sessions solo practice in single engine aircraft.
AV 431 1 credit
Advanced Airmanship I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
In this course students are introduced to concepts needed to safely fly with a two or more person crew. Included are subjects such as effectively managing all the resources available to a crew, crew coordination, and the use of standard operating procedures. Aircraft systems are discussed and accident reports are analyzed to support the points made. This course serves as a preparation for simulator training and introduces psychological factors involved in flight training and social psychology as it relates to flight crew cooperation.
AV 432 1 credit
Advanced Airmanship II
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course continues the concepts introduced in Advanced Airmanship I. Included are cockpit resource management topics such as the effect of fatigue and stress on crew performance, communication, management styles and strategies and assertiveness. Documentation, ergonomics, and passengers are other points of discussion. Standard operating procedures as they relate to the King Air and King Air systems are also discussed. As well, there is a review of pilots’ liability and responsibility to themselves, their passengers, their company, and to others.
AV 451 2 credits
Theory — Instructor
Offered as AV 451A/451B
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to teach flying subjects and prepares the student for the Transport Canada Class IV Instructor Rating written exams and the ground portion of the Instructor Rating flight test.
* AV 451 is a full-year course. AV 451A is normally offered Sept-Dec, and AV 451B follows. AV 451B must be taken in the same academic year as 451A. Students must take both to receive credit.
AV 452 1 credit
Flight Instructor Practicum
Offered as 452A/452B
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Aviation program
This course provides students with the knowledge and experience needed to instruct students how to fly aircraft and to meet the standards of the Transport Canada Class IV Flight Instructor Rating flight test. This course includes 30 sessions of dual instruction on single engine aircraft.
* AV 452 is a full-year course. AV 452A is normally offered Sept-Dec, and AV 452B follows. AV 452B must be taken in the same academic year as 452A. Students must take both to receive credit.
Biology
BIO 071 2 credits
Life Science
Prerequisite(s): Individual CCP assessment
This half-semester course consists of science and technology in the areas of human biology and nutrition. Laboratory exercises are included.
BIO 083 4 credits
Pre-College Biology I (4,0,3)
Prerequisite(s): Science 10, or SCI 071, or both BIO 071 and CHEM 071, and CCP department permission.
Corequisite(s): CHEM 083 recommended
This is a pre-college level course designed for students who intend to enter university studies, health sciences, or technology courses. Topics include ecology as it relates to current environmental problems; cell structure, function and reproduction; and overview of simple organisms, such as algae, and their relationship to advanced life forms of plants and animals. An important component of the course is a series of laboratory sessions which reinforces classroom topics. A field trip is included as a course requirement.
BIO 093 4 credits
Pre-College Biology II
Prerequisite(s): Biology 12 with a C- or better; or BIO 083 or BIO 11 with a C+ or better, plus one of: Math11, UCFV Math 085, English 11, UCFV Engl 081, Chem 11 or UCFV Chem 083. Chemistry 11 or Chem 083 is highly recommended
A continuation of BIO 083. Chemical and molecular aspects of biology are introduced; mammalian body systems are investigated in detail. An investigation of energy exchanges, genetics, and developmental concepts. Offers some insight into current concerns such as genetic diseases, genetic engineering, cancer, and tissue manipulation. Course requirements include several laboratory sessions.
BIO 105 4 credits
Human Biology
Prerequisite(s): None
Note: Students with credit for any Biology course numbered above 110 are not allowed to take Biology 105/106 for further credit.
This course is designed for non-science students with an interest in the human organism. The course deals with human physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and basic ecology in lectures and laboratory. Some universities grant science credit toward Art degrees. Biology 105 cannot be used to meet the requirements for a Biology major, extended minor, or minor programs.
Note: Students with credit for any Biology course numbered above 100 are not allowed to take Biology 105 for further credit.
BIO 106 4 credits
Ecology and Basic Biology from an Urban Perspective
Prerequisite(s): None
Note: Students with credit for any Biology course numbered above 110 are not allowed to take Biology 105/106 for further credit.
This course is designed for non-science students with an interest in their own environment. The course will present concepts of basic biology and ecology in order to help students understand the natural environment and human influence on it. Topics will include lifecycles, biological adaptations, classification, and species distribution, using examples from organisms found in local urban and rural ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on enhancement of the urban environment for naturally occurring species. A weekend Streamkeepers course with a fee and a field project may be required. Biology 106 cannot be used to meet the requirements for a major, extended minor or minor programs in biology.
Note: Students with credit for any Biology course numbered above 100 are not allowed to take Biology 106 for further credit.
BIO 111 5 credits
Introductory Biology I
Prerequisite(s): Biology 12 and Chemistry 11
For majors in biology and for career programs such as dentistry, education, forestry, medicine, agriculture, etc., that require a rigorous treatment of current concepts in biology. The course will emphasize the molecular and cellular basis of life, biochemical processes, cellular structure and function, and genetics.
BIO 112 5 credits
Introductory Biology II
Prerequisite(s): Bio 111
Continues the study begun in Bio 111 of the principles of biology. This course includes a study of the interaction of organisms with one another and with their physical environment as they relate to the anatomy and physiology of plant and animal systems, the diversity of life on the planet, and evolution.
BIO 201 4 credits
Cell Biology I
Prerequisite(s): Either Bio 112 and Chem 213; or Bio 112 and Chem 114. Chem 213 strongly recommended. Chem 213 can be taken concurrently.
Note: Pre-requisites for Fall 2006 and onwards will be: Bio 112 and Chem 114. Chem 213 strongly recommended.
This course provides an introduction to the biochemistry, structure, and function of cellular components. The course opens with an exploration of biological macromolecules, enzymes, and energetics as the basis for interpretation of structure and function of cellular membranes and organelles. Students examine major pathways of chemotrophic and phototrophic metabolism in cells, mitochondria and chloroplasts, focusing on energy flow in the cell and its control. Lectures and integrated laboratory exercises emphasize the importance of experimental evidence underlying current understanding of cell structure and function.
BIO 202 4 credits
Cell Biology II
Prerequisite(s): Bio 201
A continuation of Cell Biology I, this course focuses on signal transduction in cells. Topics covered include: electrical and chemical signalling in cells, DNA structure and organization of the eukaryotic genome, DNA replication, the cell cycle and cancer, biotechnology and genetic engineering, gene expression, transcription and translation mechanisms, and control of gene expression.
BIO 203 4 credits
Microbiology I
Prerequisite(s): Bio 112, and one of Chem 112, Chem 114, or Chem 101, plus Chem 102 with a “B” or better in each.
An introduction to modern microbiology; provides a base in the fundamentals of microbial structure, bioenergetics, growth, and genetics, predominately by considering bacteria and viruses.
BIO 210 4 credits
Introduction to Ecology
Prerequisite(s): Bio 112
An introduction to the basic principles of ecological theory relating to the structure and function of ecosystems. This course includes field trips. A required overnight, weekend field trip will be held on the third weekend of the fall semester.
BIO 220 4 credits
Genetics
Prerequisite(s): Bio 112
An introductory genetics course dealing with the principles and concepts of transmission of genetic information in all living organisms.
BIO 270 4 credits
Introduction to Forensic Biology
Prerequisite(s): Five university transfer courses, one of which must be from the following list: Bio 105, Bio 106, Bio 111, Bio112 or Chem 150
This course introduces the student to the techniques involved in locating, processing and interpreting forensic scenes with human remains. Students will learn to interpret the effects of biological and environmental factors on forensic scenes. Students will learn basic osteology so that they can identify human remains, determine their sex, age, ancestry, and stature and correctly interpret any associated trauma to the bones. This course includes a required one-day field exercise. Students must have a current tetanus shot.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Crim 270 and Bio 270.
BIO 301 4 credits
Anatomy and Physiology of Invertebrates
Prerequisite(s): Bio 201 and 202, Bio 220
This course deals with physiological and anatomical adaptations of select invertebrate animals with an emphasis on principles of functional morphology. Life history, feeding and nutrition, respiration, excretion, reproduction, and development will be studied. This course includes a required overnight, weekend field trip.
BIO 303 4 credits
Anatomy and Physiology of Plants I
Prerequisite(s): Bio 201 and 202, Bio 220
A study of the relationship of plant structure and function. Emphasis is placed on modern interpretation of anatomical adaptations for nutrient and energy acquisition and transport of assimilated material. Laboratories are an integral part of the course.
BIO 304 4 credits
Anatomy and Physiology of Plants II
Prerequisite(s): Bio 303
This course looks at changes in anatomy and function during the plant life cycle. In lecture and laboratory, we will look at how plants perceive the environment. We will follow how they respond anatomically and physiologically to environmental signals and stresses.
BIO 305 4 credits
Anatomy and Physiology of Vertebrates I
Prerequisite(s): Bio 201 and 202
This course deals with physiological and anatomical adaptations of select vertebrate animals with an emphasis on basic physiological concepts and structure/function relationships within the vertebrate body plan.
BIO 306 4 credits
Anatomy and Physiology of Vertebrates II
Prerequisite(s): Bio 305
A continuation of the comparative anatomy and physiology of the vertebrates. Organ systems covered in this course include endocrine, digestive, excretory, reproductive, and lymphatic/immune.
BIO 310 3 credits
Conservation Biology
Prerequisite(s): Bio 210
This course examines both theoretical and practical aspects of conservation biology. Drawing from numerous biological fields, including ecology, population genetics, and evolution, this multidisciplinary approach seeks to investigate causes and extent of human impacts on the natural world and to develop practical solutions to prevent further declines. Upon successful completion of the course, students will have developed an excellent working knowledge of the global makeup of biological diversity and the threats that exist. They will be well versed in the various approaches and challenges to achieving realistic conservation goals on both local and global scales, and will be familiar with the different career opportunities open to conservation biologists.
BIO 312 3 credits
Developmental Biology
Prerequisite(s): Bio 201 and 202, Bio 220
Embryonic development is studied at various levels: organismal, cellular, molecular and genetic. Both classical and modern experimental approaches using several model species will be described.
BIO 320 3 credits
Biochemistry
Prerequisite(s): Bio 201, Bio 202, and Chem213
This course deals with the structures, function and metabolic interactions of lipids, steroids, vitamins, nucleotides, nucleic acids, and amino acids. DNA replication, transcription, and protein synthesis as well as regulatory aspects of these processes will also be discussed.
BIO 325 4 credits
Introductory Medical Microbiology
Prerequisite(s): Bio 201, Bio 203
Corequisite(s): Bio 202
The course focuses on the relationship between human health and microbes. The functioning of the immune system, the normal human flora, and diseases caused by microbial pathogens will be studied.
BIO 330 4 credits
Plants and Animals of British Columbia (3,0,3)
Prerequisite(s): Bio 210
An introduction to some of the most common species of plants, birds, and mammals of British Columbia. Through lecture, laboratory experience, and field trips, students will learn systematic identification of major groups of organisms. The biology of organisms will be discussed with respect to their specific environment. Students will be expected to take part in a weekend field trip.
BIO 340 4 credits
Population and Community Ecology
Prerequisite(s): Bio 210, Math 111 and Math 112
Corequisite(s): None
This course will focus on how both biotic and abiotic environments influence the ecological adapation of organisms. We will examine population processes related to differential natality, mortality, and dispersal in relation to these adaptations. Community aspects, such as competition and predation, and abiotic conditions that generate the observed patterns of plant and animal distribution and abundance will be examined. Patterns of community structure, including diversity, stability, biogeography, dominance, and succession, will be studied in the field. Case studies and mathematical models will be used to examine quantitative and qualitative adjustments of populations to their environments.
BIO 360 4 credits
Insect Biology
Prerequisite(s): Any two Biology courses numbered 200 and above
Corequisite(s): None
A study of basic insect anatomy, physiology, and taxonomy. Organ systems covered in this course will include integumentary, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, reproductive, and endocrine. A survey will be made of major insect orders and families including human impact, behaviour, and ecology where appropriate. This course will include field trips and an insect collection will be required.
BIO 401 3 credits
Molecular Biology I
Prerequisite(s): Either Chem 213 and Chem 214; OR one of: Bio 304, Bio 312, Bio 320 or Bio 325.
Note: Pre-requisites for Fall 2006 and onwards will be: One of Bio 304, Bio 312, Bio 320 or Bio 325.
A study of advanced problems and concepts on topics such as cell organization, cell function, and the control of cell division and growth. Students will be required to participate in class seminars designed to analyze the recent scientific literature on topics related to the molecular biology of cells.
BIO 402 3 credits
Molecular Biology II
Prerequisite(s): Bio 401
A study of advanced problems and concepts on topics such as abnormal cell growth, the molecular basis of immunity, and the molecular biology of the nervous system. Students will be required to participate in class seminars designed to analyze the recent scientific literature on topics related to the molecular biology of cells.
BIO 403 3 credits
Molecular Techniques I
Prerequisite(s): Bio 202, Bio 220, Bio 203 and one of Bio 312, Bio 320, Bio 325 or Bio 401
This is an intensive practical laboratory course that provides students with an applied introduction to the methodology used in recombinant DNA technology. The course encompasses an integrated series of molecular biology laboratory exercises that involve the cloning and analysis of the bioluminescence genes from a marine bacterium. The course focuses on the basic techniques of modern molecular biology including: DNA isolation and restriction analysis, agarose gel electrophoresis, ligations, transformation of recombinant DNA, preparation and screening of a genomic library, and Southern blotting and hybridization. The course is appropriate as a molecular biology component of Microbial Genetics, Genetics, Biochemistry, or Advanced Microbiology programs of study.
After completing the course students will be comfortable in a laboratory setting and will be prepared for careers in research or the biotechnology/pharmaceuticals industry.
BIO 406 3 credits
Advanced Genetics
Prerequisite(s): Bio 220 and one of the following: Math 104, 106, 270 or Psyc 201
This course provides for a detailed discussion of the molecular basis and practical aspects of genetic recombination and mutation. The influence of genetic change through mutation and recombination on populations and quantitative traits will also be discussed.
BIO 408 3 credits
Directed Studies in Biology I
Prerequisite(s): B+ average in Bio 202, Bio 210, Bio 220, and permission of instructor required
The course is designed for students pursuing a biology major or minor. Students will have an opportunity to apply scientific principles in a creative hands-on research experience outside the usual course format. Students will develop their own projects in biology under the supervision of a faculty member with expertise in the field. Bio 408 is designed to accommodate projects that are equivalent in weight and difficulty to a single upper-level course.
Students enrolled in biology majors and minors will receive credit for only one of Bio 408 or Bio 409.
BIO 409 6 credits
Directed Studies in Biology II
Prerequisite(s): B+ average in Bio 202, 210, 220, and permission of instructor
Bio 409 is similar to Bio 408, but is designed to accommodate more ambitious projects.
BIO 416 3 credits
Evolution
Prerequisite(s): Bio 210 and Bio 220, and either Bio 312 or Bio 320
An investigation of the mechanisms and processes of the evolution of biological organisms. The history and development of evolutionary thought and contemporary issues are discussed.
BIO 420 3 credits
Special Topics in Biology
Prerequisite(s): Any three Biology courses numbered 200 or above, or permission of the instructor
Students will have an opportunity for an in-depth investigation of specialist areas in biology, under the guidance of an expert in the field. Students must check with the Biology department to determine course availability and content area for a particular semester.
BIO 470 4 credits
Advanced Forensic Biology
Prerequisite(s): Crim 270 or Bio 270
This course further develops the investigative techniques and methodology of forensic biology. Topics of further study will include the investigation and methods of processing and interpreting human remains. Students will use biological and physical features of the environment to interpret remains recovered from buried, scattered, underwater (ocean and freshwater), and arson scenes. Advanced studies will examine juvenile and developmental osteology. New advancements in the field involving DNA and individualizing techniques will also be examined. This course includes a required one-day field exercise. Students must have a current tetanus shot and steel toed boots.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Crim 470 and Bio 470.
Business Administration
Many of the seats in these courses are normally reserved for students in a business administration program.
Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space.
Explanation of transferability symbols:
CA Institute of Chartered Accountants of B.C.
CCUI Canadian Credit Union Institute
CGA Certified General Accountants Association of B.C.
CMA Society of Management Accountants of B.C.
ICB Institute of Canadian Bankers
MUN Municipal Administrators’ Education Council
PMAC Purchasing Management Association of Canada
WWU Western Washington University
Students should obtain detailed information about the conditions under which courses are transferable to other institutions. Because receiving institutions determine transferability, the information provided in this section regarding transferable courses is subject to change without notice. Please refer to the B.C. Provincial Transfer Guide (www.bccat.bc.ca) or contact the receiving institution for details about transferability.
Note: Most of the courses listed below are transferable to the OU Bachelor of Administrative Studies (BAS).
BUS 100 3 credits
Introduction to Business
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces students to basic business concepts and processes, and to the major issues involved in the management and administration of organizations. Topics covered include the Canadian business system, the Canadian economy, and the business functions of production, management, finance, and human resource management. The course is designed for students with minimal experience in basic business terminology and practices. It is highly recommended that students take this course in the first semester of study.
Students with Bus 102 cannot take Bus 100 or Bus 202 for further credit.
BUS 120 3 credits
Essentials of Marketing
Prerequisite(s): None
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 100 or Agri 242A (Students in programs other than Business may seek a prerequisite waiver from the department)
Transferability: PMAC
An introductory survey course which examines the marketing environment and the fundamental principles underlying the selling of consumer and industrial goods and services. The course also examines market research, product planning, selection of trade channels and merchandising, advertising, pricing, promotion, and selling techniques. Case studies are used extensively to emphasize fundamental principles.
BUS 143 3 credits
Accounting I
Prerequisite(s): C+ or better in Principles of Math 11; Math 12 recommended
Corequisite(s): Bus 100 recommended
Transferability: CMA, CGA, CCUI, PMAC, CA
This course will emphasize the practical application of accounting and will include the following topics: nature and purpose of accounting; balance sheet; income statement, changes in equity statement, accounting cycle, internal control; specialized journals; accounting for cash, receivables, inventories, and payroll liabilities; and accounting principles and concepts. The course may use a computerized accounting package.
BUS 144 3 credits
Accounting II
Prerequisite(s): Bus 143; C+ or better in Principles of Math 12 provincially examined; or Math 110 (C+ or better); Bus 162 recommended
Transferability: CMA, CGA, CCUI, PMAC, CA
This course is a continuation of Bus143. Topics include capital assets, current and long-term liabilities, partnerships, corporations, organization and shareholders equity, earnings per share, dividends, retained earnings, bonds and long-term notes payable, investments (including cost and equity method of accounting), international accounting, statement of cash flows, and interpretations of financial statements. The course may include the use of a computerized accounting package.
BUS 145 3 credits
Accelerated Financial Accounting
Prerequisite(s): C+ or better in Principles of Math 12 provincially examined; or Math 110 (C+ or better); Bus 162 recommended.
Corequisite(s): Bus 100 recommended
Transferability: CA, CMA, CGA
Topics include the nature and purpose of accounting, balance sheet, income statement, changes in equity statement, accounting cycle, internal control; specialized journals; accounting for cash, receivables, inventories, capital assets; the partnership entity; the corporate entity; short and long-term liabilities; bonds and long-term notes payable, investments and international accounting; statement of cash flows, and financial analysis.
BUS 160 3 credits
Computerized Business Applications
Prerequisite(s): Familiarity with Windows is essential for success in this course. Students should consult the CIS web page at www.ufv.ca/cis/ for details. CIS 100 with a grade of C or better is recommended
Transferability: CGA, CMA, CA, CCUI
Designed for students with a basic foundation in the use of microcomputer software applications. Students will accelerate directly into the use and integration of some of the more advanced features of applications such as word processing, electronic worksheets, database management, and visual and graphic software as well as electronic mail and the internet. Emphasis is on using computers to analyze and solve problems in a business environment.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Bus 160 and CIS 110.
BUS 162 3 credits
Mathematical Methods For Business
Prerequisite(s): C+ or better (67%) in Principles of Math 12 (provincially examined); or Math 110 (C+ or better); (see program entrance requirements)
Transferability: CA
This course covers the mathematics of finance, a pre-calculus review of functions and graphs and an introduction to linear programming. Mathematical applications to retail operations, simple and compound interest, discounts, annuities, financial papers and depreciation methods are covered. Emphasis is on applications to financial management with the use of relevant computer software.
BUS 201 3 credits
Human Resource Management
Prerequisite(s): Bus 203
Transferability: CCUI
This course involves the study of recruitment, selection and placement; job descriptions and job evaluation; compensation and appraisal plans, employment benefit programs, and training and educational programs.
BUS 202 3 credits
Contemporary Management
Prerequisite(s): Students with minimal business experience are strongly encouraged to take Bus 100 (Introduction to Business) prior to taking Bus 202
This course involves detailed study of the functions of management, including planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Topics covered include the context of management, the planning process, decision-making, organizational structure, leadership, motivation, and the control process. Applications and problem solving in the real-life business context will be emphasized. This course is designed for working managers and for students who want exposure to management skills and practices. Business diploma students intending to take the Human Resources and Organization Studies (HROS) concentration in the Bachelor of Business Administration degree program should consider taking BUS 202 as an elective in the diploma program. Students with Bus 102 cannot take Bus 100 or Bus 202 for further credit.
BUS 203 3 credits
Organizational Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): Bus 100 or Bus 102 (CIS and Crim program students may obtain Business department permission for prerequisite exemption)
Transferability: CA, CMA
This course consists of a general overview of the behaviour of individuals and groups, especially as this behaviour relates to formal organizations. It is designed to familiarize students with basic theories and concepts from the social sciences. Students will have an opportunity to participate in a variety of structured learning experiences where these theories can be studied and the concepts applied.
BUS 206 3 credits
Business Policy
Prerequisite(s): (Bus 100 or 102), Bus 120, (Bus 144 or 145), (Bus 160 or CIS 110)
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 201, Bus 247
Transferability: CCUI, PMAC
An examination of how management set objectives of a business organization and the importance of planning and control to achieve these objectives. It includes an examination of long- and short-range goals and objectives, policy formation, rules and procedures, and decision-making using business simulation.
BUS 221 3 credits
Professional Selling
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 100 recommended
An introduction to professional selling. Emphasis is placed on practical problems of locating and qualifying prospects, use of the depth approach, and improving sale preparation and organization.
BUS 222 3 credits
Sales Management
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 100 recommended
General principles of sales management. Emphasis is placed on human resources, and on selection, assimilation, training and supervision. An examination of sales research, planning, organization and analysis constitutes the core of the course. The course ends with a discussion of sales management ethics.
BUS 223 3 credits
Advertising
Prerequisite(s): Bus 120 or Bus 121/122
Transferability: CCUI
This course covers several advertising-related topics including philosophy and purpose, organization, relationship to other business divisions, planning, management, the creative process, research, media, copy, layout, art, strategies and campaigns, production and communications, controls, and evaluation of results.
BUS 224 3 credits
Retail Management
Prerequisite(s): Bus 120 or 121/122
A study of retail management principles applicable to both large and small scale operations. Areas dealt with normally include the consumer, market segmentation, location, store design, space utilization, organization structure, personnel management, merchandise presentation and display, personal selling, customer services, and expense control and merchandising.
BUS 227 3 credits
New Business Development
Prerequisite(s): Bus 120, (Bus 160 or CIS 110), Bus 144 or 145), Bus 162, (Bus 100 or Bus 102) CMNS 125 and 250
A comprehensive course in how to establish a small business. Topics include buying a business, franchises, starting your own business, sources of financing, forms of business, determining location, and the management strategies of marketing, fiancé, production, inventory control and human resources. This course concludes with the development of a business plan.
BUS 247 3 credits
Management Accounting
Prerequisite(s): Bus 144 or 145 with C+ or better, and (Bus 160 or CIS 110); C+ or better in Math 12 or Applications of Mathematics 12, or Math 109 with B or better; Bus 162 recommended
Transferability: CA, CMA, CGA
An introduction to management accounting. Topics include cost/volume/profit relationships and analysis; job order and process costing; spoilage & waste; budgeting and responsibility accounting; flexible budgets; standard costs; materials, labour, overhead; cost behaviour; relevant costing and capital budgeting; direct and absorption costing.
BUS 261 3 credits
Business Law
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into Business Administration program
Transferability: CA, CMA, CGA
Beginning with an overview of the sources of law and court procedures, this course explores torts and focuses on contract law. The material covered provides a sound definition of contract law as well as examining specific contractual arrangements, including securities, real estate transactions and general business transaction. Students will also be exposed to laws relating to business organizations, such as partnerships and corporations.
BUS 301 4 credits
Economic and Business Statistics
Prerequisite(s): Econ 100, Econ 101 and Math 106, acceptance to BBA degree
Corequisite(s): One of Math 111 or 115 (may be taken as a prerequisite)
A practical second course in statistics, using statistical software packages, that applies statistical principles to problems in economics and business.
The course includes an overview of sampling techniques to aid market research, an introduction to multiple regression and time series analysis with an emphasis on forecasting, decision theory and the construction of price indices. All students are expected to complete a project applying at least one of the course techniques to a real data set.
BUS 304 3 credits
Organization Theory and Application
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree; Bus 203; Bus 100 or Bus 102 recommended
This course consists of a survey of organizations and their environments, strategies, structures, systems, change and redesign from a mostly contingency perspective. Topics also include organization-level phenomena such as power, politics, decision making, culture, technology and information processing. Through cases, readings, and life experiences, students will be given the opportunity to apply these concepts, and evaluate their use in interpreting and managing organizational problems and situations.
BUS 305 3 credits
Industrial Relations
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or BBA Aviation degree; Bus 201
This course is an introduction to labour relations and a basis for more specialized study. The course presents a critical analysis of labour-management relations in the workplace, its institutional and legal framework, and the organization and objectives of unions and management. The course should interest trade unionists and managers wanting to develop analytical skills relevant to and necessary for a career in labour relations, and those wanting to better understand and participate in the labour relations of their own workplace.
BUS 307 3 credits
Selected Topics in Organizational Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree and Bus 203
The specific emphasis in this course may vary depending on the special interests of faculty. Normally, the course will consist of an in-depth review of specific organizational theories and problems.
BUS 308 3 credits
Selected Topics in Applied Organization Theory
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree and Bus 304
This course provides an in-depth examination of selected organization theory topics such as (but not restricted to) organizational learning, re-engineering, cultural change, institutional theory, bureaucracy, power, and enacted reality. Using course concepts, activities within and between contemporary organizations can be interpreted and form the basis of managerial analysis and action recommendations.
BUS 309 3 credits
Selected Topics in Human Resources Management
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Bachelor of Business Administration degree, and Bus 201
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 304
The specific emphasis in this course will vary depending on the interests of the faculty and the contemporary issues in human resource management. Some of the human resource topics, each of which would form the basis for a special topics course, are: selection and recruitment, human resources planning, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, and training and development. The course will be presented through readings exercises, role plays, and case studies.
BUS 320 3 credits
Business Research Methods
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 301
This course examines different research methodologies and their applicability to various business research problems. Emphasis is placed upon survey research. Students will be expected to complete a major research project, which includes research design, questionnaire construction, data collection, data analysis and report writing. Computer software will be used for statistical analysis.
BUS 321 3 credits
Business-to-Business Marketing
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 320
This course will expose students to managerial problems and challenges faced by organizations that are in the business of marketing industrial products, services, and commodities to other businesses. The specific focus will be on the nature of the firms’ offerings and the specialized channels of distribution.
BUS 323 3 credits
Promotion Management
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 320
The emphasis of this course is on the planning, designing, organizing and managing of the promotional mix. The focus will be on key elements such as advertising, sales promotions, public relations, and media channels.
BUS 327 3 credits
Consumer Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree
Corequisite(s): Bus 320 (may be taken as a prerequisite)
The purpose of the course is to study the process of consumer choice, its determinants, and its implications for marketing strategy. The study of consumer behaviour is interdisciplinary; that is, it is based on concepts and theories about people that have been developed by researchers in such diverse disciplines as psychology, sociology, social psychology, cultural anthropology, and economics. Given this fact, the course will focus on how firms can use their knowledge of consumer behaviour to segment markets, design marketing communications, and measure marketing performance.
BUS 338 3 credits
Accounting Information Systems
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or Accounting certificate, Bus 144 or 145, and Bus 160 or CIS 110 or equivalent with instructor’s permission
Basic concepts of accounting information systems; fundamentals of computer hardware and software; recording and storing data; international control; impact of EDP on accounting systems; methodology for system development; special topics related to accounting information systems; introduction to accounting-related software with an emphasis on hands on applications.
BUS 343 3 credits
Intermediate Accounting I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or Accounting certificate program; C+ or better in Principles of Math 12 provincially examined; or Math 110 (C+ or better); Bus 144 or 145 with C+ or better
Corequisite(s): Bus 160 or CIS 110
This course, together with Bus 344, further develops the concepts, practices, and techniques, presented in Bus 143/144. Topics include theoretical foundations of accounting, measurement and reporting of financial information, cash, receivables, inventories, operational assets, intangible assets, investments — temporary and long-term, revenue recognition, financial reporting, and changing prices.
BUS 344 3 credits
Intermediate Accounting II
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or Accounting certificate program; Bus 343 or equivalent with instructor’s permission
This course represents a continuation of the financial accounting subject matter presented in Business 343. Topics include liabilities, retained earnings, shareholders equity, earnings per share, accounting for taxes, pensions, leases, changes in financial position, financial statement analysis, and disclosure requirements.
BUS 345 3 credits
Income Tax I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or Accounting certificate program; Bus 144 or 145, or equivalent with instructor’s permission
This course provides an introduction to the Canadian system of income taxation of individuals and corporations. Specific study concentrates on the Income Tax Act and includes such topics as employment income, income from business, income from property, income for tax purposes, eligible deductions, capital cost allowances, capital gains, taxable income and taxes payable.
BUS 346 3 credits
Income Tax II
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or Accounting certificate program; Bus 345
This course provides a continuation of Bus 345. Specific study concentrates on the Income Tax Act and how it applies to corporations, trusts and other entities. The discussion will be supplemented with the use of income tax software.
BUS 347 3 credits
Auditing Principles
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or Accounting certificate program; Bus 344
This course is an introduction to the principles of auditing. Topics include: the nature and purpose of the audit function, an overview of the auditing profession, audit methodology, planning, and standards (including audit objectives, types of evidence and documentation, materiality and risk, internal controls and audit sampling and testing); audit reports, and coverage of current auditing controversies.
BUS 348 3 credits
Management Accounting II
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or Accounting certificate program; Bus 247 and Math 106, or equivalent, with instructor’s permission, C+ or better in Principles of Math 12 provincially examined, or Math 110 (C+ or better)
This course covers cost behaviour, relevance and the decision process, pricing decision, management control systems, cost allocation, profit planning in uncertainty and the use of decision models, specifically inventory models, product mix using linear programming, models in capital budgeting, cost behaviour analysis/regression analysis, and variance analysis mix and yield.
BUS 349 3 credits
Financial Management I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or BBA Aviation or Accounting certificate program; C+ or better in Principles of Math 12 provincially examined; or Math 110 (C+ or better); Bus 144 or 145 with C+ or better; Bus 247;Bus 162 recommended
This course covers the role and objectives of financial management, working capital management, portfolio management, capital budgeting, security valuation, financing by debt or equity, optimal levels of debt, dividends and dividend policy.
BUS 350 3 credits
Operations Management
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or BBA Aviation or CIS degree program, Math 106, and one of (Math 111 or 115), or instructor’s permission. Aviation students without Math 111, 115 will require tutorial instruction in calculus
A survey of the production function in business with emphasis on inventory management, project management, and quality control. Particular emphasis will be placed on how managers can use computers in manufacturing operations to help them in decision making. Field trips may be required.
BUS 360 3 credits
International Air Transportation
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Bachelor of Business Administration (Aviation) degree or BBA degree, or instructor’s permission
An overview of the development of international air transportation systems and the contexts within which they operate. The course will examine key national and international regulatory and industry bodies, reasons for their development, current roles, and emerging air transportation trends. In addition to regulatory issues, students will be introduced to the major political, social, cultural, economic, and technological forces affecting international air transportation.
BUS 370 3 credits
Managerial Control
Prerequisite(s): Bus 201 or Bus 203
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 201 or Bus 203
This course is a study of the non profit/public sector with specific attention to the measures that act as substitutes for profit as indicators of achievement. Topics include: control functions, key indicators, outcome measures, costing, budgeting, best practices, accountability, service, strategic planning, managerial behaviour and reporting and evaluating.
BUS 390 3 credits
Special Topics
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a Business Administration program; other prerequisites dependent on topic
This course investigates a special topic related to the management of businesses or other organizations. Normally this will consist of an in-depth consideration of an issue or problem faced by a specific type of organization or by organizations in general. This course will be offered only when funding is available and student interest is evident.
BUS 400 3 credits
Business and Society
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or BBA Aviation degree
This course examines the moral and ethical issues facing contemporary business. Perspectives on ethics and justice are explored and used to assess moral and ethical obligations of stakeholders such as employees, the public, government, owners, and managers, in a wide range of situations faced by organizations. Such situations may include, among others, corporate social responsibility, employee and shareholder rights, environmental obligations, and fair business practices.
BUS 403 3 credits
Strategic Management
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into fourth year of BBA degree or BBA Aviation degree
This course focuses on strategy formulation and strategic planning using an integrative approach which covers the major functional areas of management. Implementation issues will be discussed. This course should only be taken in the final semester of the degree program.
BUS 404 3 credits
Management Science
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree or Bachelor of Business Administration Aviation and Bus 301
This course covers the application of basic mathematical and statistical techniques to aid managerial decision making, to help solve a wide variety of problems from a broad range of areas in the business environment. This is a practical course, and extensive use of spreadsheets will be made.
BUS 407 3 credits
Gender and Diversity Issues
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 304
This course examines the ways in which gender, personal characteristics, and organizational structure interact in determining individuals’ experiences in organizations. Among the topics discussed will be how and why individual experiences differ, how different individuals behave in managerial positions, differences in labour market experiences, and the effects of organizational and societal socialization.
Note: Credit will not be given to students who previously completed Bus 307A.
BUS 408 3 credits
Teamwork in Organizations
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration, Bus 203
Pre- or corequisite(s): Bus 304
The ability to work effectively in groups is an important skill in the modern organization. This course will introduce students to theoretical concepts in group development and performance, and also explore practical applications of teamwork in existing organizations in the class itself. Credit will not be given to students who previously completed Bus 307B.
BUS 410 3 credits
Government and Enterprise
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree
This course will emphasize the nature of government-enterprise interaction in Canada and North America with special attention paid to competition policy, public regulation, public enterprise, and international trade agreements. Both theoretical and practical applications of the following topics will be examined: industrial strategy, macro-economic planning, energy and natural resource policies.
BUS 415 3 credits
Venture Initiation
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, and Bus 227
An examination of the key factors affecting venture initiation including completion of a venture opportunity analysis, market research, approaches to and location of funding, tax planning, cash-flow projections, and the mechanics of startup.
BUS 420 3 credits
International Business
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, or BBA (Aviation) degree
This course begins the study of the international business environment with a survey of cultural, social, and economic factors influencing decision making. Major functions of international commerce are reviewed including export and import trade, investment transfers, international production and marketing operations and global monetary control systems. A major emphasis of this course will be how business may gain from Asian-Pacific trade in the 21st century.
BUS 421 3 credits
International Marketing
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Business Administration degree program; Bus 320
This course examines the issues related to the marketing of products and services in the international context. Emphasis will be placed upon the development and implementation of policy, and strategy for a firm’s resources to meet the international marketing objectives. The international marketing issues related to a country or a geographic location will also be examined.
BUS 423 3 credits
Services Marketing
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree; Bus 320
This course is designed for those students who may be interested in service industries, and will address the distinct needs and problems of service organizations in the area of marketing. The theme of the course is that service organizations require a distinct approach to marketing strategy — both in development and execution. Hence, the course will build and expand on theories and concepts from core marketing courses to make them specifically applicable in service industry settings.
BUS 425 3 credits
Marketing Strategy
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 320, Bus 323 or Bus 421
This is a capstone course in marketing that integrates all areas of marketing by strategically examining market analysis, products and service, promotion pricing, distribution, and governmental regulation of marketing processes.
BUS 430 3 credits
Management of Innovation
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into fourth year of BBA degree or BBA (Aviation) degree
This course explores the process of innovation in industries such as telecommunications, high technology, pharmaceuticals, and manufacturing. The specific focus is on the management of R&D and the strategic role of innovations in any firm. This course should only be taken in the final semester of the degree program.
BUS 433 3 credits
Investments
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 301 and Bus 349
This course is designed to develop the student’s ability to value securities. Various methods of investment analysis will be studied. Stocks, bonds, and derivative products are used in a case setting to enable students to learn the appropriateness of using these tools and methods. All of these financial instruments are viewed from an individual, institutional, and portfolio perspective.
BUS 434 3 credits
Risk Management and Financial Engineering
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the Bachelor of Business Administration degree, and Bus 349
This course deals with ways in which the risks are quantified and managed in a portfolio that includes derivatives. Topics include a review of the Black-Scholes model of option pricing, and extending this theory to institutional hedging. Also examined is value at risk, credit risk, and empirical issues in risk management such as estimating volatilities and correlations.
BUS 435 3 credits
International Finance
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, and Bus 349
This course is a study of international financial markets and institutions, and introduces the student to the management of assets and liabilities in an international and multinational setting. Topics to be covered include: exchange rate determination, foreign exchange risk, interest rate swaps, international portfolio management, comparative markets, and country risks.
BUS 439 3 credits
Advanced Financial Accounting
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, or Accounting Certificate program, Bus 344
This course examines advanced financial accounting issues, including: long-term investments, business combinations and consolidations, intercorporate investments, foreign currency translation and transactions, and accounting for the not-for-profit sector.
BUS 440 3 credits
Management Information Systems
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, or CIS degree
The role of management information systems and its conceptual foundation in modern organizations; the technology of information systems; the system lifecycle of MIS, and the control and audit of an information system. Introduction to various types of MIS software with an emphasis on hands-on application.
BUS 449 3 credits
Financial Management II
Prerequisite(s): Bus 349
This course looks at various models of asset pricing. These models are then used to price securities such as stocks, bonds, and options, and the empirical implications of these theories are examined. Other topics include capital budgeting under uncertainty, optimal capital structure, dividend policy, mergers and acquisitions, and foreign exchange risk.
BUS 450 3 credits
Probabilistic Models in Operations Analysis
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 301
Corequisite(s): One of Math 111 or 115
The objective of this course is to enable students to “think probabilistically” in solving business-related problems. The modelling and analysis of uncertain systems in operations management is emphasized. Markov processes, renewal theory, reliability theory, and queuing analysis are introduced. The applications include production and inventory control, machine maintenance, customer waiting line, and other problems in both manufacturing and service industries.
BUS 451 3 credits
Computer Simulation Models in Business
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 350, Bus 301
This course is designed to develop the student’s ability to use the computer to simulate various production and operation systems in the real world. The topics include simulating empirical and theoretical probability distribution, selecting input probability distributions, verification and validation of simulation models, variance-reduction techniques, and statistical output analysis. Students are expected to develop computer simulation programs using PC or mainframe.
BUS 452 3 credits
Computer Applications in Operations
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance in Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 350
This course explains how computers are used in modern manufacturing and service organizations. Students will be introduced to the concept of CIM (Computer Integrated Manufacturing), and the automation of design and manufacturing (CAD, CAM), robotics and FMS, assembly line management, and computerized systems to develop planning and control strategies such as Materials Requirements Planning and Just-In-Time production.
BUS 453 3 credits
Decision Theory in Business
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 301, and one of Math 111 or 115
The goal of this course is to understand, model, and improve business decision-making under uncertainty and complexity. Tools include expected utility theory, Bayesian principles, and multiple attribute analysis. Students will develop computerized decision-support systems for decision makers (managers).
BUS 460 3 credits
Aviation Management
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to BBA (Aviation) degree or Bachelor of Business Administration degree, Bus 360 Econ 100, (Bus 100 or Bus 102)
An examination of current operational, management, and marketing issues faced by the airline industry. Topics will include issues related to Airline planning, forecasting, scheduling, fleet planning, and financing. The course will also examine the application of marketing concepts to the airline industry focusing on product planning, pricing, distribution and promotion.
BUS 492 3 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Bachelor of Business Administration degree
Independent reading and research on topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor, and approved by the program head. See program chair for details.
Chemistry
Unless stated otherwise, the minimum grade acceptable in all course prerequisites is a C-. In all cases, students will need the instructor’s written permission for waiver of a prerequisite.
Prerequisites must normally have been completed within the last five years; however, when circumstances warrant, the department head may waive this requirement.
Note: Students without high school Chemistry 12 can take Introductory Chemistry 110 as a prerequisite for Chemistry 113. If you are not adequately prepared for Chemistry 110 you should consider the Preparatory College Chemistry 083 described here.
CHEM 071 2 credits
Physical Science (Grade 10)
Prerequisite(s): Individual CCP assessment
This half-semester course consists of science and technology in the areas of introductory chemistry and physics. Laboratory exercises are included.
CHEM 083 4 credits
Preparatory College Chemistry
(Chemistry 11)
Prerequisite(s): Sci 071 or Science 10
Chem 083 is an introduction to chemistry for students who wish to prepare for entry into first-year courses in sciences, health sciences, or technology. Atomic structure, stoichiometry, and chemical properties of the elements are emphasized. Laboratory work is closely related to material covered in lectures.
CHEM 093 4 credits
Preparatory College Chemistry II
(Chemistry 12)
Prerequisite(s): Chem 083 or Chemistry 11
This course contains material similar to that covered in Chemistry 12, and involves inter-related theory and laboratory work. Topics covered are electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium and acid-base behaviour.
CHEM 105 4 credits
Introductory Chemistry for the Health and Environmental Sciences
Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 11 or Chem 083
Chem 105 is intended for students who require a lab science course to fulfill the requirements for other UCFV programs. It is an introductory lab course for students with a high school science background, and relates important scientific principles to the chemistry of the environment and the body. Chem 105 will satisfy part of the science requirements for a BA degree, but the course may not be used for credit by science or engineering majors. Chem 105 provides important background material for students intending to enter a variety of health sciences programs, and other programs requiring general chemistry. The course will provide students with information on the origins, scientific background, and significance of many aspects of chemistry that are met in the workplace and in everyday life.
Note: Chem 105 is not open for students with Chem 110 or above.
CHEM 110 4 credits
Introductory Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 11 or Chem 083; and Principles of Math 11, or Math 084/085, or equivalent
This course covers the principles of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, redox processes, electrochemistry, and chemistry of solutions, including solubility and acid-base equilibria. It can be used as a prerequisite to Chem 113 for those missing secondary school Chemistry 12 and wishing to enrol in Chem 113/114.
CHEM 113 5 credits
Principles of Chemistry I
Prerequisite(s): One of Chemistry 12, or Chem 093, or Chem 110, plus Principles of Math 12 or equivalent
An introduction to principles of chemistry with emphasis on the theory of atomic and molecular structures and bonding. Work performed in the laboratory complements lecture material. Along with Chemistry 114 (formerly Chemistry 112), this course will satisfy requirements for students wishing to pursue an honours or majors program in science.
CHEM 114 5 credits
Principles of Chemistry II
Prerequisite(s): Chem 111 or Chem 113
This course is an introduction to principles of chemistry thermodynamics with application to aqueous equilibria and electrochemistry, fundamentals of structure and nomenclature of organic compounds, and their isomerism and reactivity. Work performed in the laboratory complements lecture material. With Chemistry 113 (formerly Chemistry 111), this course will satisfy requirements for students wishing to pursue an honours or majors program in science.
Note: For students entering in the 2007/08 academic year or later, Chemistry 12 and Principles of Math 12 must be provincially examined.
CHEM 150 4 credits
Introductory Forensic Science
Prerequisite(s): Any one of Biology 11, Chemistry 11, Physics 11, Earth Science 11, or Computer Studies 11
Chem 150 is intended for students who are either (a) enrolled in the UCFV Criminal Justice diploma program, or (b) enrolled in the UCFV Bachelor of Arts (Criminal Justice) degree program, or (c) require a lab science course to fulfil the requirements for other UCFV programs. It is an introductory lab course for students with little science background, and covers chemical, physical, and biological aspects of forensic science. Chem 150 will satisfy the lab science requirement for UCFV’s BA degree.
Warning: Some of the course material may be of a disturbing nature.
Note: Chem 150 cannot be used to meet the requirements for the Chemistry major or minor programs. Chem 150 is not open to students with Chem 101 or above.
CHEM 213 4 credits
Organic Chemistry I
Prerequisite(s): One of Chem 101 (with B or better), or Chem 111, or Chem113; and one of Chem 102 (with B or better), Chem 112, or Chem 114
An introduction to the subject of organic chemistry through a study of the characteristic reactions of the common functional groups. Study of the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes is continued from first year. Alkyl halides, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, carbohydrates and ethers are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the study of reaction mechanisms, and the importance of stereochemistry is stressed throughout the course. The laboratory component of the course complements the lecture material and gives students experience in using some of the basic techniques that are employed in modern chemistry laboratories. This course is required for students pursuing careers in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, home economics, forestry, pre-medicine and pharmaceutical science.
CHEM 214 4 credits
Organic Chemistry II
Prerequisite(s): Chem 213
Organic Chemistry II continues the systematic examination of the reactions of common functional groups that were featured in Chem 213. Aromatic compounds including phenols, carbonyl condensation reactions, carboxylic acids, and their derivatives are studied. Biological topics include amino acids, peptides, proteins, phospholipids, terpenes, steroids, nucleic acids and the Krebs Cycle. Spectroscopy is studied and the importance of spectroscopic techniques in the analysis of organic compounds is emphasized. These techniques will be used in the laboratory component of the course. With Chem 213, this course satisfies organic chemistry requirements for students pursuing careers in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, home economics, forestry, pre-medicine, and pharmaceutical science.
CHEM 221 4 credits
Inorganic Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): Chem 113 or Chem 114
This course concentrates on the chemistry of non-transition elements and their compounds, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, periodic properties and the descriptive chemistry of selected groups. The experiments performed in the laboratory component of the course will be directly related to the topics discussed during lectures.
CHEM 224 4 credits
Atoms, Molecules, Spectra
Prerequisite(s): One of Chem 113, or Chem 111, or Chem 101 (with B or better); and one of Chem 114, or Chem 112, or Chem 102 (with B or better); plus either Phys 111/112 or Phys 105, and Math 111/112. (Math 211 is recommended)
Note: After April 2005, Chem 101, 102, 111, 112 will no longer meet prerequisites for this course.
An introduction to quantum mechanics and its applications to chemistry and spectroscopy. This course covers basic concepts of quantum mechanics and its applications to atomic and molecular systems. A computer lab illustrates lecture material.
CHEM 241 4 credits
Analytical Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): One of Chem 113, or Chem 112, or Chem 101 (with B or better); and one of Chem 114, or Chem 112, or Chem 102 (with B or better)
Note: After April 2005, Chem 101, 102, 111, 112 will no longer meet prerequisites for this course
An introduction to analytical chemistry with an emphasis on analysis of solutions. Lecture material includes data and sample handling, principles of titrimetry and electrochemical methods, as well as an introduction to chromatography. Laboratory experiments illustrate lecture material.
CHEM 311 4 credits
Intermediate Organic Chemistry I
Prerequisite(s): One of Chem 211 or Chem 213, and one of Chem 212 or Chem 214.
An intermediate-level organic chemistry course involving a detailed study of condensation reactions, dienes, and heterocyclic compounds. The spectroscopic techniques first introduced in Chem 212 are examined in more detail, both in theory and in practice. The laboratory component of the course involves the synthesis of a variety of compounds and qualitative analysis by both spectroscopic and chemical methods.
CHEM 312 4 credits
Intermediate Organic Chemistry II
Prerequisite(s): One of Chem 211 or Chem 213, and one of Chem 212 or Chem 214
The topics covered in Chem 312 include an introduction to the chemical literature, the investigation of reaction mechanisms, industrial organic chemistry, photochemistry, and the chemistry of selected compounds of biological interest, e.g., steroids. Laboratory work will illustrate a selection of the topics covered during lectures and may involve a short research project.
CHEM 321 4 credits
Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 221 or equivalent
This course concentrates on the coordination chemistry of the transition metals. Topics covered include isomerism, group theory, molecular orbital theory, uv-visible spectroscopy, and the kinetics and mechanisms of ligand substitution and redox reactions.
CHEM 324 4 credits
Chemical Kinetics and Thermodynamics
Prerequisite(s): One of Chem 113, or Chem 111, or Chem 101 (with B or better); and one of Chem 114, or Chem 112, or Chem 102 (with B or better); plus either Phys111/112 or Phys 105, and Math 111/112. (Math 211 is recommended.)
Note: After April 2005 Chem 101, 102, 111, 112 will no longer meet prerequisites for this course
An introduction to thermodynamics with applications to phase and chemical equilibria. Topics include principles of chemical kinetics, including enzyme kinetics and reaction rate theory. Laboratory experiments illustrate lecture material.
CHEM 341 4 credits
Instrumental Analysis/Applied Spectroscopy
Prerequisite(s): Chem 211 or Chem 213;and Chem 241
An introduction to instrumental analysis with the emphasis on spectroscopic methods. Lecture material covers principles of chromatography and applied spectroscopy. Laboratory experiments illustrate lecture material.
CHEM 408 3 credits
Directed Studies in Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): At least six upper-level chemistry credits and permission of the department head
This course is designed for students pursuing a major or minor in chemistry and represents a directed reading or literature research in an advanced topic of chemistry chosen in consultation with a supervisor. Normally this course will be taken during the fourth year of study.
CHEM 409 6 credits
Undergraduate Research in Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): At least six upper-level chemistry credits and permission of the department
The course is designed for students pursuing a major in Chemistry and represents a project in chemistry designed in consultation with a supervisor. Normally this course will be taken during the fourth year of study. It can be completed either in one or two consecutive semesters.
CHEM 412 4 credits
Topics in Organic Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): Chem 311 or Chem 312
In Chemistry 412 students will study a variety of topics that are of current interest to organic chemists. Whenever possible, these topics will be related to one another and to topics which have been introduced in other organic chemistry courses. Details of topics to be covered in a given semester will be posted on the Chemistry department website approximately one year before the course is offered.
CHEM 421 4 credits
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): Chem 321 or the equivalent
This course concentrates on organo-transition metal chemistry, with emphasis on bonding theories, the 18-electron rule and cluster compounds. Emphasis is also placed on the role of organometallic complexes in organic syntheses. The experiments performed in the laboratory component of the course will be directly related to the topics discussed during lectures.
CHEM 422 4 credits
Conformations of Molecules and Introduction to Computer-aided Drug Design
Prerequisite(s): Chem 211 or Chem 213, Chem 224, Math 111/112, and one of Phys 105 or Phys 111
This course covers modern computational techniques currently used in the conformational analysis of organic and biological molecules and includes an introduction to computer-aided drug design. Lectures are supplemented by computer-laboratory sessions during which students obtain practical experience in applying the techniques that have been discussed.
CHEM 451 3 credits
Bio-inorganic Chemistry
Prerequisite(s): Chem 221 and Chem 321
Bio-inorganic chemistry is a rapidly expanding area and provides an important bridge between chemistry and biology. Students will study a variety of biological systems involving both main-group and transition metals.
CHEM 455 3 credits
Chemistry of Biological and Synthetic Polymers
Prerequisite(s): One of Chem 211 or Chem 213, and one of Chem 212 or Chem 214
The course concentrates on (a) the chemistry of synthetic organic, inorganic and biomedical polymers, with emphasis on polymerization reactions; the characterization, structure and properties of polymers; and their role in industrial processes and (b) the chemistry of naturally occurring organic and inorganic polymers, with emphasis on the extraction and purification, characterization, structure, and properties of proteins, nucleic acids, polysaccharides, cellulose, chitin, rubber and lignin, and their role in biological processes.
Child and Youth Care
Note: For Transferability of CYC courses, see the Child and Youth Care Education Consortium of B.C.’s website at www.cycec.bc.ca for transfer agreements.
CYC 201 3 credits
Introduction to Professional Child and Youth Care
Prerequisite(s): Departmentally approved certificate or diploma or 30 university-transfer credits or permission of the program head
This course presents an overview of the child and youth care field. It is a required course for program students, however it is also available for non-program students. Content includes a survey of the history of the profession and the role of the child and youth care practitioner across a broad spectrum of settings.
CYC 210 3 credits
Professional Practice Issues in Child and Youth Care
(formerly CYC 200B)
Prerequisite(s): Departmentally approved related certificate or diploma or 30 university-transfer credits or permission of the program head.
This course explores child and youth care professional practice issues within the context of ethics, professional identity, and interdisciplinary approach. Skills for written and verbal communication are advanced throughout the course as well as workplace standards for documentation. The course will look at legislation governing child and youth care practice.
CYC 220 3 credits
Theoretical Foundations for Child and Youth Care
(formerly CYC 200A)
Prerequisite(s): Departmentally approved related certificate or diploma or 30 university-transfer credits or permission of the program head
This course introduces theories of behaviour change, a systems orientation to personal and organizational change, and a normative developmental approach as a basis for developing a personal/professional theoretical perspective for child and youth care practice.
CYC 260 3 credits
Special Topics in Child and Youth Care
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program or permission of the program head
This course provides an opportunity to examine selected current issues in child and youth care. With approval of the program head, this course may be taken more than once for credit.
CYC 267 3 credits
Introduction to Working with Individuals in Child and Youth Care
(formerly CYC 252A)
Prerequisite(s): Departmentally approved related certificate or diploma or 30 university-transfer credits or permission of the program head
This course focuses on facilitating purposeful change in the lives of children and youth. Self-awareness and the importance and use of therapeutic relationships are explored in the context of helping process model and core communication skills. Change theory, risk assessment, and crisis intervention are introduced as they relate to child and youth care practice.
CYC 268 3 credits
Introduction to Working with Groups and Families in Child and Youth Care
(formerly CYC 252B)
Prerequisite(s): Departmentally approved related certificate or diploma or 30 university-transfer credits or permission of the program head
This course focuses on using core communication skills and helping strategies to work in groups and connect with families. Group and family dynamics will be explored in the context of child and youth care practice. The prevention of abuse and neglect and cycles of family and community violence will be examined. Contemporary models of community service to children, youth, and families will be explored.
CYC 310 9 credits
Supervised Practicum
Offered as CYC 310A/310B
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC Program, all 200-level courses need to be completed.
Pre- or corequisite(s): CYC 320, CYC 321, CYC 340, CYC 341
Note: The course is offered over two semesters and CYC 320 and CYC 321 would be taken at the same time as the CYC 310A and CYC 340 and CYC 341 would be taken at the same time as the CYC 310B.
This course requires students to work directly with children/youth in a supervised practice situation in order to promote professional skill acquisition and integration. Emphasis is placed on observation and recording skills, understanding the structure and functioning of a service agency, and fostering an awareness of professional functioning in relation to children, youth, and agency workers. Attention will also be given to development of beginning-level case planning, intervention, and case presentation skills with both one-to-one and group focus.
CYC 310 is a full-year course. CYC 310A is normally offered Sept-Dec, and CYC 310B follows. CYC 310B must be taken in the same academic year as CYC 310A. Students must take both to receive credit.
CYC 320 3 credits
Administration in CYC Practice
(formerly CYC 301A)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program and successful completion of all CYC 200-level core courses
This course integrates theory and practice in the application of child and youth care by focusing on assessment, case planning, and intervention using major therapeutic approaches and their associated models for case management.
CYC 321 3 credits
Critical Issues in Current CYC Practice
(formerly CYC 301B)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program and successful completion of all CYC 200-level core courses
This course examines issues that are pertinent and critical in the lives of children and youth. Students will analyze areas of practice, and demonstrate competence in real or simulated examples using professional knowledge, skills, values, and styles.
CYC 340 3 credits
Developmental Theory in CYC Practice
(formerly CYC 338A)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program, successful completion of all CYC 200-level core courses, and one developmental psychology course
This course focuses on the understanding of developmental theory. The content examines the history of eight contemporary theories and relevant implications in practice with children, youth, and their families. The context of the ecological model is used as a unifying construct for considering all work with children, youth, and families with this course material.
CYC 341 3 credits
Applying Developmental Theory to CYC Practice
(formerly CYC 338B)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program, CYC 340 (formerly CYC 338A)
This course focuses on the clinical application of contemporary developmental theory. The content examines the application of eight contemporary theories to the various community agencies, and issues relevant to the field of practice with children, youth, and their families. The course emphasizes program design and professional practice for all work with children, youth, and families.
CYC 350 3 credits
Law and Social Services
(formerly CYC 350A)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW or CYC degree program
This course utilizes a critical analysis to introduce students to law and related social policies relevant to child and youth care and social work practitioners. Students will examine law as an expression of social policy in areas such as child welfare, domestic violence, mental health, family law, young offenders, social assistance, and human rights, particularly as they affect vulnerable and marginalized populations. The course will address statutory frameworks, with an emphasis on the role of law, the structure of courts, professional codes of ethics, and legal accountability and liability.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of SSSW 312, CYC 350A, and CYC 350.
CYC 351 3 credits
Legal Skills for Social Service Professionals
(formerly CYC 350B)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BSW or CYC degree program, and SOWK 312 or CYC 350 (formerly CYC 350A)
This is a skills-based course focusing on both the development and the demonstration of skills that are part of statutory social service functions in child welfare, probation and youth work, parole, family court counselling and mental health. Students will learn and demonstrate skills related to the various mandates that govern their work as professionals in the social services. The course will involve experiential learning related to dispute resolution, advocacy, and legal skills such as investigation, evidence giving, and report writing. Fundamental to practicing these skills is an understanding of empowerment, partnership, working across differences, and individual and systemic change. The course will utilize a critical perspective and promote an understanding of the strengths and limitations of these skills in social service fields.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both SOWK 412 and CYC 351.
CYC 360 3 credits
Special Topics in Child and Youth Care
Developed in partnership with the University of Victoria
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program or permission of the program head
This course provides an opportunity to examine selected current issues in child and youth care. With approval of the program head, this course may be taken more than once for credit.
CYC 390 6 credits
Directed Studies in Child and Youth Care
Developed in partnership with the University of Victoria
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program or permission of the program head
Research projects, directed readings, or additional course work in a specified area. May be taken more than once for credit, provided the course content is different from that previously taken.
CYC 394 3 credits
Introduction to Substance Abuse
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from a Human Service program or Arts and Sciences, including Psyc 101, or instructor’s permission
This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of the nature and extent of both chemical dependencies and addictive behaviours. Students will explore various theoretical perspectives on the nature of addictions. Topics include an overview of commonly abused substances, the use/misuse/abuse continuum, the social costs of addiction, specific drugs, social issues around addiction, and prevention and treatment of addictions. There will be an emphasis on issues related to gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and age. The particular focus on social work/social services in the continuum of care will be examined.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CYC 394 and SSSW 394.
CYC 410 9 credits
Advanced Practice in CYC
Offered as CYC 410A/410B
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program and successful completion of all 300-level CYC core courses
Pre- or corequisite(s): CYC 423, CYC 425, CYC 467, CYC 468, CYC 469
Note: CYC 469 is not a co- or prerequisite for CYC 410A, but it is for CYC 410B
This supervised practicum focuses on application of learning. If possible, students are placed in their chosen professional area of interest. This course provides an opportunity to apply case-planning, intervention, and evaluation skills at an advanced level. Professional consultation, clinical functioning, and the integration of theory and practice are emphasized. Ten hours per week in the practicum setting and one hour per week in a seminar are required.
Note: CYC 469 is not a co- or prerequisite for CYC 410A, but it is for CYC 410B *Advanced Practicum in CYC is a full-year course. CYC 410A is normally offered Sept-Dec, and CYC 410B follows. CYC 410B must be taken in the same academic year as CYC 410A. Students must take both to receive credit.
CYC 423 3 credits
Research Methods in Child and Youth Care
Developed in partnership with the University of Victoria
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program or permission of instructor
This course introduces students to ways in which research in the child and youth care field is conducted. Within an applied research context, students will investigate the knowledge and skills necessary to locate, understand, and utilize research relating to the field of CYC. Students will examine and apply basic issues, designs, and methodologies within qualitative and quantitative research models.
CYC 425 3 credits
Data Analysis in Child and Youth Care
Developed in partnership with the University of Victoria
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program or permission of instructor.
This course introduces students to data analysis in the child and youth care field, including both theoretical and practical perspectives. The first half of the course is spent considering a variety of quantitative techniques. The remainder of the course explores qualitative analysis and its guiding principles.
CYC 467 3 credits
Advanced Skills with Individuals in Child and Youth Care
(formerly CYC 474)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to CYC degree program and successful completion of 300-level CYC core courses
This course focuses on the development of skills in working with individual children and youth. You will apply behavioural change theories in a laboratory environment and receive feedback on your application of interventions in child and youth care practice.
CYC 468 3 credits
Advanced Skills with Groups in Child and Youth Care
(formerly CYC 465)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program and successful completion of all 300-level CYC core courses
Theoretical approaches and techniques related to the planning and management of groups is presented. Content focuses on developing plans to organize and conduct groups for children, youth and families. You will apply theory through leading group interventions and will receive feedback on you work in a laboratory-style environment.
CYC 469 3 credits
Advanced Skills with Families in Child and Youth Care
(formerly CYC 466)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to CYC degree program and successful completion of CYC 320, CYC 310A/B, and CYC 340 (formerly CYC 301, CYC 310, and CYC 338)
This course presents conceptual frameworks and models for understanding family functioning and parenting. The child and youth care service settings in which family work occurs are identified; family assessment methodologies and interventions that are appropriate to child and youth care workers in these settings are presented.
CYC 475 3 credits
Discussion and Counselling Groups with Children and Youth
Developed in partnership with the University of Victoria
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program and successful completion of CYC 465
This course focuses on developing the knowledge and skills required for the organizing and managing of groups with children and youth. You will apply theory through group interventions and will receive feedback on your work in a laboratory environment. You will also lead a group of children or youth during the course.
CYC 476 3 credits
Child and Youth Care Practice with Families
Developed in partnership with the University of Victoria
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program and successful completion of CYC 466
This course focuses on the development of skills related to children and youth care practice with families. You will apply theory through interventions for children, parents and their families based on the assessed needs and identified goals. You will also work in a laboratory environment and receive feedback on your approaches and style in working with families.
CYC 490 6 credits
Directed Studies in Child and Youth Care
Developed in partnership with the University of Victoria
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the CYC degree program or permission of the program head
Research projects, directed readings, or additional course work in a specified area. May be taken more than once for credit, provided the course content is different from that previously taken.
CYC 496 3 credits
Special Topics: Disability Issues
Prerequisite(s): None
This course involves students in an examination of perspectives on disability, as well as critical analysis of current theories, policies, and practice. The course begins with an examination of common assumptions about disability and provides opportunities to challenge and critique interpretations of the nature and meaning of disability. Several frameworks are proposed for approaching disability issues, with emphasis given to a social justice framework which emphasizes the citizenship and human rights of people with disabilities. The history of attitudes about, and treatment of , people with disabilities is examined. Significant events and the contributions of pioneers of the disability rights movement are also highlighted. The roles and perspectives of people with disabilities, family members, and professionals in service systems are examined in the context of a range of topics.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CYC 496 and SOWK 496.
College Achievement Program
CAP 110 3 credits
Writing and Research Skills
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides a step-by-step process for writing research papers. The course deals with instructors’ expectations for academic performance. A multicultural curriculum is used.
CAP 120 3 credits
Potential Development Training
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides personal and career exploration. A multicultural curriculum is used.
CAP 130 3 credits
Reading and Study
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides academic support skills and techniques for the other courses that students are/will be taking. Topics include time and stress management, rapid reading, and study hints. A multicultural curriculum is used.
CAP 140 3 credits
Career Planning
Prerequisite(s): None
This 60-hour three-credit course provides opportunities for the development of communication, leadership, teamwork, and computer skills. Thirty of the 60 hours are spent in a supervised practicum with a business or community agency of the student’s choice. Participants also learn the latest strategies in job hunting and career planning.
College and Career Preparation
CCP LC 0 credits
College and Career Preparation Learning Centre
Prerequisite(s): None
Learning Centres focus on upgrading designed to provide students with entry-level requirements for specfic UCFV vocational, applied, and academic programs.
CCP LC2B 0 credits
College and Career Preparation Learning Centre (Extended length)
Prerequisite(s): None
A Learning Centre that provides about twice as much contact as usual.
Communications
Placement Test Scores
Students registering for CMNS 115, 125, 145, 155, and 165 are required to have a Composition Placement Test score of 48 or better, or to present the appropriate alternative for satisfying the prerequisite. Students who have not written the CPT should contact Assessment Services for information about when the tests are scheduled. Students who are unable to provide proof of an appropriate prerequisite, or are unable to provide a CPT score of 48 or better, will be withdrawn from the course by the department faculty.
Assignments
As presentation is an important element of professional communications, several courses require all or a number of assignments to be typed or word processed.
Prerequisites
For equivalencies of the prerequisites listed below, contact the department head.
Note: Students who do not have a prerequisite for first year Communications courses should take CMNS 099. CMNS 099 with a grade of C or better is a prerequisite for English 105, or any first-year Communications course.
CMNS 099 3 credits
Introduction to Written Communications
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 41 or higher, or a grade of B or better in English 12, Literature 12, or TPC 12. Recommended that ESL students also have ESL WG84, ESL S76, ESL L87, ESL R80, or equivalent levels
This course focuses on developing reading and listening skills and academic and professional writing skills to prepare students for the writing requirements of academic courses. Areas covered include grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, the writing process, thesis and paragraph development, summaries, and essays.
Note: Students who do not have a prerequisite for first-year communications courses should take CMNS 099.
This course can be adapted to meet the education needs of specific learners (e.g., First Nations students, international education students, military personnel). The First Nations version provides an introduction to concepts in selected academic disciplines and First Nations literature. The international education version focuses on business applications, grammar, sentence structure, and word use. The military personnel version focuses on grammar and provides an overview of descriptive, narrative, and argumentative composition.
CMNS 115 3 credits
Technical Communications for Trades
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Trades programs
Communications 115 is an introduction to the general principles and techniques of effective communications in the work place. The course examines the barriers to effective communications and how these barriers can be reduced. Common written and oral communications on the job (including customer and co-worker relations) are the focus of course assignments. Employment applications (forms, letters of applications, and resumes) and interview preparation and skills are a major practical area of the course.
CMNS 125 3 credits
Business Communications
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or CMNS 099 or Engl 099 with a C or better, or Engl 081 or 091 with C+ or better, or ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better, or a grade of A in English 12, Literature 12, or TPC 12
This course offers an introduction to the general principles of technical and professional communications. Emphasis is on the communication process, presentations, and descriptive, expository, and argumentative messages. Document design and electronic messages are also studied and practiced.
CMNS 145 3 credits
Technical Communications for Drafting
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or acceptance into Drafting program
This course provides an introduction to general principles of effective written and oral communication. The focus is on commonly used reports (e.g., progress, field, site investigation) and technical correspondence.
CMNS 155 3 credits
Communications for Human Services
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or CMNS 099 or Engl 099 with a C or better, or Engl 081 or 091 with C+ or better, or ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better, or a grade of A in English 12, Literature 12, or TPC 12
Corequisite(s): None
Introduction to theory and practice of academic and professional technical communications. Course topics include the communication principles of organization and structure, essay writing, narrative, exposition, and argument in workplace writing and presentations.
Note: Accepted for meeting the UCFV Bachelor of Arts writing requirement or as an elective in the BA program.
Note: Accepted for meeting the UCFV Bachelor of Arts literacy requirement or as an elective in the BA program.
CMNS 165 3 credits
Professional Communications for Kinesiology
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or higher, or CMNS 099 with C or better, or Engl 099 with a C or better, or Engl 081 or 091 with C+ or better, or a grade of A in English 12, Literature 12, or TPC 12, or grade of C+ or better in ESL WG 84
This course offers an introduction to the principles of effective communications in academic and professional settings. Examines the use of various media as well as the processes of oral and written communications. Students will be required to develop and demonstrate research, summary, and organizational skills in oral presentations, letters, memos, and short reports.
CMNS 212 3 credits
Applied Communication
(formerly MACS 212)
Prerequisite(s): C or better in CMNS 125, CMNS 155, CMNS 165, or Engl 105
This course assists students to develop practical strategies to communicate clearly to a variety of different audiences. Topics include the role and function of specialist languages in advertising, advocacy, and the media; social marketing; audience analysis; and desktop publishing.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CMNS 212 and MACS 212.
CMNS 235 3 credits
Oral Communications
Prerequisite(s): None
This course focuses on the principles and psychology of effective speaking. Specific areas include informal presentations to small groups, formal presentations, meetings, the use of audio visual aids, developing the voice and improving body language. Videotaped feedback is an important part of the course.
CMNS 250 3 credits
Report Writing for Business, Information Technologies, Social and Human Services
(Formerly CMNS 225 and CMNS 255.  This course can also can be offered as 250A/250B)
Prerequisite(s): C in CMNS 155, or CMNS 125, or English 105
Corequisite(s): Agriculture 244/245 for those taking CMNS 250 in the Agriculture Technology Diploma
This course introduces the skills of report writing in a business and/or social sciences context. Students will develop the skills and principles learned in CMNS 155 or CMNS 125. The main focus is the formal research report, including a research proposal, progress reports, and formal presentations. Secondary research skills, project planning, documentation and citations, and data collection and manipulation are practised.
Note: Accepted for meeting the UCFV Bachelor of Arts Reasoning Requirement or as as elective in the BA program.
CMNS 312 3 credits
Introduction to Public and Community Relations
Prerequisite(s): A first-year Communications course, or Engl 105, or CMNS/MACS 212 with a C or better.
This course provides an introduction to the principles and publications of public and community relations. Students will develop practical strategies to communicate to a variety of audiences. Students will work to produce a basic press kit (press release, backgrounder, brochure) for a specific event.
CMNS 325 3 credits
Writing for the Sciences and Technologies
Prerequisite(s): One of CMNS 125, CMNS 145, or Engl 105 with a C or better
An introduction to advanced principles and practical applications of written and oral communication for the Sciences. Emphasis is on professional, technical communications to a wide range of audiences, including popular newspapers and magazines, and scientific journals. Topics covered include the ethics of scientific communication, using computers in research and in the writing process, defining audiences, designing documents, using visual aids, and effective oral presentations.
CMNS 345 3 credits
Instructional Skills for Professionals
Prerequisite(s): (CMNS 125 and 250) or Engl 105 and one of 120 to 170) or (CMNS 155 and 250)
This course provides an opportunity to design and teach using a variety of media, to a variety of audiences, in a variety of situations. Developing lesson plans, using instructional technologies, developing and using evaluation techniques, and conducting on-the-job training are the focus of the course.
Note: Some public speaking skills are assumed in this course.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CMNS 345 and ADED 345.
CMNS 360 4 credits
Advocacy and Proposal Writing
Prerequisite(s): CMNS 155, or English 105, or CMNS 212 or MACS 212; and CMNS 2225 or CMNS 255
This course will teach students proposal and advocacy writing at an advanced level. Examples of proposals are research proposals, funding proposals, persuasive requests to municipal and regional goverments, service proposals and writing campaigns to advocate social change.
This course will teach students advanced and focused secondary research skills, especially with government documents. This course will address the writing skills connected to larger social and political issues.
Note: Accepted for meeting the UCFV Bachelor of Arts writing requirement or as an elective in the BA program.
CMNS 375 3 credits
Document Design, Desktop and Web Publishing
Prerequisite(s): C or better in one of CMNS 115, 125, 145, 155, 165, or one of English 105 — 170 with a C or better, familiarity with word-processing software and the Internet is essential for success in this course
This course focuses on the theory and practice of document design, typography, desktop and Web publishing. Students will apply their knowledge in design to a variety of documents including brochures, newsletters, web pages, online publications, etc.
CMNS 385 3 credits
Language and Action: A Survey of Contemporary Rhetoric
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits of university-transfer courses including a first-year Communications or English course
Students will investigate major schools of contemporary rhetorical theory in an effort to understand the paradigms governing language use in contemporary social and linguistic environments. Rhetoric always includes study of the ways language serves as a call to action; in this course, the emphasis will be on the ways language acts — in itself, on the user, and on the discourse community.
CMNS 412 3 credits
Community Relations and the Media
Prerequisite(s): CMNS 312
Advanced study of print, radio, TV, and electronic media techniques and applications in community and public relations. Considerations and effects of purpose, audience, the media, and the message are incorporated in a variety of practical assignments. A fundamental aspect of the course is incorporating language and design according to the requirements and limitations of the media, the message, and the audience. Print media assignments involve newsletters, brochures and flyers, press releases, press kits, print advertising, and articles. Radio and TV media assignments will consist of designed spots, while electronic media assignments will entail the design of a web page/site for an organization. Students will be paired with organizations and produce a number of assignments according to that organization’s directions and focus.
Computer Information Systems
Note: Transferability information is available online by viewing the B.C. transfer guide at www.bccat.bc.ca
Note: Additional computing courses are listed in the Computing Science section on page 261.
Many of the seats in these courses are reserved for students in a Computer Information Systems program. Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space.
CIS 100 3 credits
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
Prerequisite(s): None
Designed for students with limited or no experience in the use of microcomputer software applications. This course includes an overview of computer concepts. Electronic mail and the internet will be introduced. Emphasis is on a practical, step-by-step, hands-on approach to learning an operating system, word processing, electronic worksheets, database management, and visual and graphic software.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CIS 100 and Comp 100.
CIS 110 3 credits
Computerized Business Applications
Prerequisite(s): Familiarity with Windows is essential for success in this course. Students should consult the CIS web page at www.ufv.ca/cis/ for details. CIS 100 with a grade of C or better is recommended
Designed for students with a basic foundation in the use of microcomputer software applications. Students will accelerate directly into the use and integration of some of the more advanced features of applications such as word processing, electronic worksheets, database management, and visual and graphic software as well as electronic mail and the internet. Emphasis is on using computers to analyze and solve problems in a business environment.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CIS 110 and Bus 160.
CIS 115 3 credits
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
Prerequisite(s): None
This is a computer literacy course designed for students who are not enrolled in CIS programs. This course provides students with a broad understanding of the ideas and issues in computing and computer information systems. Concepts include hardware and software, representation of data, and program and system development issues. This course cannot be used for credit in CIS programs.
CIS 145 3 credits
Web Publishing
Pre- or corequisite(s): Familiarity with Windows is essential for success in this course. Students should consult the CIS webpage at www.ufv.ca/cis for details.
Students will design, organize, publish, and maintain a website, applying HTML, scripting, multimedia plug-ins, cascading style sheets and JavaScript programming. We will discuss the issues that affect operational aspects of an Internet site. This course is intended for students with no prior knowledge of HTML.
CIS 146 3 credits
Web Publishing — Intermediate
Prerequisite(s): CIS 145, or familiarity with basic web skills, or permission of instructor. Students should consult the CIS web page at www.ufv.ca/cis/ for details.
Pre- or corequisite(s): Comp 150
The objective of this course is to teach students with a working knowledge of HTML how to design, organize, and maintain an intermediate level website. Students will learn cascading style sheets and JavaScript programming at an intermediate level. Students will learn a general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited for Web development and can be embedded into HTML at an introductory level. This course is intended for students with a working knowledge of HTML and basic web skills such as those listed for CIS 145. Student without experience with HTML should take CIS 145.
Note: Students cannot obtain credit for both CIS 145 and 146 in CIS programs.
CIS 180 4 credits
Introduction to Visual Programming
Prerequisite(s): Comp 150 (with a grade of C+ or better)
This course will introduce students to the visually based Rapid Application Development (RAD) approach to software development. The concepts behind visual RAD tools will be examined, and the application of these tools in a variety of practical situations will be studied. Students will have the opportunity to develop their skill in using RAD tools in a substantial programming project.
CIS 190 4 credits
Systems Hardware Concepts
(formerly CIS 290)
Prerequisite(s): Familiarity with computers is essential for success; see CIS web page (www.ufv.ca/cis) for details
Corequisite(s): CIS 115 or Comp 125
This course will introduce students to the capabilities of various components to enable them to specify equipment needs, and describe and apply formal problem-solving techniques to the physical installation and maintenance of microcomputer hardware such as expansion devices, communications equipment (LAN, modem, printers), secondary storage and video displays.
CIS 192 4 credits
Introduction to Networking
(formerly CIS 191)
Prerequisite(s): CIS 190 and Comp 125
Pre- or corequisite(s): None
This course discusses networking fundamentals, including network elements, physical topologies and design, physical media, and common networking connectivity devices, networking components, and connectors. Included will be discussion on the OSI reference model and TCP/IP fundamentals. This course will also provide knowledge on internetworking, LAN/WAN protocols. Students will learn to set up peer-to-peer networks.
Note: Students may not use both CIS 191 and CIS 192 to meet CIS program requirements.
CIS 221 4 credits
Principals of Information Systems Security
Prerequisite(s): Comp 150, CIS 192
This course provides an introduction to proven techniques for protecting information systems from intruders, while allowing the required access to authorized users. This course is introductory and is designed to provide an overall view of security in the modern information world. Several hands-on lab projects will be completed using Linux- and/or Windows-based computer systems.
CIS 230 4 credits
Databases and Database Management Systems
(formerly Comp 330)
Prerequisite(s): CIS 180 or Comp 155
This course covers the theoretical foundations necessary to design and implement a database, and to use a database management system effectively. The database approach is introduced and major models are reviewed. Relational models are considered in more detail. Data modeling techniques are used as a tool for database design. Students will study data manipulation languages such as relational algebra and SQL. Normalization and practical design considerations are covered.
CIS 245 4 credits
Intermediate Web Programming
Prerequisite(s): CIS 145 and CIS 180
The objective of this course is to teach students how to program dynamic websites. Students will learn how to include programming into a working website on the world wide web using current web programming languages.
CIS 270 3 credits
Analysis and Design
Prerequisite(s): Comp 155
Pre- or corequisite(s): CMNS 125
An introduction to computer systems development process, covering aspects of project initiation, analysis, and design. Both classical and object-oriented techniques will be included.
CIS 280 4 credits
Client/Server Programming
Prerequisite(s): CIS 145, CIS 180 with C+ or better
Pre- or corequisite(s): CIS 230, CIS 270
This course examines the development of connectivity solution for client/server systems. Topics include servers versus clients, SQL-based database systems, transactions, middleware, and communication between clients and servers. A major team-based programming project will be developed and presented by the students at the end of term.
CIS 285 3 credits
End User Training & Support
(formerly CIS 360)
Prerequisite(s): Comp 125, CMNS 125
An overview of the training and support functions within Information Systems. Students will examine existing models and complete projects demonstrating their understanding of planning, developing, implementing and evaluating training and support systems.
CIS 291 4 credits
Networking Theory and Applications
Prerequisite(s): CIS 191 or 192
Students will become familiar with networking concepts including networking directory service, networking file systems, network printing and network management. Students will receive practical training on the installation and integration of network operating systems, on the use of single- and multi-user systems via networking, and on the use of a variety of peripherals.
CIS 292 4 credits
Wide Area Networking I
Prerequisite(s): CIS 192
This course is designed to teach students the skills they will need to design, build, and maintain local area networks and wide area networks. The focus of this course is to introduce the WAN protocols, software, and hardware technologies needed to build WANs. Students will also learn about virtual LANs, LAN switching, Fast Ethernets, Frame Relay, and ISDN networking. This course also covers how to configure routers to set up different types of LANs and WANs using LAN and WAN protocols.
CIS 296 4 credits
Network Operating Systems
Prerequisite(s): CIS 191 or CIS 192 or CIS 195 or CIS 295
This course will provide students with the necessary knowledge to plan, design, install, configure, and supervise LANs and WANs. This course also provides the practical experience needed to troubleshoot, manage, and maintain a local area network. Students will be exposed to different network operating systems to illustrate these ideas.
CIS 297 4 credits
Internet Investigation II
Prerequisite(s): RCMP Internet for Investigators (Basic) or permission of instructor
This course focuses on Internet and computer security issues and their relationship to secrecy and the interception of communications. In addition to an introduction to the “hacker” subculture, this course also covers some of the tools used by hackers to exploit computer systems vulnerabilities and destroy data. Criminal law studies related to information technology will be covered, as will an introduction to the computer forensic examination process.
CIS 298 4 credits
Internet Investigation III
Prerequisite(s): CIS 297, permission of the department
This course will provide students with an understanding of the Internet-based network architecture, and will introduce vocabulary and concepts that will assist students in understanding computer networks, particularly as they relate to police investigations and security breaches. General theory regarding the interception of internet and network-based communications will be covered, as will some techniques that may be employed for it. Issues that commonly surface during an investigation involving a Local Area Network (LAN) will be discussed. In addition to learning how to trace e-mail to its point of origin, students will be introduced to Linux and UNIX, the most common operating systems found on servers connected to the Internet.
CIS 321 4 credits
Fundamentals: Network Security
Prerequisite(s): CIS 292, or current CCNA certification and permission of instructor. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department.)
This course focuses on network security architectures, procedures and processes. Practical hands-on skill development is provided in security system technologies, security policy design, firewall design and implementation, router security architectures, authentication and authorization systems, Intrusion detection and VPNs. This course will include the “Cisco — Fundamentals of Network Security” learning objectives.
CIS 325 4 credits
Malicious Software and Attack Prevention
Prerequisite(s): CIS 221, acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department.)

This course will provide students with proven techniques for allowing authorized users access to the Internet while protecting the inner network from attack by someone who has circumvented the outer defence or from internal attack. Methods and technologies such as secure programming, viruses, host-based intrusion detection, auditing, threat modeling, forensics, software firewalls, and operating system hardening will be discussed.
CIS 341 3 credits
System Administration
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department.) CIS 291 is recommended
Pre- or corequisite(s): Comp 340 is required
The objective of this course is to teach students how to plan, install, configure, performance tune and administer a multi-user Unix/Linux-based system.
CIS 370 3 credits
Software Engineering
Prerequisite(s): CIS 270. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department.)
A detailed consideration of how systems are engineered using both classical and object-oriented techniques. It is a continuation of the analysis and design work started in CIS 270. Topics cover all aspects of the software life-cycle. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented techniques and the Unified Modeling Language (UML).
Note: Completing this course does not qualify you to hold the “PEng” designation.
CIS 371 3 credits
Object Oriented Modeling & Design
Prerequisite(s): CIS 270. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
Using an object-oriented approach, students of this course will study how to create requirements models and then use those models in the design and construction of good quality software. The unified modeling language (UML) will be used extensively throughout this course.
CIS 380 3 credits
Artificial Intelligence for Business Applications
Prerequisite(s): Comp 251, and Math 106 or Math 104 with a grade of B+ or better is required. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course will provide students with an introduction to the concepts of rule-based systems and the fundamentals necessary for the development of decision support systems.
CIS 385 3 credits
Project Management
Prerequisite(s): CIS 270 or CIS 291. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course covers the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to information systems project development activities in order to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations. The course is designed to complement existing information technology knowledge, skills, and experience with the project management skills requirement to effectively manage development projects that involve computer hardware, computer software, and telecommunications technology.
CIS 386 3 credits
Human Factors
Prerequisite(s): CIS 285. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
Human factors engineering or ergonomics concerns itself with the study of human capabilities and limitations and their relationship to things, processes and work environments. This course provides a broad overview of the field with an emphasis on human-computer interface development, user-centered design and usability evaluation. Students learn principles of work and system design that help to improve system performance and reliability.
CIS 390 3 credits
Data Communications
Prerequisite(s): CIS 291 or CIS 295, and Math 106 or Math 104 with a grade of B+ or better is required. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
Students will become familiar with the ideas, methods, and standards being used for the electronic exchange of data, as well as a discussion of interfaces. Included will be discussions on the OSI reference model, commonly used protocols, data communication equipment, network topologies (international, national, provincial, local), network design and tradeoffs, routing protocols, performance analysis and modeling, and network and data security. Students will consider case studies of different performance measures and management requirements, so that they can effectively analyze data communication alternatives for a business problem.
CIS 392 4 credits
Internetworking
Prerequisite(s): CIS 292 or CCNA certification. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course provides advanced Routed Internetwork knowledge. Students will learn how to install, configure and troubleshoot complex Internetworks as found in medium to large organisations. Topics include routing protocols such as BGP, OSPF, EIGRP, and RIP and advanced IP address management techniques in large scaleable networked environments. Other related topics include traffic management with access control lists, redundant default gateways and the related security issues when routing between multiple autonomous systems.
CIS 393 4 credits
Remote Access Internetworking
Prerequisite(s): CIS 292, or current CCNA certification and permission of instructor. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
In this course students will design, plan, implement, test and troubleshoot remote access network solutions. Topics include WANs, asynchronous dial-up access, cable and DSL broadband, PPP, ISDN BRI/PRI, Frame-Relay, traffic shaping, backup links, security policies, scaling IP address plans using NAT, and VPNs. This course will include the Cisco CCNP Semester 2 learning objectives.
CIS 394 4 credits
Multilayer Switching
Prerequisite(s): CIS 292, or current CCNA certification and permission of instructor. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
Advanced switched network principles as used in modern-day campus LANs are presented. Hands-on exercises will be used to develop skill in a variety of topic areas including VLANS, inter-VLAN routing, VTP,STP, multi-layer switching, redundant fault tolerance design and QoS. Campus LAN security and support for emerging LAN services including VOIP and streaming audio/video applications will be explored. This course will include the Cisco CCNP Semester 3 learning objectives.
CIS 430 3 credits
Advanced Database Topics
Prerequisite(s): CIS 230. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department.) Comp 340 is recommended
Students will study, discuss and compare current idea and tools being used by business for their data-handling needs. Topics will include a comparison of the leading relational database engines and object-oriented concepts and other approaches being applied to database problems. Distributed systems and client-server technologies will be discussed. Modern relational database architecture and administration will be studied.
CIS 440 3 credits
Project
Prerequisite(s): Last semester of BCIS degree program, departmental approval of a project proposal in the semester prior to taking the course. Students should consult the CIS website under “Current Students” for details
Each student, with the guidance of a faculty advisor, will complete and present a self-directed project demonstrating the skills and knowledge obtained in the CIS program. Students must submit an acceptable project proposal in the semester prior to taking CIS 440. Students should consult the CIS web site for current details about the proposal and the course requirements.
CIS 480 3 credits
Decision Support Systems
Prerequisite(s): CIS 380. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course will focus on the application of information technology in business to the solution of management problems. Students will study and use decision support systems, executive support systems, and expert systems.
CIS 485 3 credits
Ethics & Other Management Issues in IS
(formerly CIS 460)
Prerequisite(s): CIS 285. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
Issues related to the management of information technology within organizations will be discussed. Topics will include legal, ethical, and managerial issues pertaining to the impact of automation on organizations. Various models related to the management of information technology will be discussed, and the application to the solution of business problems will be illustrated through case studies. Students will be expected to research and present topics.
CIS 492 4 credits
Troubleshooting Internetworks
Prerequisite(s): CIS 392, CIS 393 and CIS 394. Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course presents advanced Internetwork troubleshooting techniques as applied to larger mixed LAN/WAN Internetworks. Hands-on network and system troubleshooting techniques will be applied to various networking technologies including complex LAN and WAN environments. Strategies for network baselining and documentation using a variety of methodologies and tools are included. This course will include the Cisco CCNP Semester 4 learning objectives.
CIS 495 3 credits
Advanced Topics in Computer Systems
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department.) Other prerequisites determined by instructor and topic
This advanced topics course is designed to provide study of the latest up-to-date technologies and issues in computer systems. Topics may be drawn from new technologies and issues in areas such as operating systems, databases, hardware, data communications, computer security, multimedia, computer ethics and management, and others. Topics will vary depending on semester and instructor. Students should consult the department for current offerings.
CIS 496 3 credits
Advanced Topics in Computer Applications
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department.) Other prerequisites determined by instructor and topic
This advanced topics course is designed to provide study of the latest up-to-date technologies and issues in computer information systems applications. Topics may be drawn from new technologies and issues in areas such as artificial intelligence, application programming, advanced website design, e-commerce, object-oriented technology, user interface design, computer graphics, CASE tools and others. Topics will vary depending on semester and instructor. Students should consult the department for current offerings.
CIS 497 3 credits
Advanced Topics in Information Security
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department). Other prerequisites determined by instructor and topic.
This advanced topics course is designed to provide study of the latest up-to-date technologies and issues in information security not covered in other courses. Topics may be drawn from areas such as physical and network security, secure programming, policies and ethics, intrusion detection, OS hardening, cryptography, cultural issues, forensic issues and others. Topics will vary depending on semester and instructor. Students should consult the department for current offerings.
Computing Science
Note: Transferability information is available online by viewing the B.C. transfer guide at www.bccat.bc.ca
Note: Additional computing courses are listed in the CIS section on page 258.
COMP 061 2 credits
Introduction to Computers
Prerequisite(s): College and Career Preparation (CCP) department permission
This course is a basic introduction to computer concepts, keyboarding, word processing, email, and Internet use for those people who have little or no experience with computers. This course is designed for students in College and Career Preperation, but others may be admitted with permission of the CCP department.
COMP 071 2 credits
Introduction to Computers (Part II)
Prerequisite(s): College and Career Preparation (CCP) department permission
This course is an intermediate computer course that combines some computer theory background, Windows environment, introduction to spreadsheets, and intermediate topics in word processing. Comp 071 is designed for students in College and Career Preparation, preferably those who have taken Comp 061, but others may be admitted with permission of the CCP department.
Note: Beginner students are advised to take Comp 061 before taking Comp 071.
COMP 073 1 credit
Online Learner Success
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is designed to introduce the learner to the skills necessary to be a successful learner in the online environment. Upon completion of the course the learner will create, send, and reply to e-mails; use basic Internet skills; WebCT; use the bulletin board and chat in WebCT.
COMP 100 3 credits
Introduction to Computing
Prerequisite(s): B.C. Principles of Math 12, or Math 094 and 095, or Math 110, or equivalent. A grade of C+ or better is required
An introduction to computer software applications and computer programming. Students will learn to use word processing and spreadsheet tools in a business environment. Students will also learn the basics of a modern programming language to create computer programs that solve business problems.
Note: Credit cannot be received for both CIS 100 and Comp 100.
COMP 125 3 credits
Principles of Computing
Prerequisite(s): B.C. Principles of Math 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of C+ or better. Familiarity with computers is essential for success; see CIS web page (www.ufv.ca/cis) for details
Pre- or corequisite(s): None
This course provides students with a broad understanding of the fundamental concepts of computing, logic, and data processing, in order to prepare them for further studies within the computing field. Concepts include introductory hardware and software architecture, models of computation, representation of data, machine arithmetic, assembler programming, command-line interfaces, and an introduction to some of the logical and mathematical ideas used in computing.
COMP 150 4 credits
Introduction to Programming
Prerequisite(s): B.C. Principles of Math 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of C+ or better. Familiarity with computers is essential for success; see CIS web page (www.ufv.ca/cis) for details
An introduction to computer programming using an object-oriented programming language. Students will cover fundamental concepts such as design of objects, interactions between objects, and implementations of object methods, through hands-on lab activities and programming assignments. Emphasis will be placed on clarity, style and design throughout.
COMP 155 4 credits
Object-oriented Programming
Prerequisite(s): Comp 150 with a grade of C+ or better, and B.C. Principles of Math 12 or Math 110or Math 095 with a C+ or better
This course continues the systematic study of programming started in Comp 150 with more details on object oriented programming and design.
COMP 250 4 credits
Windows Programming
(formerly Comp 300)
Prerequisite(s): Comp 155 and CIS 180
This is an introductory course in Windows programming using C++. Students will be introduced to the Windows API, and then will use object libraries (either Borland or Microsoft) to write applications for the most current version of Microsoft Windows. Topics include window creation, message processing, dialogs, controls, DLLs, and subclassing.
COMP 251 4 credits
Data Structures and Algorithms
(formerly Comp 175)
Prerequisite(s): Comp 155, Math 125
This course is an introduction to the abstract data structures used in the solution of common computing problems, including stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Students will apply the concepts to problems using a modern object-oriented programming language. The course will also include a discussion and assignments on the correctness and efficiency of algorithms.
COMP 256 4 credits
Introduction to Machine Architecture
Prerequisite(s): CIS 190, Comp 125, Comp 150
Pre- or corequisite(s): None
This course introduces students to microcomputer architecture. Students use a simulator to study the fundamental digital circuits in typical microcomputer hardware, and assembly language programming as a tool for understanding the computer architecture and for controlling computer hardware devices.
COMP 315 3 credits
Computer Simulation and Modelling
Prerequisite(s): Math 111, Math 113, Math 115 or Math 125. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course will provide students with additional experience in problem solving within a computer environment. Problems will be drawn from the application of quantitative analysis to decision making, including linear programming, and network, inventory, queuing, and simulation models. Emphasis will be placed on the formulation and analysis of various models using the computer to implement solutions.
COMP 340 3 credits
Operating Systems
Prerequisite(s): Comp 251. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
Students will examine computer architecture from a systems point of view and will gain an understanding of the general features that operating systems share and others that distinguish various systems. Students are also expected to do some systems programming on multi-user operating systems such as UNIX or LINUX.
COMP 350 3 credits
User Interface Design and Programming
Prerequisite(s): Comp 251. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course introduces students to some theory and practical guidelines for designing usable and enjoyable human-computer interfaces, emphasizing user-centered design and graphical user interfaces. It illustrates techniques of programming for a graphical user interface using a variety of modern programming environments and operating systems.
COMP 351 3 credits
Advanced Website Programming
Prerequisite(s): Comp 250; acceptance to CIS degree program
This course discusses the current issues involving programming for the internet. The programming language will be Java, and the course will discuss those elements of the language that support the construction of Applets for the client side and Applications for the server side. In addition, there will be a discussion of internet protocols and security issues. Finally, there will be an examination of database connectivity tools.
COMP 360 3 credits
Computer Graphics
Prerequisite(s): CIS 280 with a grade of C+ or better, and Comp 251. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course focuses on the development of Computer Graphics technology. Topics include graphics hardware, lighting models, texture models and the geometric representation of shapes and surfaces. Evaluation will be based on programming assignments and a large group-based programming project.
Note: Students cannot obtain credit for both of CIS 496 Advanced Topics in Computer Applications — Computer Graphics and Comp 360 Computer Graphics.
COMP 445 3 credits
Web Server Installation and Maintenance
(formerly Comp 355)
Prerequisite(s): CIS 341 or CIS 390. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
Students will gain hands-on experience in installing and maintaining a Web server. Both Internet and Intranet issues will be discussed. Maintenance issues such as system optimization and server activity monitoring will be discussed. In addition, server and client security will be discussed.
COMP 455 3 credits
Distributed Programming
Prerequisite(s): C+ or better in CIS 280 and Comp 351. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course focuses on the technology of distributed computation, whereby a collection of distinct programs, distributed over a network, work together to achieve a common goal. Programming models studied include CORBA and Java/RMI. This course provides degree students with advanced technical knowledge and experience with the design and deployment of complex distributed software. Distributed systems can be considered to be the place where the two major streams of the UCFV CIS program, programming and networking, meet. This course will focus on managing distributed computation, as distinct from managing distributed data.
COMP 490 3 credits
Network Security and Cryptography
Prerequisite(s): Math 106, CIS 390 with a grade of C or better. Acceptance to CIS degree program. (Students accepted to a CIS or Computing Science minor may register with permission of the department)
This course provides students with an understanding of important concepts in network security and cryptography. A practical technological survey of cryptography and network security will be given. This includes conventional encryption algorithms such as DES and IDEA, public-key design and algorithms such as RSA and elliptic curve, digital signatures and authentication protocols, key managements, and applications of authentication such as Kerberos and X.509. IP security and web security will also be covered. Network security plans and procedures will be formulated at the end.
Criminology/Criminal Justice
Many of the seats in these courses are reserved for students in a Criminal Justice program. Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space. In all courses, students who do not satisfy the prerequisites may request instructor’s permission to register in the course.
CRIM 100 3 credits
Introduction to Criminology
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the historical evolution of criminological thought and criminology as a science and a profession. The structure, content, theoretical paradigms and practical applications of the discipline are investigated as well as some of its terminology (e.g., crime, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation, and treatment).
CRIM 101 3 credits
Introduction to Corrections
Prerequisite(s): None
A historical review of correctional systems and the current theory and practice of Canadian corrections. Topics include sentencing, the incarceration process, probation, parole, institutional programs (e.g., work, education, security, social), rehabilitation, offender case management, community-based correctional programs, correctional workers, and community involvement in corrections.
CRIM 103 3 credits
Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
Prerequisite(s): None
This introductory course provides an analysis of the historical and contemporary operational practices of the criminal justice system. Beginning with the moment that a crime is reported and following the offender through the various decision stages from initial police involvement to the paroled release of a convicted offender, this course examines the use of discretion, the day-to-day practices of criminal justice personnel, and the patterns of decision making and problems that underlie the operation of the criminal justice system.
CRIM 104 3 credits
Sociological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the sociological, sociocultural, and sociopsychological explanations of criminal and deviant behaviour, which include ecological theories of crime and delinquency, conflict theories, structural theories, control theories, and symbolic-interactionist theories.
CRIM 105 3 credits
Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the causes of criminal and deviant behaviour in terms of psychological theories and suppositions, including psychophysiological, psychoanalytic, behavioural, cognitive, and biological theories. The focus of the course is on the similarities and differences across theories and research findings, and on the relationship between theories discussed and criminal justice policy.
CRIM 109 3 credits
The Administration of Justice in Canada
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the administration of justice. This includes perceptions of justice and the relationship between ideas and practice. Aspects of judicial selection and administration, Canadian political culture and civil liberties will be examined for their effects on individuals, social groups, minorities, and criminal justice as a whole.
CRIM 129 3 credits
Academic and Professional Development
(formerly Crim 329)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in the Criminal Justice program, in field placements, and on the job. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing writing skills. Opportunities will be provided for learners to assess their interests, values, beliefs, and ethical stance on critical issues. This course is required for all first-year Criminal Justice program students.
CRIM 130 3 credits
Philosophy of Law
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will discuss natural law and positive law, law and morality, law and justice, law and civil disobedience, national and international law, as well as the social function of law and the validity and limitation of law. The course will also examine various treatments of responsibility, guilt, punishment, deterrence, and retribution. We will approach these issues from a historical perspective; this method will guide us to the significant questions and the various answers that have been offered.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Crim 130 and Phil 230 (formerly 130).
CRIM 135 3 credits
Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective
Prerequisite(s): None
A general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. Prepares students for those law and law-related courses offered within the department. Considers the history of Canadian law, development of the Canadian Constitution, the system of Canadian courts and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course will consider the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and principles of statutory interpretation, and will also include the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Also examines the process of law reform in Canada.
CRIM 151 3 credits
Introduction to Law Enforcement
Prerequisite(s): None
The course surveys law enforcement agencies, including their role in society, their organizational structure and management, and community expectations of their task. Specific police functions (e.g., patrol, investigation, traffic control, work with juveniles, crisis intervention) and powers (e.g., arrest, search and seizure) are closely examined. Attention is also given to the training of police officers and to policing as an occupation. Behavioural aspects of policing and an assessment of police effectiveness are emphasized.
CRIM 160 3 credits
Problem Management Skills for Criminal Justice Interventions
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students with training in the assessment and management of various problems encountered by criminal justice officials. Students will learn how to choose the most appropriate intervention strategies for a wide range of situations. We will examine theories and develop skills for successful interventions with juvenile and less mature adults (behavioural and cognitive approaches) as well as for individuals who are capable of responding to more complex (affective) intervention strategies, such as problem specification, decision-making, and action-planning. The course introduces strategies for negotiation, mediation, crisis management, conflict de-escalation, and facilitating group decision-making. The course also includes a focus on the necessary ethical dimension of all professional interventions in the criminal justice field.
Note: Students who have taken the (now discontinued) Crim 270 course may use it for this requirement.
CRIM 201 2 credits
Physical Fitness Training I
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides an individualized fitness program utilizing modern health-club facilities and sophisticated evaluation procedures. Students will be required to attend health-club facilities three times per week.
Note: Crim 201/202 cannot be taken concurrently.
CRIM 202 2 credits
Physical Fitness Training II
Prerequisite(s): None
The course provides a continuation of CRIM 201. Each student’s program will be re-evaluated and intensified.
Note: Crim 201/202 cannot be taken concurrently.
CRIM 203 2 credits
Peace Officer Use of Force
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students with an opportunity to learn and practise physical contact tactics specifically related to law enforcement.
CRIM 205 3 credits
Police Psychology and Risk Assessment
Prerequisite(s): Crim 105, or students with related work experience may request a prerequisite waiver from the instructor
This course provides an introduction to the assessment of risk for sexually deviant and violent behaviour. Students will learn the factors correlated to the prediction of violent and sexually deviant behaviour including psychopathy, mental illness, personality disorders, and developmental history. The effect of substance abuse on an individual’s propensity for violence and criminal behaviour will also be explored
CRIM 210 3 credits
Youth Crime and the Youth Justice System in Canada
Prerequisite(s): None
The course provides students with an analysis of the nature, prevalence, characteristics, and consequences of youth crime in Canada. It offers an overview of the political, social, legal, and criminological issues associated with youth crime in Canada. The historical development of Canada’s juvenile justice and child protection systems is examined as well as the legal framework established by the Youth Criminal Justice Act. That statute is reviewed in detail and in relation to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and various other international human rights standards. The objectives pursued by the youth criminal justice system are examined in relation to prevailing scientific and popular explanations of juvenile deviance and delinquency. The relative effectiveness of the youth justice system in preventing and responding to youth crime is also considered.
CRIM 211 3 credits
Indigenous Peoples, Crime and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): None
An examination of some of the major historical and contemporary issues regarding indigenous peoples, crime, and the criminal justice system. Some of the issues to be explored include the impact of colonization, Aboriginal involvement with the police, courts, and corrections, government policies and programs aimed at reducing Aboriginal conflict with the law, and the increasing role of Aboriginal communities in implementing justice initiatives.
CRIM 212 3 credits
Women, Crime and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the nature of crimes committed by females and some of the sociological, sociocultural, and sociopsychological explanations of this criminal and deviant behaviour. Women’s experiences as survivors and victims of criminal behaviour and as professionals working within the criminal justice system will be explored. Societal responses to female victims, offenders, and professionals will be examined.
CRIM 213 3 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
Independent reading and research topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Students interested in more information should contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department.
CRIM 214 3 credits
Selected Topics
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will review theory, methods, and research results in a selected area of criminal justice. Students should check with the Criminology and Criminal Justice department to determine the content area for a particular semester.
CRIM 215 3 credits
Theory and Practice of Restorative Justice
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students with an introduction to the theory and practice of restorative justice. Theoretical, historical, and philosophical perspectives on restorative justice will be analyzed. Foundational principles and values of restorative justice will be explored in the context of restorative justice as a response to crime and violence distinct from traditional methods within the criminal justice system. A variety of processes and program models for restorative justice will also be examined with emphasis on program effectiveness.
CRIM 220 3 credits
Research Methods in Criminology
Prerequisite(s): Crim 100 and one of: Crim 104, Crim 105, Psyc 101 or Soc 101
This course is designed as an introduction to criminological research and is intended to develop the students’ research and analytical skills. The course will focus on the theory of inquiry, the logic, reality and structure of criminological inquiry, and criminological data analysis and reporting.
CRIM 230 3 credits
Criminal Law
Prerequisite(s): None
Investigates the nature, purpose, scope, sources and basic principles of criminal law within its historical and contemporary contexts. The evolution of such legal concepts as guilt, criminal responsibility, and due process of law is also studied. Current policy and legislation, e.g. the legislative policy inherent in the Criminal Code, the specific offenses and categories in the Criminal Code, the Young Offenders Act (Canada), the Protection of Children Act (B.C.), and the control and treatment of drug addicts, dangerous sexual offenders, habitual criminals, and mentally ill offenders, are examined in detail.
CRIM 250 3 credits
Customs and Immigration Law
Prerequisite(s): None
For students considering a career in customs or immigration, as well as for those with particular interest in this area, this course examines the Customs and Excise division of Revenue Canada, as well as the federal Immigration department, from an organizational and legal perspective. The course covers the role of Customs and Excise as a part of the Revenue Canada mandate, relevant legislation such as the Customs Act and the Narcotic Control Act, current issues surrounding Customs policies, as well as internal regulatory procedures (e.g., search and seizure, appeal procedures and citizen’s rights). Also included are the other issues which relate to the Customs and Immigration authority, such as primary duties and relevant sections of the Criminal Code of Canada.
CRIM 260 3 credits
Methods of Intervention in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Crim 160 (or the now discontinued Crim 270)
This course will introduce students to a range of basic methods of professional intervention frequently applied in the field of criminal justice. It focuses on methods of diagnosing and assessing problem situations as a prerequisite to strategic and effective intervention. Successful students will achieve an intermediate level of proficiency in the practice of several commonly used methods of intervention, including negotiation, mediation, arbitration, critical incident debriefing, crisis/conflict management, and group processes facilitation. Students will also further practise and improve upon some of the communication, interviewing, and analytical skills developed in Crim 160.
Note: Students who have taken the (now discontinued) Crim 271 course may use it for this requirement.
CRIM 261 3 credits
Investigative Interviewing
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 160
This course explores the theory and practice of police (investigative) interviewing and interrogation. Course content will include the application of law (procedural and evidentiary), along with the application of psycho-physiological, psychological, and analytical paradigms. The course will include simulated exercises where such theories are applied to the practice of police interviewing and interrogation.
CRIM 262 3 credits
Field Mentoring
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 151 and Crim 160
This course introduces students to the leadership role of the (police) field coach. It emphasizes the theory of coaching for performance techniques, but also provides practical instructional techniques for coaches (e.g., coaching for tutoring, for confrontation, and for skill building), as well as learning strategies for the person being coached. The course reviews problem oriented policing theory and how it should be used by police cadets for solving projects.
CRIM 263 3 credits
Police Supervision
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 160
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of personnel supervision. Topics include effective communication with subordinates, peers, supervisors, and the general public; effective interviewing and counselling skills; and identifying leadership styles and the use of a flexible approach to applying different leadership styles.
CRIM 264 3 credits
Interactive Leadership
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 160
This course explores the theory and practice of leadership in policing, emphasizing the interpersonal and relational attributes and processes of leaders. Leadership and management are compared and contrasted, and the leader’s role in developing an ethical workforce is examined. Seminal motivational concepts are reviewed, particularly as they apply to the policing environment, and these concepts are used in the study of employee commitment. The coaching role of the leader is analyzed, and various coaching functions (coaching for assistance, tutoring, performance, correction and growth) are reviewed and practised. A feedback system is reviewed and practised and issues specific to both problem performance and troubled employees are addressed. Finally, leadership priorities and value management concerns are reviewed.
CRIM 270 4 credits
Intro to Forensic Biology
Prerequisite(s): five university transfer courses, one of which must be from the following list: Bio 105, Bio 106, Bio 111, Bio 112 or Chem 150
This course introduces the student to the techniques involved in locating, processing and interpreting forensic scenes with human remains. Students will learn to interpret the effects of biological and environmental factors on forensic scenes. Students will learn basic osteology so that they can identify human remains, determine their sex, age, ancestry, and stature and correctly interpret any associated trauma to the bones. This course includes a required one-day field exercise. Students must have a current tetanus shot.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Crim 270 and Bio 270.
CRIM 281 6 credits
Field Work Practicum
Prerequisite(s): Crim 100, 103, 104 and 105, Crim 160, and one of: (Cmns 125, Cmns 155 or Engl 105 or higher); and instructor’s permission
Supervised experience in work situations in which you may later be employed. You will have an opportunity to practise skills gained in prerequisite courses and will receive feedback about your competencies. A field work practicum may be innovative and respond to community need. There will be a monthly feedback seminar with your instructor.
Note: Students must meet with the Career Development Coordinator to confirm a practicum placement and sign a practicum agreement prior to receiving permission to register.
CRIM 291 3 credits
Theory and Practice of Criminal Investigations
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 151 and Crim 160
This course is intended for those who are or will be responsible for the investigation and follow-up of criminal offences. Core topics provide a foundation for investigation skills, and include principles of human behaviour, effective communication techniques with victims, working with witnesses and offenders, principles of crime scene examinations, substantive criminal law and criminal evidence and procedure (e.g., principles of taking statements and confessions), human source handling, and the investigation of high profile offences. The intent is to achieve a sound approach to handling any investigative responsibilities.
CRIM 292 6 credits
Theory and Practice of Drug Investigations
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 151 and Crim 160
This course examines the unique investigative procedures that are essential to drug enforcement and the investigation of major drug offences. The course also examines the statutes and jurisprudence uniquely related to drug enforcement. Topics include professionalism, street level enforcement, and investigations relating to importing, exporting, cultivating, and trafficking.
CRIM 293 3 credits
Theory and Practice of Fire Investigations II
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 151, Crim 160, and either Crim 291 or Crim 292
This course examines basic fire investigation techniques that, when combined with expert assistance, will enhance the success of fire investigations, which are recognized as among the most difficult types of investigations. In particular, the course examines how fire scene investigations can scientifically determine whether the fire was deliberately set. The course includes field studies (labs) to introduce students to actual on-the-scene fire investigations.
CRIM 295 3 credits
Theory and Practice of Accident Investigation II
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program
This course examines the theory and practice of traffic collision investigations and is designed for police who specialize in traffic accident investigations and general duty officers whose responsibilities include investigating vehicle collisions. The course will provide investigators with advanced skills and techniques for understanding accident dynamics, reconstructing accidents from objective evidence, documenting collision investigations, assessing liability, and giving expert court evidence
CRIM 296 6 credits
Theory and Practice of Accident Investigation III
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program, Crim 295 and Principles of Math 11
Recommended: CMNS 235 or Effective Presentation course, and Airbrake Inspection course
This course examines the theory and practice of traffic collision investigations and is designed for police who specialize in traffic accident investigations. It will provide investigators with advanced skills and techniques for understanding accident dynamics, reconstructing accidents from objective evidence, documenting collision investigations, assessing liability, and giving expert court evidence. This course builds upon the skills learned in Accident Investigation Level II. As a result, students who successfully complete Level III can be qualified to present “expert” (opinion) evidence in court and in coroner’s inquests.
CRIM 299 3 credits
The Theory and Practice of Sexual Assault Investigations
Prerequisite(s): None
This course explores the issues relevant to a police officer assigned to investigate cases of sexual offences, including sexual offences against children, in the Canadian criminal justice system. It examines the investigative process and follows a case from reporting to sentencing. Examined in some detail are Criminal Code sexual offences, rules of evidence and procedure related to sex-crime prosecutions, the accommodations for children and/or vulnerable witnesses and the control and treatment of sex offenders, and dangerous offenders including youthful offenders. The course also examines where the social science and law meet to embrace the complexity of these cases.
CRIM 310 3 credits
Advanced Theoretical Perspectives
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits), and Crim 100, 104 and 105
This course explores the diverse nature of theory within the field of crime and deviance by focusing on modern and post-modern theories. The selected paradigms are studied with regard to their explanatory domain, role in examining social and criminological problems, and research implications.
CRIM 311 3 credits
Multiculturalism, Conflict, and Social Justice
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100 and 103
This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the conflict which various cultural and ethnic groups have experienced, historically and during contemporary times, with the criminal law and the criminal justice system in Canada. This course examines the multicultural fabric of Canadian society and its implications for social and criminal justice. This course examines some of the critical areas related to cultural and ethnic groups and the criminal justice system. Students will be exposed to a myriad of materials and ideas and be challenged to consider the complex issues which surround crime and criminal justice in a multicultural society.
CRIM 320 5 credits
Quantitative Research Techniques
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits), a C or better in Math 104 and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 220.
This course is designed to more fully introduce criminology and criminal justice students to applied social research. Emphasis is placed on developing practical experience in a variety of research methods and techniques. Students will become familiar with quantitative research methods. Experience will be gained in questionnaire design, data analyses and technical report writing. Some of the problems routinely confronting research practitioners are also examined. Students will also gain practical experience in using a statistical program on computers to analyze data.
CRIM 330 3 credits
Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 103 and 230
Critical examination of selected topics in criminal procedure and evidence. Analysis and cross-national comparisons of how criminal cases are processed through the court system. Brief survey of the system of rules and standards by means of which the admissibility of evidence is determined. Close examination of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its impact on criminal procedure and evidence.
CRIM 335 3 credits
Human Rights and Civil Liberties
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100. Posc 110 is strongly recommended
A study of the relationship between government and individuals. This course focuses on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its interpretation by our judiciary. It includes an examination of the issues of equality before the law, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, hate literature, and obscenity, as well as consideration of the rights of incarcerated individuals and the rights of individuals designated as mentally disordered. It also includes an examination of “victimless crimes”, such as drug use, prostitution, and gambling, as areas of civil libertarian concern.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Crim 335 and POSC 335
CRIM 339 3 credits
Professional Ethics in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Crim 103; and acceptance into the diploma in Criminal Justice program or into a degree program
This course studies professional ethics in the criminal justice system, with a special focus on law enforcement. The course will be organized into four subject areas: ethics education; dominant theoretical approaches (social contract, utilitarianism, formalism, and virtue theory); development of professional ethics; and ethical leadership. These subjects will be grounded in contemporary issues that criminal justice practitioners must address on a daily basis.
CRIM 391 6 credits
The Theory and Practice of Major Case Management
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 151 and Crim 160, and one of Crim 291or Crim 292 or Crim 392
The proliferation of complex and serious incidents across the country makes it essential for investigative agencies to maintain personnel capable of managing major case (large and complex) investigations. This course provides qualified investigators with the knowledge and skills required to macro-manage the resources and the direction/speed/flow of a coordinated and/or integrated investigation team using a criminal investigative approach.
CRIM 392 6 credits
The Theory and Practice of Major Crime Investigation
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 151 and Crim 160, and either Crim 291or Crim 292
This course is designed to provide experienced police officers who are assigned to investigate major crimes with the skills, knowledge and abilities to conduct successful investigations into crimes such as murder, sexual assault, child abuse, conspiracy and other complex crimes. The course examines topics related to advanced law (statements, search and seizure), advanced forensics (such as DNA and blood spatter evidence), and crime analysis.
CRIM 393 3 credits
Criminal Intelligence and Crime Analysis
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 151 and Crim 160
This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of criminal intelligence in the Canadian law enforcement setting. The broad themes covered include tactical, strategic and environmental intelligence; sources and methods of gathering intelligence; intelligence analysis and its application; management of intelligence; linking intelligence to enforcement; and risks and limitations of intelligence. The overall goal of the course is to impart an understanding of how criminal intelligence practices can be applied within contemporary Canadian policing, in a manner which is both relevant to enforcement and conditioned by case law and applicable statutes.
CRIM 394 6 credits
Theory and Practice of Accident Investigation IV
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and Crim 296
[Airbrake Inspection course and Motorcycle Operator Training recommended]
This course examines the theory and practice of traffic collision investigations and is designed for police who specialize in traffic accident investigations. It will provide investigators with advanced skills and techniques for understanding accident dynamics, reconstructing accidents from objective evidence, documenting collision investigations, assessing liability, and giving expert court evidence. The course builds upon the skills learned in Accident Investigation Level II and Level III, where some of the topics are similar but the material is more advanced and complex.
CRIM 410 3 credits
Selected Topics in Crime and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Will vary depending on topic: permission of Criminology and Criminal Justice department or the instructor.
This course critically reviews theory, methods, and research results in a selected area of criminal justice. Students should check with the Criminology and Criminal Justice department or the timetable to determine content area and prerequisites for a particular semester.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 411 3 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission
Independent reading and research topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Students interested in more information should contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 412 3 credits
Organized Crime
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100 and 103
This course will examine the issues surrounding organized crime in North American society, while advancing a critical analysis of this subject area. The analysis will primarily be grounded in theory as well as in an applied research approach which emphasizes a police and government functional and operational perspective. While concentrating on sociological and criminological theory, the approach to this topic is multi-disciplinary and will involve other fields, including economics, history, political science, criminal intelligence, and operations theory, among others.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 413 3 credits
History and Philosophy of Police Practices
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100 and 151
This course surveys contemporary police practices (such as organization, enforcement emphasis, recruiting, community relations, role in politics, response to crime, use of force) in the modern world, with a special emphasis on democratic states. Consequently, international police practices will be examined in the context of their historical and philosophical roots. Although there will be a special emphasis on policing in Canada, the general concept of policing in a democracy will be examined through a comparative study of policing in countries such as England, the United States, France, Israel, and others.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 414 3 credits
Intervention Techniques in Corrections
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100 and 101
This course will examine the methods and means that criminal justice system personnel and associated professionals use to change criminal behaviour. The primary focus of these intervention techniques is to reduce recidivism. The course will review techniques that span from supervision to psychotherapy both inside and outside of jail or prison. The course is to develop the ability to critically analyze the theoretical foundations and treatment effectiveness (e.g., quantitative outcome research) of approaches in this area.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 416 3 credits
Media, Crime, and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100 and 103
This course focuses on the relationship between society’s primary system of information dissemination, the media, and its primary system of social control and social value legitimation, the criminal justice system. Various aspects of this relationship are examined, with particular reference to the “social construction of reality”, the notion that the media are especially important in constructing our image of the social world, which we come to accept as “objective” social reality. Topics include the constructionist view of the role of media in society; contextual and content analysis of media content; gender, crime and the media; crime and justice in the news; the role of the media in creating and maintaining ideologies about crime; media influences on attitudes and beliefs about crime and the criminal justice system; media distortion and sensationalism; media as a cause of crime; and media as a cure for crime.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 417 3 credits
Leadership in Groups and Organizations
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits), Bus 203 or Bus 307 and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100
This course will prepare those currently in supervisory or management positions (or those who seek to be) to assess and develop their potential for leadership. Learners will understand the differences between leadership and management, study an overview of leadership theory, and learn a new model for transformative leadership interventions in groups and organizations. As potential agents of positive change, students will assess and develop key knowledge and skill areas which will enable them to facilitate the development of individuals, groups and organizations. Finally, learners will develop the ability to shift styles, skills and roles appropriately, thereby increasing the effectiveness of their interventions. The knowledge and skills in this course will be applicable to a wide range of settings in the criminal justice system.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 418 3 credits
Techniques of Crime Prevention
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100 and 103
Critical examination of the contemporary field of crime prevention. This course will examine the theoretical foundations of various approaches to crime prevention and the evaluative research available to assess the efficacy of these initiatives.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 419 3 credits
Victimology
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100 and 103
Analysis of the phenomenon of criminal victimization. Review historical development of victimology, its scope and subject matter. Characteristics of the victim population and the profile of the typical victim. An in-depth analysis of the extent and patterns of criminal victimization, victimizers’ attitudes to their victims, victim/target selection. Examination of the theoretical explanations of the differential risks of criminal victimization, focusing on multiple victimization, lifestyle/routine activity/opportunity models and the possibility of developing an integrated model of criminal victimization.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.
CRIM 420 6 credits
Research Project/Seminar
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and Crim 320
This course is designed as an upper-level research seminar in criminology and criminal justice. To successfully meet the requirements of this seminar, students must first demonstrate an ability to review and critique examples of research within Criminology and Criminal Justice. This component of Criminology 420 requires students to assume an active and independent role in acquiring and demonstrating research expertise. Secondly, students must complete a research project. Relying on research skills acquired in Mathematics 104, Criminology 220 and Criminology 320, students are expected to demonstrate their ability to design and complete a research project in a timely fashion.
CRIM 450 3 credits
Social Policy Analysis
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower level Crim including Crim 100 and 103
This course explores various aspects of policy, planning, and analysis as they relate to social policy and criminal justice policy.
CRIM 460 3 credits
Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level Crim including Crim 100 and 103
Critical examination of the theory and method of comparative criminal justice. Review of common law, civic law, and socialist law systems. Specific consideration of the development, structure and operation of the criminal justice systems in selected countries, which may include England, France, Germany, China, and Japan. Focus on the impact of historical, social, political, religious and cultural factors on the criminal justice process. Consideration of the structure and operation of various components of the criminal justice process in selected countries, including the police, criminal courts, and corrections.
CRIM 470 4 credits
Advanced Forensic Biology
Prerequisite(s): Crim 270 or Bio 270
This course further develops the investigative techniques and methodology of forensic biology. Topics of further study will include the investigation and methods of processing and interpreting human remains. Students will use biological and physical features of the environment to interpret remains recovered from buried, scattered, underwater (ocean and freshwater), and arson scenes. Advanced studies will examine juvenile and developmental osteology. New advancements in the field involving DNA and individualizing techniques will also be examined. This course includes a required one-day field exercise. Students must have a current tetanus shot and steel toed boots.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Crim 470 and Bio 470.
CRIM 480 6 credits
Field Work Practicum
Prerequisite(s): Crim 280 or 281, Crim 310, Crim 311, Crim 320, Crim 330, Crim 335, and instructor’s permission
Supervised work experience in a criminal justice agency. The goals and objectives of this course are similar to the field work practicum in Crim 281/281 however, higher levels of performance are required.
CRIM 481 6 credits
Field Work Practicum
Prerequisite(s): Crim 281, Crim 310, Crim 311, Crim 320, Crim 330, Crim 335 and instructor’s permission
This is a supervised work experience in a criminal justice or community agency. The goals and objectives of this course are similar to the field work practicum in Crim 280/281; however, more advanced levels of performance are required. (enrollment in this course is by prior arrangement with the Career Development Coordinator, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice)
CRIM 700 3 credits
Crime, Criminals, Victims, and the Criminal Justice System
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This is a foundations course which will critically examine the goals, structure, and practices of the criminal justice system in terms of its capacity to respond to the problems of crime and criminals, and the needs of victims and the community. Attention will be given to what we can learn from criminal justice systems, initiatives, and best practices internationally from a historical perspective. Special attention will be given to our approach to current, emerging, and long-standing problems in the Canadian criminal justice system.
CRIM 705 3 credits
Policy Analysis and Social Justice
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to examine major issues in the field of policy analysis within a framework of social justice. Students will develop an understanding of a variety of policy and analysis models and major analytical activities including the examination of the social, political, historical, and economic context within which policy alternatives are assessed; the identification and mapping of interest group and stakeholder dynamics; and the application of efficacy criteria to policy options. Students will examine the foundational role that problem construction plays in policy development and analysis. The course will bridge the theoretical and conceptual components of policy analysis with practical applications of the techniques.
CRIM 710 3 credits
Change Management in the Criminal Justice System
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course will focus on the application of systems theory, and the principles and theories of change to the management of criminal justice systems. Attention will be give to challenges in implementing change, why certain policies and practices seem resistant to change, and the role of activism and leadership in creating change. Students will learn how to anticipate, plan, implement, and evaluate change. They will also learn how to write and present a change management plan. Research on changing and future trends will be in focus throughout the course.
CRIM 715 4 credits
Advanced Research Methods
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course focuses on the knowledge and skills students need to conduct both qualitative and quantitative research, critique published research, and build research designs from a theoretical perspective and action research framework. Special attention will be given to data collection, construction, and qualitative analysis, and statistical techniques using SPSS.
CRIM 720 3 credits
Community Development, Justice Initiatives, and Governance in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program and Crim 715
This course examines the changing role and capacity of government and criminal justice agencies in responding to crime. The emphasis will be on analysis of “responsibilization” and mobilization strategies involving individuals, families, community organizations, the private sector, and communities in general. Special attention will be given to social justice initiatives, partnership models, governing at a distance, and the need for new, innovative, and broadly-based approach to crime prevention.
CRIM 725 3 credits
Evaluation Research
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop an understanding of different evaluative designs and the role that theory, methods, and statistics play in the field of program evaluation. Students will use a framework of evidence-based decision-making to guide their exploration of program logic models, process and outcome evaluative designs, settings in which evaluations are conducted, and ethical considerations of evaluation research. This course will enable students to design and conduct evaluation studies and will contribute to their ability to engage in program and policy development.
CRIM 730 3 credits
Ethical and Legal Issues in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
The emphasis of this course will be on professional (applied) ethics within the field of criminal justice and as such will focus on how practitioners ought to treat others within the context of their respective vocations. To ground the discussion, the connection between the idea of morality and theories of ethics will be explored, along with the progressively dominant role that law is currently playing in professional ethics. At the same time, there will be an analysis of contemporary issues, both ethical and legal, that are especially relevant in the criminal justice professions. The objective is that students, from both moral and legal points of view, will be able to justify positions taken on ethical dilemmas and problems that they are likely to face within their chosen professions.
CRIM 735 3 credits
Leadership and Organizational Development in the Criminal Justice System
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course prepares students to conduct leadership competency assessments and organizational effectiveness audits, and to design and implement strategic plans. There is a special emphasis in the course on the theory and practice of quality management through continuous improvement initiatives that lead to the development of a learning organization that can demonstrate accountability for the achievement of organizational objectives.
CRIM 740 3 credits
Criminal Justice Planning and Budgeting
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course is designed to help students understand the interactive process and political context of planning and financial management, principles of accounting and public sector budgeting, audits, and the requirements of budget preparation.
CRIM 745 3 credits
Human Resource Administration
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course focuses on issues in personnel management relating to job analysis, performance appraisal, productivity assessment, compensation, recruitment, selection, promotion, career development, disciplinary systems and civil liability, collective bargaining agreements and other labour management matters.
CRIM 750 3 credits
Directed Studies
This course allows students to focus on a specific criminal justice issue from the perspective and guidance of a discipline other than criminal justice. This course will be of particular interest to students whose thesis/project area requires an in-depth understanding of a body of research and literature outside the criminal justice field.
CRIM 755 3 credits
Selected Topics
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program. Faculty approval required.
This course allows students to focus on a specific criminal justice issue from the perspective and guidance of a discipline other than criminal justice. This course will be of particular interest to students whose thesis/project area requires an in-depth understanding of a body of research and literature outside the criminal justice field.
CRIM 760 6 credits
Internship
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program, completion of Crim 700, Crim 705, Crim 710, Crim 715, Crim 720, Crim 725, and Crim 798. Faculty approval required
The internship offers students the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills gained through the program to a full-time four-month practicum experience by assuming a key role in program or policy development, implementation, or evaluation in a criminal justice agency or organization concerned with criminal justice issues. The internship will also provide an opportunity for students to study specific criminal justice practices abroad, and for students who wish to focus on a criminal justice issue from an international perspective.
CRIM 798 1 credit
Thesis/Project Preparation Seminar
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course is designed to help students develop their thesis/project proposal. The course will focus on refining research questions, and developing a specific research plan, setting the foundation for agency and key stakeholder involvement, ethics approval, and thesis/project requirements. It will also emphasize the importance of conducting a thesis/project from a leadership perspective. Students will be expected to produce a draft proposal as a primary requirement for the course.
CRIM 799 6 credits
Thesis/Evaluation Project
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program, completion of all course work in Semesters 1, 2, 3, and 4
Critical Analysis and Study Methodology
CSM 104 3 credits
Integrated Academic Learning Skills
Prerequisite(s): C+ or better in ESL WG74 and R70, or articulated equivalent.
Pre- or corequisite(s): ESL WG84 or articulated equivalent.
This course is designed specifically for international education students to academically support their first year courses. Topics covered include analytical listening strategies, contemporary study approaches, and interactive group communication. CSM 104 uses current post-secondary course materials with an emphasis on scholarly research to explore individual learning differences and approaches to the disciplines.
Note: This course is not equivalent to CSM 108.
CSM 108 3 credits
Critical Analysis and Study Methodology
Prerequisite(s): ESL students must have ESL WG84, ESL S76, ESL L87, ESL R80, or permission of the instructor
If you are returning after a period of absence from student life, or if you need to improve your ability to understand university-college material as well as improve your study efficiency, you should register for this course. CSM 108 covers the techniques needed to succeed in your other subjects: Critical thinking, exam preparation and writing, stress and time management, essay writing overview, note taking, study methods, fast textbook reading, and strategies for active learning in the content areas.
CSM 208 3 credits
Advanced Critical Analysis and Learning Methodology
(formerly CMNS 208)
Prerequisite(s): CSM 108; CMNS 125 or CMNS 155
A continuation of the principles and skills learned in CSM 108 and introduces students to the next level of critical thinking and higher education learning through course presentation and assignments. Students will learn effective strategies to enable them to work independently as well as work effectively in a group setting. Lecture examples and assignments will be linked, wherever possible, to academic content in other courses.
Early Childhood Education
Most of the seats in these courses are normally reserved for students in an Early Childhood Education program. Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space. Completion of certificate and/or diploma provides block transfer to UVic (up to 30 credits for the certificate and a maximum of 60 credits for the diploma).
ECE 100 3 credits
Human Development I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to, or permission from, the ECE program
This course focuses on the methods used by psychologists and educators in learning more about children. It introduces students to major theories of human development, cognitive, and social-emotional development from conception to the age of two.
ECE 101 3 credits
Foundation of Early Childhood Education
(formerly ECE 121)
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the ECE program or permission from program head
Corequisite(s): First semester course
Introduces students to the history and philosophies of the ECE field; to the legal, fiscal, and social contexts of ECE; and to the variety of programs and learning environments for groups of young children.
ECE 102 3 credits
Introduction to Early Childhood Guidance
(formerly ECE 131)
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the ECE program
Introduces students to the history and philosophies of the ECE field; to the legal, fiscal and social contexts of ECE; and to the variety of programs and learning environments for groups of young children; and especially to the role of the early childhood education in guiding and caring for young children.
ECE 103 3 credits
Introduction to Observing and Recording Behaviour of Young Children
(formerly ECE 141)
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to the ECE program
This course introduces systematic observation, the purpose of observation, and the particular methods for collecting and recording information about young children. Students will implement various observational techniques in the field.
ECE 120 3 credits
Human Development II
(formerly ECE 200)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of first semester of ECE program
Corequisite(s): Second semester courses
This course is a continuation of ECE 100, focusing on physical, cognitive, and psycho-social development in children ages 2 to 18 with an emphasis on theory and current research.
ECE 122 6 credits
Introductory Practicum
(formerly ECE 241)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the first semester of the ECE program
Corequisite(s): ECE 125 and ECE 120 (if not completed previously)
Through selected field site practicum placements and seminars, participants will put ECE theories into practice, document their experiences, and plan and evaluate their learning cooperatively with sponsor supervisors, the instructor, and seminar colleagues.
ECE 123 1.5 credits
Art in Early Childhood Education
(formerly ECE 353)
Prerequisite(s): First semester ECE courses
Corequisite(s): Second semester ECE courses
Through an exploration of the young child as an artist, the connection between theory and practice will become evident when students become aware of creativity as individual expression. The implementation of aesthetic and sensory experiences appropriate to the developing child will guide students’ appreciation of art as an integral part of programming.
ECE 124 3 credits
Music in Early Childhood Education
(formerly ECE 254)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of first semester of ECE program
This course is designed to promote personal growth in awareness, appreciation and enjoyment of music. It includes an overview of music as it relates to children’s concepts including timbre, dynamics, pitch, rhythm, tempo, and melody. Students will have the opportunity to explore theory and application in the areas of singing, instruments, movement, and listening
Note: Students should complete first semester courses before registering.
ECE 125 3 credits
Early Childhood Programs
(formerly ECE 221)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of first semester of ECE program
Corequisite(s): ECE 120 and ECE 122 (if not completed previously)
Theory and practice of creating effective learning/caring programs for children through goal-setting, preparation, implementation, and evaluation.
ECE 130 3 credits
Presenting Literature to Children
(formerly ECE 255)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of second semester of the ECE certificate program
An experiential examination of a variety of methods of helping young children to become involved in and enjoy literature. Topics include creative drama, play-acting, writing and reading poetry, story-telling, puppetry, and the history of children’s literature.
ECE 132 3 credits
Nutrition, Health, and Safety
(formerly ECE 351)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of second semester of ECE program
Corequisite(s): Third semester ECE courses
Consideration of the health and nutritional needs of young children. Topics include nutrition, food storage, preparation and presentation, Ministry of Health requirements, safety planning, emergency procedures, first aid, and childhood illnesses.
ECE 133 6 credits
Advanced Practicum
(formerly ECE 341)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of second semester of the ECE program
Corequisite(s): One of the following courses: ECE 132, ECE 123, ECE 130, and/or ECE 135
A continuation of ECE 122 in which the student practises more advanced competencies including parent interaction, self-evaluation, and peer evaluation.
ECE 135 3 credits
The Process of Curriculum Development
(formerly ECE 361)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of second semester courses of the ECE program
Corequisite(s): Third semester ECE courses
An experiential workshop course focusing on the relevant factors affecting curriculum planning for groups of preschool children with a focus on science, math, and social studies.
Note: The prerequisites to all diploma program courses are: completion of third semester or provincial ECE certification.
ECE 160 3 credits
Introduction to Disabilities
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program
This course is intended to introduce students to specific disabilities, and the family, social, and educational issues that can be affected during the lifespan.
ECE 213 3 credits
Atypical Development
(formerly ECE 413)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the ECE diploma program
An introduction to understanding the development of exceptional children and the variety and range of developmental differences.
ECE 223 3 credits
Administration of Childhood Centres
(formerly ECE 423)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program
This course is designed for preschool/daycare centre supervisors and/or potential administrators. The emphasis is on developing sound program management and fiscal management skills with a focus on interpersonal relationships. Students are introduced to the responsibilities of an administrator in terms of setting up and/or maintaining an ongoing program in different types of early childhood centres.
ECE 224 3 credits
Working with Families
(formerly ECE 424)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program
This course examines public and governmental policy, social issues, and cultural influences as they relate to and affect children and their families. Both historical and contemporary perspectives will be explored. This examination will include a review of the theoretical underpinnings while emphasizing practical applications.
ECE 242 6 credits
Practicum: Special Needs
(formerly ECE 442)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program, ECE 213 and 260. Could seek permission of the department head
Pre- or corequisite(s): ECE 281
Students work directly with children who require extra support in a variety of settings that promote skill acquisition and integration of theory into practice. Students must be prepared to be available regular daytime work hours for practicum.
ECE 243 6 credits
Practicum: Infancy
(formerly ECE 443)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program, ECE 213 and 269
Corequisite(s): ECE 282
Students work directly with infants in a variety of settings; emphasis is on observing, recording, health and safety issues and transfer of infant care theory into practice. Students must be prepared to be available regular daytime work hours for practicum.
ECE 260 3 credits
Foundations of Working with Exceptional Children
(formerly ECE 460)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program
To understand present practices in early childhood special education, the history of the education and care of exceptional children will be investigated. Definitions of exceptionality will be explored, including giftedness. The intent of this course is to lead students to a personal philosophical statement of principles and rights of the exceptional child.
ECE 269 3 credits
Foundations of Infant Caregiving
(formerly ECE 469)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program, or permission of department
An examination of historical methods of infant caregiving and the development of philosophies and methods up to the present time.
ECE 281 3 credits
Programming for Exceptional Children
(formerly ECE 481)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program
Pre- or corequisite(s): ECE 242
A problem-solving approach is taken to the programming needs of exceptional children in nursery schools, daycare centres, kindergartens, and after school programs.
ECE 282 3 credits
Programming for Infants
(formerly ECE 482)
Prerequisite(s): Admission to ECE diploma program
Pre- or corequisite(s): ECE 213 & 269
Instruction in theory and practice of infant care, birth to age three.
ECE 291 1.5 credits
Current Developments in ECE I
(formerly ECE 491)
Prerequisite(s): None
A selection of current topics are addressed in workshop or mini-course format or as summer institutes. This course may be taken more than once for credit, provided the course content is different from that previously taken.
ECE 298 3 credits
Directed Studies in ECE I
(formerly ECE 498)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students opportunities to work on research projects, directed readings, or additional course work in a specified area.
ECE 299 1.5 credits
Directed Studies in ECE II
(formerly ECE 499)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students opportunities to work on research projects, directed readings, or additional course work in a specified area.
Economics
ECON 100 3 credits
Principles of Microeconomics
Prerequisite(s): None
This is the classic “first principles course” which presumes no prior study of economics and provides powerful insights in consumer and business decision-making. The course also exposes students to a number of public policy issues.
ECON 101 3 credits
Principles of Macroeconomics
Prerequisite(s): None
This is a first principles course in the study of economy-wide movements in output, unemployment and inflation. First studied are techniques in measuring these variables. These elements are then combined into basic models of macroeconomic behaviours. The models thus developed enable powerful insights into many otherwise difficult and policy issues of our times. This is a first principles course and presumes no prior study of economics.
ECON 102 3 credits
Twentieth Century Economies
Prerequisite(s): None
This course takes a comparative approach to the study of how different countries deal with the problems of scarcity and choice. The relationships between individuals, interest groups, firms, and the state will be explored. Economic systems are compared within and among three broad categories: market capitalism, central planning, and market socialism. Special attention will be paid to classification of economic systems evaluation criteria, models of economic systems, and coordination of economic activities.
Note: Students with credit for economics courses at the 200 or higher level (excluding Econ 100 [formerly Econ 201], and Econ 101 [formerly Econ 202]) may not take Econ 102 for further credit.
ECON 215 3 credits
Canadian Economic Issues
Prerequisite(s): Econ 100 or Econ 101
This is a post-principles course designed to engage students in a discussion of specific micro/macroeconomics topics including: labour markets, agricultural economics, public finance, industrial strategy, free trade, resource development, competition policy, health, and education.
ECON 307 4 credits
Managerial Economics
Prerequisite(s): Econ 100 and 101, Math 111, or Math 113, or Math 115, all with a C grade or better.
The subject of managerial economics takes many of the principles of microeconomic analysis and applies them to the business context. Emphasis throughout the course will be the application of analytical techniques to “everyday” economic and business problems. The course will concentrate on the theory of consumer demand, demand estimation, the nature of costs and production theory, theories of organization and coordination of firms, and theories of wage determination in factor markets.
ECON 341 4 credits
International Trade
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, and any lower-level economics course or POSC 190
This course, designed for the non-business major, provides a survey of international trade and finance. The international business environment is examined with a survey of cultural, social, and economic factors influencing decision making. Major functions of international commerce are reviewed, including (for example) export and import trade, investment transfers, and international monetary control systems.
ECON 352 4 credits
Technology, Development and Economic Growth
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, and any lower-level Economics, Political Science or LAS course
The accelerating pace of global change continues to challenge existing paradigms of social, political, and economic order. Developments in the technologies of transportation, communications and finance are commonplace examples where technological change has become a harbinger of profound social and economic change. This course provides students with an understanding and historical perspective on the evolution of societies and the impact of technology, development, and economic growth.
ECON 361 4 credits
Environmental and Resources Management
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, and any lower-level Economics course
The conceptual focus of this course is two-fold: on the environment side, the economics of pollution is examined along with theories about various remedies; on the resources side, theories of optimal harvest rates are addressed for both renewable and non-renewable resources. Extraction and preservation values, and common versus private property tenures are examples of economic issues examined in this part of the course.
ECON 365 4 credits
Transportation Economics
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, and any lower-level Economics course
This is an applied course to acquaint students with the economic issues of the transportation sector. The issues and the economics particular to the transportation sector are examined with the general aim of understanding public policies and their effect upon the particular sector and upon the communities served. The approach is to develop the economic principles of demand, cost, pricing, and regulation to the various modes, with an emphasis on those modes of topical interest to the students in the course. Refer to the course syllabus for specific detail.
ECON 388 4 credits
Law and Economics
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, and any lower-level Economics course or Crim 220
The economic analysis of law is an interdisciplinary subject that draws upon several fields of study. This course will help students perceive law in the context of property rights, externalities, and corporate and social behaviour. While the rule of law is generally regarded as the conveyor of justice, this course promises to look beyond to understand the extent to which criminal behaviour can be described as individual, rational choice influenced by the threat of punishment and various socioeconomic factors.
ECON 397 4 credits
Business and Government I -Topics in Microeconomics
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, and either any lower-level Economics course or POSC 110
This is an issues-oriented topics course, designed for students with a minimal background in business and economics. The course is focused on the application of microeconomics to the role of business and to the regulatory role of government in the economy. The course is designed as a practical introduction to such issues as for example, industrial strategy, competition policy, and patent policy. This is not a theory course, and as such, economic theory and analysis is developed in the course only to the extent necessary to understand public policy issues of business and of government regulation and intervention. The aim is to understand the divergent private business and public policy interests with respect to a number of regulatory issues.
ECON 398 4 credits
Business and Government II -Topics in Macroeconomics
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, and any lower-level Economics course
Financial markets and institutions not only affect everyday life but also involve huge flows of funds through the economy, which in turn affect business profits, the production of goods and services, and even the economic well-being of countries. What happens to financial markets, financial institutions, and money is of great concern to our politicians and even can have a major impact on our elections. This course examines how financial markets (such as bonds, stocks and foreign exchange) and financial institutions (banks, insurance companies, mutual funds, and so on) work by exploring the role of money in the economy. This course will also examine the wide variety of instruments for financing, investing and controlling risk that are available in today’s financial markets.
ECON 410 4 credits
Economics of Financial Markets
Prerequisite(s): Econ 100, Econ 101, and at least three credits of upper-level economics
This course examines economic issues related to the financial market system. Topics include financial market functions, theories of savings and investment, structure of interest rates, interest rate forecasting, and macroeconomic models of the financial sector including monetary models and policy.
Education
EDUC 200 3 credits
Educational Psychology
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits of Arts/Science courses
Educational Psychology introduces students to fundamental psychological principles from the areas of learning, memory, human abilities, assessment, and instruction as they pertain to the practice of education. An emphasis is placed on providing students with multiple perspectives of psychological theories, particularly within the area of human development, in order to encourage students to continually evolve their pedagogy.
EDUC 230 3 credits
Library Services for Children
Prerequisite(s): None
Students learn to use a wide variety of children’s literature to provide programs which will help children develop a taste for and a delight in the best materials available.
Note: Students cannot take LIBT 230 for further credit.
EDUC 300 4 credits
Introduction to Best Practices in Teaching and Learning
Prerequisite(s): Educ 200 and 75 credits of Arts/Science courses
Educ 300 provides opportunities for prospective teachers to begin their development as reflective practitioners. Students will be exposed to various educational issues and questions through readings, classroom activities, labs, and interactions with students and practicing teachers. The course will cover different learning styles and instructional methods, curriculum development and design, lesson planning, and assessment. Students will be given time to explore their own values and beliefs about education and teaching. Some travel will be involved since students will observe classes in local schools. These observations may occur outside class time.
EDUC 323 4 credits
History of Education in Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course examines the major trends in historical writing on Canadian education and reviews the key developments in Canada’s educational history from the early 19th century to the present. Themes include the emergence of the public school system in the 19th century, the politics of education before World War One, school experiences for students and teachers, progressive education ideologies, First Nations schooling, the institutional effects of gender and race/ethnicity, and curriculum change over time. An emphasis will be on education history in British Columbia.
This course is also offered as Hist 323. Students cannot take Hist 323 for further credit. Educ 323 will count toward the History major, extended minor or minor requirements.
EDUC 333 4 credits
Schooling and Society
(Soc 333)
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits to include at least six credits of sociology
A sociological analysis of the education system and its relation to major social institutions in Western industrial societies, in particular Canada. Aspects studied may include the classroom, teachers, student culture, bureaucratization, inequality, employment, and social policy.
Note: Students cannot take Soc 333 for further credits.
EDUC 362 3 credits
Philosophy of Education
Prerequisite(s): Phil 110 or forty-five credits of Arts and Applied Arts courses
This course is an introduction to the ethical and philosophical dimensions of education. Topics to be examined concern the aims of education, autonomy, the justification of education, the value of knowledge, the distinction between education and indoctrination, the education of the emotions, the justification of educational authority, equality of educational opportunity, personal relationships in teaching, professional ethics in teaching, and moral education.
Note: Students cannot take Phil 362 for further credit.
EDUC 379 4 credits
Rhetoric: Composition Teaching
Prerequisite(s): Any two second year English courses
This course offers readings and discussion that trace trends in writing curriculum design, theories of writing pedagogy and attitudes towards composition. Workshops teach students to understand assignment design and evaluation as well as curriculum design. This course is of value to prospective teachers.
Note: Student cannot take Engl 379 for further credit.
Education and Career Planning
ECP 064 4 credits
Education and Career Planning Career Explorations
Prerequisite(s): None
Designed to provide employment-readiness skills and the necessary life skills to students who wish to pursue education and/or occupational goals.
ECP 074 4 credits
Education and Career Planning Skills for Success
Prerequisite(s): CCP assessment
This course is designed to develop your skills in learning, communication, and self-management in order to successfully reach your goals in both education and work. This course teaches new and effective learning strategies, communication and conflict resolution skills, and creative career exploration and planning.
Engineering
ENGR 113 4 credits
Engineering Physics — Statics and Dynamics
(formerly Phys 113)
Prerequisite(s): Phys 111, Math 111
This course is specifically designed for students who wish to pursue a career in engineering. The emphasis of this course will be on solving realistic problems. In place of the normal laboratory period, a weekly problem-solving and tutorial period is used to sharpen problem-solving skills. Topics include Newton’s laws, kinematics, statics, and dynamics for particles and systems of particles, static and rotational equilibrium, analysis of structures, planar motion of rigid bodies, energy and momentum conservation.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Engr 113 and Phys 113.
ENGR 122 1 credit
Introduction to Engineering
(formerly Phys 122)
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 111
This course exposes students to a wide range of engineering practices, with a view to helping them identify their interests.
The course meets once a week for between one and four hours. Some weeks there will be a professional engineer coming in to give a presentation of their work. Other weeks the students will visit a site where engineering skills are being applied.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Engr 122 and Phys 122.
ENGR 151 4 credits
Computer-Aided Engineering Graphics
(formerly Phys 151)
Prerequisite(s): Familiarity with Windows-based systems
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 111
This course covers technical sketching, orthographic projection, visualization in three dimensions and conventions of engineering drawing. Microcomputer-based graphics (CADD) will be introduced. The principles of descriptive geometry will be applied to the solution of space problems. This course is designed for students intending to transfer to Engineering at UBC or UVic and emphasizes engineering practices.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Engr 151 and Phys 151.
ENGR 152 4 credits
Linear Algebra for Engineering
Pre- or corequisite(s): Math 112
This course covers the solutions to linear systems of equations, vector spaces, applications to 2D and 3D geometry, linear dependence and independence, matrix algebra, determinants, orthogonal transformations and bases, application to Fourier series, eigenvalues, diagonalization, symmetric matrices, the algebra of complex numbers, the differential equations of vibrational models and linear systems of differential equations. This course is designed for students seeking a career in engineering; students intending on a BSc or BA degree are recommended to take Math 221 instead of Engr/Math 151.
Note: UCFV math degrees require Math 221, not Math 152. Credit cannot be obtained for both Math 152 and Engr 152. This course is cross-linked as Math 152.
ENGR 255 3 credits
Ordinary Differential Equations
Prerequisite(s): Math 112
Pre- or corequisite(s): Math 211 and one of Math 152, Math 221, Phys 221
Most mathematical models of a physical process are in the form of differential equations. This course provides various techniques and ideas in solving ordinary differential equations with an emphasis on applications. Graphing calculators and Maple are used in this course. Topics include first- and second-order linear differential equations, non-linear equations, series solutions, Laplace transform methods, and linear systems.
Note: This course is also offered as Math 255. Students can receive credit for only one of ENGR 255 and Math 255.
ENGR 257 3 credits
Mathematical Physics
Prerequisite(s): (Phys 112, Math 211, Math 310) or (Phys 112, Phys 221, Math 211)
The object of this course is to give students a wide arsenal of mathematical techniques, tools, and tricks to improve their ability in setting up and solving problems from scratch. The solution of partial differential equations with applications to many areas of physics is the biggest single theme of the course. Also included will be special functions, calculus of variations, and integral equations.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for more than one of Math 381, Phys 381, Engr 257.
English
Placement in your first English university-level course (ENGL 105 and above) for students lacking specific course prerequisites depends on your Composition Placement Test (CPT) score. If it is 41–47, take ENGL 081, 091, or 099 as preparation for more advanced English courses. Students whose score is lower than 41 should attend a College and Career Preparation orientation and assessment for placement in ENGL 051, 061, or 071. If your score is between 48 and 67, we strongly recommend that you take ENGL 105 before registering in any course numbered above 105. If your CPT score is higher than 67 and you feel confident that you do not need ENGL 105, you may begin with ENGL 120, 130, 150, or 170. Students whose CPT is below 41 and whose first language is not English should enroll in English as a Second Language training. Students who require English 11 (081) or English 12 (091) as prerequisites to other programs should contact the CCP department.
Students who have an A in English 12 or English Literature 12 do not need to write the CPT in order to register in ENGL 105–170.
Note: An LPI score of 30/40 (Level 5) on the essay section is considered equivalent to a CPT score of 48; a score of 24-26 (Level 4) is equivalent to a CPT score of 41.
For Literature in Translation courses, please see French 350, 360 and Russian 251, 252, 351, 352.
ENGL 051 4 credits
Fundamental English I
Prerequisite(s): Individual CCP assessment and CCP department permission
This course develops beginning reading, sentence writing, spelling, and oral communications. It is a course for adults who wish to develop basic English survival skills. In some classes, students may be assisted by volunteer tutors. This course is not designed for English as a Second Language students.
ENGL 061 4 credits
Fundamental English II
Prerequisite(s): Engl 051 or individual CCP assessment, and CCP department permission
This course develops strategies for reading short stories and articles, paragraph writing, spelling, grammar, vocabulary development, oral communications, and study skills. It is not designed as a course for English as a Second Language students unless they are referred by the ESL department and assessed by CCP department.
ENGL 071 4 credits
Intermediate English
Prerequisite(s): Completion of English 061 with a grade of C or better and CCP department permission, or individual CCP assessment and CCP department permission
This course develops proficiency in reading comprehension, paragraph composition, vocabulary development, sentence variety/grammar, punctuation, spelling, study skills, critical thinking, and interpersonal communication skills. An introduction to essay writing is included. This is not designed as a course for English as a Second Language students.
ENGL 081 4 credits
Advanced English
Prerequisite(s): Engl 071 with a grade of C or better or individual CCP assessment, and CCP department permission
English 081 is a college preparatory course which develops in-depth skills in the writing process, reading/critical thinking, literary analysis, research, grammar, and oral communications. Emphasis is placed on developing essay writing skills. Completion of English 081 with a C+ or better satisfies the prerequisite requirement for English 091 and English 105.
ENGL 091 4 credits
Provincial English
(Pre-College Introduction to Literature and Composition)
Prerequisite(s): CCP ENGL 081 with at least C+ standing, or English 11 with at least C+ standing, or CCP assessment; and CCP department permission
English 091 introduces students to fiction, poetry, and drama at the Grade 12 level, preparing them for the challenges of academic literature courses. Development of essay-writing skills is a major component of this course. This course satisfies the Grade 12 English requirement of the B.C. adult graduation diploma (adult secondary completion). Completion of English 091 with a C+ or better satisfies the prerequisite requirement for English 105.
ENGL 099 3 credits
Pre-College Composition
(formerly Engl 101)
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 12 with a B or better, or CPT score 41 or better
Corequisite(s): None
This is a pre-college composition course designed to prepare students for the writing requirements of college-level courses.
ENGL 105 3 credits
The Reading and Writing of Prose
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in Engl 099 or CMNS 099, or C+ in CCP Engl 081 or 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
A workshop for students who want to improve their ability to read and write non-fiction prose. Selected readings from an essay anthology help introduce the principles and practice of writing clear and effective sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Students who are not fully confident of their essay-writing ability are strongly advised to take this course before they embark on other UCFV courses which require essays.
ENGL 120 3 credits
Introduction to Modern Fiction
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in Engl 099, or C+ in CCP Engl 081 or 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
A study of some of the main themes and techniques in the modern novella, novel, and short story. Students will read these literary forms attentively and discuss them articulately.
ENGL 130 3 credits
Introduction to Modern Drama
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in Engl 099, or C+ in CCP Engl 081 or 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
An introduction to dramatic literature, focusing chiefly on 20th century plays. A variety of forms of drama are read, seen where possible, and discussed.
ENGL 150 3 credits
Introduction to Modern Poetry
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in Engl 099, or C+ in CCP Engl 081 or 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
An introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques of poetry, focusing on the works of 20th century poetry. Students are encouraged to read poetry sensitively, to listen appreciatively to the poetic voice, and to write about the works analytically.
ENGL 170 3 credits
Literature in Context
(formerly Engl 110)
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in Engl 099, or C+ in CCP Engl 081 or Engl 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
This course centres on specific themes or cultural fields of study that will vary with the instructor. Areas of interest may include the diasporic literatures; aboriginal cultures; gay, lesbian, and bisexual writings; and period or theme-based studies. The course will feature literary texts drawn from various genres, which may include historical narratives and documents, films, videos, or visual art displays.
ENGL 201 3 credits
English Literature, 14th-17th Century Major Authors: Chaucer to Milton
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher
An introduction to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Shakespearean drama, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and to other 15th to 17th century verse and prose. Essays and an examination are required.
Your appreciation of English literature will be enhanced by studying History 109 either previously to, or concurrently with, English 201.
ENGL 202 3 credits
English Literature, 18th-20th Century Major Authors:Pope to Yeats
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher
Students will study 18th century writers such as Pope, Swift, Johnson and the early novelists; the rebellion against reason led by Blake and the Romantic poets; Victorians such as George Eliot and Dickens; and the literary innovators of the 20th century such as Woolf, Shaw, Yeats and Joyce. Your appreciation of English literature will be enhanced by studying History 110 either previously to, or concurrently with, English 202.
ENGL 209 3 credits
The Structure of the English Language
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100 level English courses (English 105 or higher)
This course will introduce students to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern English. While the course will focus on a descriptive approach to linguistic analysis, students will also examine issues of meaning and usage, with particular reference to Canadian English.
ENGL 210 3 credits
Advanced Composition
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher; or CMNS 125 and 250; or CMNS 155 and 250;
This is a course in advanced composition. Students will analyze aspects of academic discourse, identify features and contexts characteristic of academic discourse, and work to improve their own writing skills.
ENGL 211 3 credits
Creative Writing: Play-Writing
Prerequisite(s): Engl 105 and any first year literature course, Engl 120 or higher
This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of play-writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established playwrights are studied as models. Students produce their own dramatic writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom discussion.
ENGL 212 3 credits
Creative Writing: Fiction
Prerequisite(s): Engl 105 and any first year literature course, Engl 120 or higher
This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of short fiction writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established writers are studied as models. Students produce their own writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom discussion.
ENGL 213 3 credits
Creative Writing: Poetry
Prerequisite(s): Engl 105 and any first-year literature course, Engl 120 or higher
This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of poetry writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established writers are studied as models. Students produce their own writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom. discussion.
ENGL 214 3 credits
Reading, Writing, and Rhetoric
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher
An introduction to the theories of rhetoric, composition, and reading. This theory course requires written essays and exams, and is offered for university-transfer credit.
ENGL 215 3 credits
Creative Writing: Creative Non-fiction
Prerequisite(s): English 105 and any first-year literature course 120 or higher
Creative Non-fiction is a relatively new genre that is gaining critical attention. The course explores this genre’s range and potential. Working with the personal essay as transformed by fictional elements and poetic technique, students will discover Creative Non-fiction’s special capacity to explore and illuminate their worlds — through their own travel, memoir and biographical writings, and by studying the works of skilled practitioners.
ENGL 220 3 credits
Development of the British Novel
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher
A study of the social and literary developments which made the novel possible, and the robust and varied works of the early novelists — Defoe, Richardson, Fielding — and their successors. Engl 220 is occasionally offered in England.
ENGL 225 3 credits
Classical Literature in Translation
(formerly Engl 265)
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher, or instructor’s permission
This course studies some of the most influential literature written in Greek and/or Latin from the period of Homer to the period of Virgil and Ovid.
ENGL 226 3 credits
Renaissance Literature in Translation
(formerly Engl 266)
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher, or instructor’s permission
This course studies some of the most influential literature written in Europe from the period of Dante and Petrarch to the period of Cervantes and Moliere.
ENGL 227 3 credits
European Literature in Translation, 1750-1940
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher, or instructor’s permission
This course surveys literary developments in Europe between the 18th and 20th centuries, enabling students to compare English with other national literatures. The readings clarify the nature of continental influences on English authors and literary movements.
ENGL 230 3 credits
History of British Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher
A companion course to Engl 220. While some attention is paid to the roots of Western drama in Ancient Greece and Renaissance Europe, the course focuses on the social, theatrical, and literary conventions of English drama from the medieval to the modern period. Lectures, seminars, readings, and appropriate theatre visits are part of the course. Engl 230 is occasionally offered in Ashland, Oregon.
ENGL 240 3 credits
An Introduction to Canadian Literature
(formerly Engl 140)
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher, or instructor’s permission
An introduction to influential figures and themes in Canadian literature. Students read the texts closely, discuss them articulately in the classroom, and identify major themes and styles. Essays and an examination are required for university- transfer credit.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Engl 140 and Engl 240.
ENGL 245 3 credits
Indian Literature in English
Prerequisite(s): Any two first-year English courses
This course examines Indian literature written in English in its social and historical contexts. The course focuses primarily on fiction by Indo-Canadian authors, but course materials may include influential works by other Indian writers and works in other genres (e.g., autobiographies, essays, film).
ENGL 250 3 credits
The Bible as Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — ENGL 105 or higher, or instructor’s permission
A study of the principal literary forms found in the 1611 King James Bible, with emphasis on biblical narrative, poetry, comedy, romance and epic, and the centrality of the Bible to English literacy history.
ENGL 270 3 credits
Popular Fiction
(formerly Engl 260)
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses — Engl 105 or higher
This course offers a study of one of the genres popularized in the 19th and 20th centuries, such as detective fiction, horror, or historical romance.
ENGL 280 3 credits
Survey of Children’s Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two first-year courses numbered 105 or higher
This course introduces students to the major streams of literature written in English for children from the 17th century through the “Golden Age” of children’s literature in the Victorian period and the early part of the 20th century. The course will focus on major authors in classical children’s literature and on the images of childhood presented in these works over time.
ENGL 301 4 credits
Homer, Classicism, and English Literary History
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course is specifically designed to introduce students of English literature to the influence of Homer and other classical authors on the development of the English literary tradition.
ENGL 304 4 credits
Topics in Medieval literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will introduce students to the non-Chaucerian literature of the 14th and 15th centuries in England. Topics are based on individual themes, genres, or authors.
ENGL 306 4 credits
Chaucer
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
The poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer will be studied.
ENGL 309 4 credits
Topics in Renaissance Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course introduces students to writers and literature of the 16th and 17th centuries (excluding Shakespeare and Milton).
ENGL 310 4 credits
Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will survey Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama, excluding Shakespeare’s plays.
ENGL 312 4 credits
Shakespeare
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course examines a representative sample of Shakespeare’s plays selected from the “genres” of the works as they have been traditionally divided.
ENGL 316 4 credits
Milton
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
The poetry and prose of John Milton will be examined.
ENGL 318 4 credits
Major Authors of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century: Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will study Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson as well as some of their contemporaries.
ENGL 323 4 credits
Special Topics in Romanticism
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course approaches the English Romantic period from a variety of perspectives that will vary with the instructor. Studies might, for example, focus on Blake and Archetypal Psychology, or Works by and Attitudes Toward Women, or The Politics of English Romanticism.
ENGL 325 4 credits
British Literature, 1780-1830
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
A survey of literature published in England during the Romantic period, with emphasis on the poetry and poetics of Romanticism. Representative novels, essays, and other genres will also be studied.
ENGL 333 4 credits
Nineteenth Century British Novelists
(formerly Engl 332 and Engl 334)
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will explore novels written by such major authors as Austen, Scott, Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Trollope, the Brontks, George, Eliot, Hardy, Gissing, and George Moore.
ENGL 335 4 credits
Topics in Victorian Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
Topics in Victorian literature will be drawn from the rich offerings in Victorian poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and art.
ENGL 336 4 credits
British Fiction 1880-1920
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
Some of the major British novelists — Thomas Hardy, George Gissing, E.M. Forster, Joseph Conrad, Ford Maddox Ford, D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce — will be studied.
ENGL 338 4 credits
Studies in Modernism
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
Works by writers such as Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Kafka, Joyce, Beckett, and David Jones will be studied.
ENGL 344 4 credits
American Prose and Poetry, Beginnings to the Civil War
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course is a survey of American authors and literary/national themes from the Colonial era to the eve of the Civil War.
ENGL 348 4 credits
American Literature 1865-1910
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course offers a survey of major literary figures and movements from the Civil War to the eve of World War I. This course will pay particular attention to the rapid development of prose fiction under the influence of literary theories of realism and naturalism, and will demonstrate the contemporary “shock of the new” as registered in poetry, prose, and drama.
ENGL 349 4 credits
Topics in American Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
Special topics in American literature can include the influence of Puritan theology on American literature, the American Renaissance, naturalism and realism in American literature, and American modernism.
ENGL 350 4 credits
Survey of American Literature, 1914-1945
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course surveys the heralded American authors of the “Modern” period, including Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulker, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens.
ENGL 352 4 credits
American Writers of World War II and Later
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course is a survey of the key authors and trends in modern and contemporary American writing since World War II.
ENGL 354 4 credits
Canadian Poetry and Prose, Beginnings to 1920
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will deal with some of the major texts written in or about Canada from the 17th century to the beginning of the 20th century.
ENGL 356 4 credits
Canadian Prose of the Twentieth Century
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will examine representative Canadian fiction of the 20th century.
ENGL 358 4 credits
Modern Canadian Poetry
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course focuses on the developments in Canadian poetry from 1920 to the present.
ENGL 360 4 credits
Topics in Canadian Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will focus on significant Canadian texts organized round a particular topic such as women in poetry, Canadian drama, or multiculturalism.
ENGL 361 4 credits
Canadian Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
A literary study of drama as it has developed in Canada, with emphasis on contemporary plays, and on the richness of diversity in form and content. In addition to the reading, students are required to see and review live performances.
ENGL 362 4 credits
Literature of British Columbia
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course surveys the literature of British Columbia, from its beginnings through to contemporary times. The course covers “national” groups, paying attention to both rural and urban settings. The course includes poetry, fiction, and drama.
ENGL 364 4 credits
History and Principles of Literary Criticism
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course explores a selection of major critical statements about literature, ranging from the Greek classics to renaissance, romantic, and early modern constructions of the literary text. Topics may include the social and aesthetic function of literature as it has been variously conceived, the formal or philosophical parameters of the major genres, or the politics of the criticism itself.
ENGL 366 4 credits
Studies in Critical Approaches to Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course surveys seminal texts in post-war and contemporary literary theory. Areas of concentration may include poststructuralism, psychoanalytic criticism, or Marxism. Students will apply one or two of these critical approaches to a sampling of literary works. Areas of concentration and course content will vary with the instructor.
ENGL 368 4 credits
Special Topics in Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course is a literary study of selected dramatic works. It is organized around various forms, issues, regions, or critical approaches — as, for example, Theatre of Protest, or Theatre of the Absurd.
ENGL 370 4 credits
The History of the English Language
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
The course explores the evolution of the English language from its origins in the West Germanic dialects established in England in the seventh century to its present position as an international medium for commerce and technology. Students will examine the linguistic, historical, and social factors that have influenced the language’s development. Special attention will be paid to the rise of diverse national and regional variations of English.
ENGL 371 4 credits
Advanced Composition: Theory and Practice
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course allows you to examine theories of rhetoric and composition, and to test those theories through your own writing and through observing and helping other students in their composing process.
ENGL 372 4 credits
Canadian English
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses. Linguistics 101 is recommended
This course explores the history and structure of English as spoken and written in Canada. In addition to examining the roots of Canadian English in both the British and North American contexts, students will compare the historical and contemporary dialects of the Canadian regions to explore the impact of history, geography, and ideology on the language as used. Readings will be drawn from a range of literary and non-literary sources. The course will begin with a brief introduction to the basic principles of linguistic analysis.
ENGL 374 4 credits
Rhetoric: Advanced Composition
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course helps already strong writers further develop competence and flexibility in writing. Practical exercises and discussion cover features of writing for general, academic, and professional readers. The workshop classroom provides hands-on experience in drafting, evaluation, and revision.
ENGL 375 4 credits
Rhetoric: Composition Theory
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course introduces students to the field of composition as it emerges from within university English departments in the 1960s. The readings and discussion will focus on ideas which have shaped the ways composition is both thought of and taught.
ENGL 376 4 credits
Rhetoric: An Historical Survey
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course introduces students to definitions and roles of rhetoric through the centuries. Readings and discussion in this survey will point to the long-standing connections among language, persuasion and education. The readings cover major periods of rhetoric: Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Twentieth Century.
ENGL 379 4 credits
Rhetoric: Composition Teaching
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course offers readings and discussion that traces trends in writing curriculum design, theories of writing pedagogy, and attitudes towards composition. Workshops teach students to understand assignment design and evaluation as well as curriculum design. This course is of value to prospective teachers.
Note: Students with Engl 379 cannot take Educ 379 for further credit.
ENGL 490 4 credits
Directed Studies in English
Prerequisite(s): Permission to enter requires 45 credits in English and written contract between student and instructor, signed by student, instructor and department head
This independent study course is designed for upper-level students who wish to pursue in-depth study of an author, genre, period, or topic not otherwise offered.
ENGL 491 4 credits
Honours Directed Reading
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Honours program as outlined in the calendar; completion of all lower-level course requirements for the English major, and a minimum of 24 upper-level requirements for major, and permission of an instructor and as outlined by the department
Honours Directed Reading is the first of two courses specific to the Honours program: A reading course, and a course devoted to the writing of an extended research essay. Honours Directed Reading is therefore intended to prepare students to write the research paper. The course will consist of instruction in research techniques and intensive reading in an area of interest to be defined by agreement between students and instructors.
ENGL 492 4 credits
Honours Directed Essay
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Honours program as outlined in the calendar; completion of all lower-level course requirements for the English major, and a minimum of 24 upper-level requirements for major, and permission of an instructor and as outlined by the department
Honours Directed Essay is the second of two courses specific to the Honours program. Preceded by Honours Directed Reading, the Honours Essay course will be devoted to the writing of an extended research paper. This essay is to be the graduating project for the student’s BA Honours degree in English, and should display excellent writing ability, knowledge of scholarly conventions, and thorough familiarity with the student’s chosen topic.
English as a Second Language
Note: ESL volunteer tutors — If you are interested in becoming an ESL volunteer tutor or receiving the services of one, see the College and Career Prep section on page 99.
Skill-based courses (core):
Writing/Grammar sequence:
ESL WG34 6 credits
ESL Writing and Grammar Pre-Intermediate
Prerequisite(s): Placement by ESL assessment
ESL WG34 is intended for students who are at the beginning of their second language learning. This course is designed to round out students’ skills at survival written English and prepare them for the academically oriented intermediate ESL writing and grammar classes. It teaches the basic English grammar used in writing correct simple sentences. Some reading, vocabulary study, and speaking/listening may be involved.
ESL WG44 6 credits
ESL Writing and Grammar Intermediate I
Prerequisite(s): ESL I39, WG34, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL WG44 is intended for students who are ready to begin working on the more academically oriented intermediate skills needed for writing. It is designed to give students a good grasp of the simple sentence and the simple paragraph. Some reading, vocabulary study, and speaking/listening may be involved.
ESL WG54 6 credits
ESL Writing and Grammar Intermediate II
Prerequisite(s): ESL WG44, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL WG54 is designed to give intermediate students near mastery of the simple sentence and to provide them with a good grasp of complex/compound sentences and a variety of basic paragraph types. Some reading, vocabulary study, and speaking/listening may be involved.
ESL WG64 6 credits
ESL Writing and Grammar Advanced I
Prerequisite(s): WG54 or placement by ESL assessment
ESL WG64 reviews basic paragraph structure and teaches students how to incorporate that structure in a variety of paragraph development types that are standard in English. Students will be introduced to multi-paragraph (essay) writing by the end of the course. Throughout the course, the emphasis will be on clear and effective written communication in English. Grammar, sentence structure, style, and logical development will be studied in relation to this emphasis.
ESL WG74 6 credits
ESL Writing and Grammar Advanced II
Prerequisite(s): WG64 or placement by ESL assessment
ESL WG74 develops skills for academic writing. The course focuses on five common writing tasks using a variety of rhetorical modes. In particular, students will develop academic writing abilities in the areas of defining, instructing, explaining, evaluating, summarizing, and responding. The course is conducted as a writer’s workshop encompassing researching topics, organizing information, outlining, peer-editing, revising, and publishing. Grammar is integrated and manipulated for essay clarity and cohesion.
ESL WG84 6 credits
ESL Writing and Grammar Writing Bridge
Prerequisite(s): WG74 or placement by ESL assessment
ESL WG84 provides students with a range of strategies to prepare them for academic writing assignments in their undergraduate college and university courses. In addition to an emphasis on analysis and production of correct grammar, sentence structure, and punctuation, the course provides students with an opportunity to respond to the course writing assignments using a variety of writing strategies and grammatical structures.
Reading/Vocabulary sequence
ESL RV38 6 credits
ESL Reading and Vocabulary Pre-intermediate
(formerly ESL R30 & ESL V33)
Prerequisite(s): Placement by ESL assessment
ESL RV38 is designed for pre-intermediate students who want to improve their reading and vocabulary skills for academic, personal, and/or career purposes. This skills course will allow students to learn and practice the skills and vocabulary necessary for increasing their reading comprehension and speed.
ESL RV48 6 credits
ESL Reading and Vocabulary Intermediate I
(formerly ESL R40 & ESL V43)
Prerequisite(s): ESL I39, or ESL R30 & ESL V33, or ESL RV38, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL RV48 is designed for low-intermediate students who want to strengthen their reading and vocabulary skills for academic, personal, and/or career purposes. This skills course will allow students to learn and practice the skills necessary to improve their reading comprehension and their reading speed.
ESL RV58 6 credits
ESL Reading and Vocabulary Intermediate II
(formerly ESL R50 & ESL V53)
Prerequisite(s): ESL R40 & ESL V43, or RV48, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL RV58 is designed for high-intermediate students who wish to continue to strengthen their reading and vocabulary skills for academic, personal, and/or career purposes. This skills course will expose students to different types of readings and give students the skills they need to enable them to become independent learners.
ESL RV68 6 credits
ESL Reading and Vocabulary Advanced I
(formerly ESL R60 & ESL V63)
Prerequisite(s): RV58, or R50 & V53, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL RV68 is designed for advanced students who wish to continue to strengthen their reading and vocabulary skills for academic, personal, or career purposes. This course builds on reading skills with an emphasis on summarizing, outlining , and taking notes from a range of fictional and infictional material. Students are also introduced to literature through unabridged novels and to interpretive reading. Students can also expect to increase their vocabulary by at least 300 word and 50 idiomatic expressions.
ESL R70 3 credits
ESL Reading Advanced II
Prerequisite(s): RV68, or R60 & V63, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL R70 is designed for high-advanced students who wish to continue to strengthen their reading skills for academic or career purposes. Students will be exposed to a variety of academic reading selections of varying lengths. In addition to consolidating the more literal skills, students will be challenged to develop their skill in critical reading, analysis, note-taking, and summarizing. Reading speed and comprehension will be developed through specific drills and reading self-selected novels.
ESL R80 3 credits
ESL Reading Bridge I
Prerequisite(s): R70 and V73, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL R80 is designed for very advanced students who wish to gain the reading skills necessary to be successful in their academic studies. It will prepare students for the reading that is required in university and college courses. Students will strengthen their study/reading skills: note-taking, summarizing, outlining, paraphrasing, understanding and restating logical structure, integrating ideas from multiple sources, and varying reading speed according to purpose.
ESL V73 3 credits
ESL Vocabulary Advanced II
Prerequisite(s): RV68, or V63, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL V73 is designed for students who already have a good reading vocabulary and a basic knowledge of common idioms. The students will strengthen their vocabulary by learning at least 300 words and 50 idioms. Students will also be made sensitive to levels of formality and become familiar with many word parts which will help the student become more efficient as an independent learner.
ESL V83 3 credits
ESL Vocabulary Bridge I
Prerequisite(s): V73, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL V83 is intended for students with academic aspirations and a strong vocabulary base. It familiarizes students with the vocabulary that they can expect to encounter in university and college courses. It also includes studies in independent vocabulary development.
Speaking/Listening sequence:
ESL S36 3 credits
ESL Listening/Speaking Pre-Intermediate
Prerequisite(s): Placement by ESL assessment
ESL S36 is intended for students at the pre-intermediate level. It is designed to provide students with the basic grammar and vocabulary they need to become more confident speakers and listeners in social situations. Though reading and writing skills will be used, the primary focus is on listening, speaking, and pronunciation.
ESL S46 3 credits
ESL Listening/Speaking Intermediate I
Prerequisite(s): ESL S36, or I 39, or placement by the ESL assessment
ESL S46 is intended for students at the low-intermediate level. It is designed to build on the listening and speaking skills necessary for social interactions and to expand these skills for more challenging academic or career tasks. Though some reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary will be involved, the primary focus is on listening, speaking and pronunciation.
ESL S56 3 credits
ESL Listening/Speaking Intermediate II
Prerequisite(s): ESL S46 or placement by ESL assessment
ESL S56 is intended for students at the intermediate level. It is designed to prepare students for more complex academic speaking and listening tasks, and help them toward greater fluency and competence in the use of English. Though some reading, writing, grammar, and vocabulary study may be involved, the primary focus is on listening, speaking, and pronunciation.
ESL S66 3 credits
ESL Listening/Speaking Advanced
Prerequisite(s): ESL S56 and or placement by ESL assessment
ESL S66 is intended for advanced students. Students will be taught social interaction functions such as making introductions, giving and following instructions, persuasion, conversation management strategies, offering suggestions, and debating. Pronunciation emphasis may include stress, intonation, reductions, and contractions. Listening activities may involve identifying a speaker’s attitude, mood, and level of formality as well as content. In addition, students will be taught note-taking skills for a variety of lecture situations.
ESL S76 3 credits
ESL Listening/Speaking Advanced II
Prerequisite(s): ESL S66 or placement by ESL assessment
ESL S76 is intended for advanced students who wish to take university or college courses. Students will be taught functions such as managing a discussion/debate in a small formal group, giving clear detailed instructions on how to perform a complex task, and presenting a persuasive proposal. They may also discuss information and opinions with individuals in order to coordinate teamwork for accomplishing assignments and tasks. Pronunciation emphasis may shift towards the needs of each specific class, with the aim of developing near-native speech production. Listening tasks may include demonstrating critical comprehension of a lecture given by one speaker, or of an extended oral exchange between several speakers.
ESL L87 3 credits
ESL Listening Bridge I
Prerequisite(s): S76, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL L87 is intended for students with academic aspirations and good oral skills. The course will expose students to a variety of academic listening situations, taped and live, and develop students’ abilities to understand complex language at full speed. The course will also cultivate note-taking skills.
Electives
ESL BU55 3 credits
Intermediate Business English
Prerequisite(s): A grade of C- or better in ESL WG44, ESL R40, ESL V43, and ESL S46; or ESL assessment of 50 level or above in all skill areas
This course focuses on basic communication in a business environment. ESL students will be introduced to a wide variety of written and oral communication tasks, including writing short business letters, faxes, memos, and emails. Case studies and role playing will teach students how to act and speak in various business situations. By the end of the course, ESL students will have improved their English skills and will have gained a basic understanding of North American-style business correspondence and face-to-face communication.
ESL BU75 3 credits
Pre-University Business English for ESL
Prerequisite(s): ESL WG54, RV58 (or R50 & V53), and S56
This course is designed to help prepare ESL students for Business Administration & Computer Information Systems programs. In addition, it should be very useful for currently employed ESL students or those aiming to work in a business environment.
ESL C54 3 credits
Canadian Culture & Communication
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is for all new international students in their first semester. It is designed to orient students to Canadian culture and the Canadian educational milieu, to encourage intercultural communication, and to support cultural adjustment. If space is available, other students may also register.
ESL CB50 3 credits
Basic Computer Concepts and Use
Prerequisite(s): ESL RV48 (or ESL R40), and ESL S46
A basic introduction to computer use, terminology and concepts, including keyboarding, Windows, word processing, the Internet, and e-mail for ESL students who have little or no experience with computers and weak English skills. This course is designed for intermediate to advanced ESL students who need computer basics for further training in ESL on-line or ESL courses which incorporate a high degree of computer-aided instruction.
ESL CB60 3 credits
Computers for Business
Prerequisite(s): ESL CB50 or instructor permission
This course focuses on using computers in a business environment. Students will be introduced to a wide range of computer applications including spreadsheet programs, database management, graphics for business presentations, word processing for professional business documents, and internet and e-mail communication. By the end of the course, students will have a good basic understanding of how computers are being used in the world of business today.
ESL CB77 3 credits
Computer Concepts English
Prerequisite(s): ESL CB60 or instructor permission
The course focuses on language, terminology, and concepts needed to continue studies in Computer Information Systems. Using a textbook and numerous hands-on computer exercises, ESL students will develop a basic understanding of computer hardware, software for systems and applications, components of the system unit, and storage devices, as well as operating systems and utility programs.
ESL CMS 3 credits
Computer-Mediated Multiskill Course
Prerequisite(s): None
Students will study each of the skill areas of speaking, grammar, vocabulary, reading, and writing. Instruction will be through the use of computer software, internet resources, and interactive web-based activities.
ESL CWE30 3 credits
Computer Word Exploration I
Prerequisite(s): ESL placement test showing that a student has a basic grasp of the English alphabet, phonics and sentence structure
Students will study the spelling, phonics, grammatical class, and meaning of 400 one syllable English words through the use of computer generated software, computer generated activities, and speaking and writing reinforcement activities.
ESL CWE40 3 credits
Computer Word Exploration II
Prerequisite(s): One of ESL CWE30, S36, RV38 or WG34 or placement by ESL assessment
Students will study the spelling, phonics, grammatical class, and meaning of 400 one to three-syllable English words through the use of computer software, computer-generated activities, and speaking and writing reinforcement activities.
ESL DR47 3 credits
ESL Through Drama
Prerequisite(s): None
This course focuses on using drama to practise speaking in English. Students will be introduced to a wide range of drama-related activities intended to improve their speaking and presentation skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to speak and present themselves in a wide variety of culturally appropriate ways.
ESL FLM 3 credits
ESL Through Film
Prerequisite(s): ESL R40 and ESL S46
Students practice and develop reading, writing, grammar, listening and speaking English through the interesting medium of film.
ESL MSC 3 credits
Multiskill Class for ESL Students
Prerequisite(s): None
Students will study each of the skill areas of speaking, grammar, vocabulary, reading, and writing. This is a section of ongoing, self-paced instruction and is intended for local students who have insufficient time and little necessity to take academic day courses.
ESL MU47 3 credits
ESL Through Music
Prerequisite(s): None
This course focuses on using music to improve vocabulary, speaking, listening, and pronunciation skills in English. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of musical activities as a way of expanding their English abilities.
ESL P45 3 credits
ESL Pronunciation I
Prerequisite(s): ESL WG34, RV38 (or R30 and V33), and S36 or higher, or placement by ESL assessment
ESL P45 is intended for intermediate to advanced ESL students who would like to improve their listening and speaking skills. It teaches sounds as part of the rhythm and stress used in informal English and focuses on difficult sounds from a variety of perspectives.
ESL P55 3 credits
ESL Phonics/Spelling
Prerequisite(s): ESL WG44, RV48 (or R40 AND V43), AND S46
This course is intended for Intermediate/Advanced ESL students who still find it difficult to understand the relationship between the English spelling and sound systems. The course will survey the English sounds represented by a given spelling as well as all the possible spellings for a given sound. It will also deal with word and phrase stress, rhythm, intonation, and reductions in rapid speech as well as use of dictionary pronunciation keys.
ESL P65 3 credits
ESL Pronunciation II
Prerequisite(s): ESL P45 or all of WG44, RV48 and S46
This course is intended for intermediate to advanced ESL students who would like to improve their listening and speaking skills by studying rhythm, stress, and intonation. It concentrates on emphasising parts of each sentence which are essential for clear communication. It includes techniques for improving listening comprehension and giving oral presentations.
ESL T09 0 credits
ESL Pre-Beginner
Prerequisite(s): None
For students who cannot attend regular classes.
ESL T85 3 credits
ESL TOEFL Preparation Bridge I
Prerequisite(s): ESL WG74, R70, V73 and S76, or instructor’s permission
ESL T85 is intended for students with academic aspirations and who wish or need to take the TOEFL test. The course is intended to help these students master the English grammar and writing skills they will need on the test.
Family Child Care
FAM 01 1.5 credits
Introduction to Family Child Care
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students with an overview of the whole family child care program, including goals and content. It introduces the students (potential and existing child care providers, parents, and those considering a career change) to the mechanics of operating a home-based family child care business.
FAM 02 1.5 credits
Understanding Child Development
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students with an overview of the development of the individual from conception through adolescence. Particular attention is paid to the psychological, emotional, physical, moral and intellectual development from birth to age twelve. This course will look at each of these areas from different theorists’ perspectives with application to the family child care setting.
FAM 03 1.5 credits
Understanding Children’s Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will focus on the guidance and nurturing of young children based on an understanding of their behaviour. Family child care providers will have the opportunity to achieve competency in the development of strategies for interpersonal communication, child management and the fostering of positive, emotional and social development of young children. Students will explore effective ways in dealing with negative behaviour while developing strategies to encourage positive behaviour as well as preserving and encouraging children’s self-esteem.
FAM 04 1.5 credits
Health, Safety, and Nutrition
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will familiarize participants with the health, safety and nutritional needs of young children. It will emphasize how family child care providers can offer a safe home environment that is consistent with the healthy growth and development of children.
FAM 05 1.5 credits
Planning Children’s Experiences
Prerequisite(s): None
This course offers family child care providers practical knowledge in planning activities in terms of materials, space requirements, and time management. The focus will be on play-based activities that promote developmentally appropriate learning to meet children’s needs on an individual basis.
FAM 06 1.5 credits
Administration/Working with Families
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will emphasize the importance of seeing family child care in a professional manner — as a business and a career. The course will cover the administrative procedures necessary for licensing, tax planning, parent/care giver contracts, record-keeping, household management, networking and the operation of a business including liability insurance.
Fashion Design
Most of the seats in these courses are reserved for students in the Fashion Design program. Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space.
FD 113 3 credits
Fashion Drawing I
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the basic anatomy of the human body is an essential foundation to fashion drawing. Students will gain understanding of the structure, balance, and movement of the female form and how it is incorporated into fashion images. Emphasis is placed on visual awareness and its relationship to perspective and proportion. Students will be introduced to a variety of techniques which constitute fashion illustration and technical drawing of garments for the apparel industry.
Students will develop drawing skills using a variety of media and improve their powers of observation. Live models will be introduced at appropriate times.
FD 114 3 credits
Fashion Drawing II
Prerequisite(s): FD 113
While further developing students’ ability to draw the fashion figure, this course will cover the use of colour and mixed media to render the total fashion image. Composition and graphic layout techniques are explored. In addition to drawing for ladies, men’s and children’s proportions are explored.
FD 163 3 credits
Fashion Design I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Fashion Design program
Corequisite(s): FD 181 and FD 191
Students will learn how to apply the basic fine art principles and elements of design to garments which meet the needs of today’s markets. The fashion industry is examined in relation to its many facets, with emphasis placed on exploring the roles and functions held by designers and technicians. Promotion, sales techniques, and marketing are a practical component of the course and demonstrated through seminar presentations. Volume designing of skirt and pants for the contemporary market is covered in detail.
FD 164 3 credits
Fashion Design II
Prerequisite(s): FD 163
Corequisite(s): FD 182 and FD 192
Students enrolled in this course will continue to work with design elements and principles. Emphasis will be placed on the influence and roles colour and texture play throughout apparel design. Marketing is introduced through the exploration and development of oral presentations and visual promotional materials.
FD 171 3 credits
Textiles
Prerequisite(s): None
Textile science is the study of the structure, characteristics, and performance of fabrics. Understanding textile composition and production provides the knowledge needed to make informed decisions regarding fabric suitability and performance limitations.
This course provides a broad overview of the composition, production, and utilization of fabrics. Topics include the examination of natural and synthetic fibres, manufacturing of yarns, and the processes of structuring yarns into fabrics. Knowledge will be gained in relation to dyestuffs, printing, and fabric finishes. Fibre content, care, and labelling laws are covered in detail.
FD 172 4 credits
Machine Knitting
Prerequisite(s): None
Students gain an understanding of the versatility of knit fabrics in the marketplace and gain awareness of how knitted fabrics are produced. Hands-on experience with the domestic knitting machine allows for experimentation with patterns, textures, colours, and yarns to produce fashion fabrics suitable for the current market. Creativity of design is emphasized. A child’s sweater and one outfit will be taken to completion. Basic pattern drafting for knitwear on the computer is covered.
FD 174 4 credits
Weaving Fashion Fabrics
Prerequisite(s): FD 171 or instructor’s permission
This course will allow students to develop a basic understanding of threading and weaving techniques on a four-shaft loom. Students will create a resource book of mounted samples through experimenting with a variety of structures and fibres. A length of fashion fabric (or shawl) will be researched, designed, drafted, and woven. Computer-aided design and weaving programs will be introduced.
FD 181 3 credits
Garment Construction I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Fashion Design program
Corequisite(s): FD 163 and FD 191
An introduction to industrial garment assembly practices. Through a combination of lecture and lab sessions, students will learn and understand how various construction techniques are performed and used in the production of well-made garments. Students will learn how to safely and efficiently operate industrial equipment and become exposed to sequencing methods, planning efficient work-flow and materials handling. Some will compile a resource book of construction samples for future reference. Knowledge and skills acquired will be applied through the construction of a garment bag, and designed skirt and pant.
FD 182 3 credits
Garment Construction II
Prerequisite(s): FD 181
Corequisite(s): FD 164 and FD 192
Students enrolled in this course will learn and understand how various construction techniques are performed and used in the production of well-made garments. Quality assessment methods will be explored through the establishment of relevant criteria in relation to garment type, performance expectations, and cost. This is a continuation of FD 181, involving more complex construction applications and projects involving special fabrics and embellishment details. A shirt, dress, and child’s outfit will be constructed in full size. Students will develop a resource book of related construction samples, for future reference.
FD 191 3 credits
Pattern Drafting I
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Fashion Design program
Corequisite(s): FD 163 and FD 181
Students enrolled in this course will learn and understand how to develop basic skirt and pant pattern drafts and manipulate these drafts to create various design styles using flat pattern techniques. Standard and personal measurements will be used. To reinforce the importance of proper garment “fit”, alterations and pattern adjustments will be examined and practised. Pattern development in relation to design features, fabric characteristics, and construction methods will be a major focus. Students will develop exercises in full and half scale. Students will be required to work in partnership with others for components of class activities or projects.
FD 192 3 credits
Pattern Drafting II
Prerequisite(s): FD 191
Corequisite(s): FD 164 and FD 182
Students enrolled in this course will learn and understand how to draft patterns for shirts, sleeves, collars, and dresses using standard and personal measurements. Pattern alterations and fitting techniques will be analyzed to develop custom-fitting garments. Children’s pattern blocks will be manipulated to review pattern-making techniques and to develop styled patterns. Students will develop a resource book of pattern drafts and manipulations in half and full scale.
FD 193 3 credits
History of Fashion
Prerequisite(s): None
Today’s fashion industry continues to be influenced by history. This introductory course is designed to provide an historical framework, define concepts, and present basic knowledge essential to understanding the present fashion industry. The development of fashion from ancient to modern times is examined, with emphasis placed on 20th century fashions and the current Canadian fashion industry.
FD 263 3 credits
Apparel Design and Illustration I
Prerequisite(s): FD 114 and FD 164 or instructor’s permission
Corequisite(s): FD 281 and FD 283
Students enrolled in this course will learn how to use established fashion art techniques to design, develop, and communicate ideas towards both the manufacturing and marketing sectors of the apparel industry. Students will learn how to develop manufacturer’s lines and examine inspiration sources, fabric selection, design groupings, and customer expectations. Projects covered will include suits for a select market, lingerie, and swimwear.
FD 264 3 credits
Apparel Design and Illustration II
Prerequisite(s): FD 263
Corequisite(s): FD 282 and FD 284
A continuation of FD 263, with emphasis on market research and the preparation of a portfolio of design inspirations, ideas, illustrations, and photographs to be used at employment interviews. Students will design apparel which meets the functional needs of specific markets and develop a manufacturer’s “line” of apparel for the market of their choice. Concept boards, illustrations, and technical drawings are integral components.
FD 265 3 credits
Computer Applications for Apparel
Prerequisite(s): FD 263, FD 281, and FD 283
This course focuses on the skills and knowledge required to handle technological changes as they occur in the apparel industry. Students will gain understanding and competence utilizing apparel-specific CAD programs and technology. Students will have the opportunity to incorporate and demonstrate competence using the skills, knowledge, and abilities acquired through the Fashion Design program during a work practicum in the apparel industry. The practicum consists of 40 hours (one week) onsite, at a business operating in the apparel field.
FD 271 4 credits
Surface Design I
Prerequisite(s): FD 171 or instructor’s permission
Students will learn how to apply design elements and principles to embellish and decorate the surface of fabrics. Experimentation with pigment paints and dyes on natural and synthetic fabrics is encouraged. A variety of techniques to create 3-D effects for fabric surface embellishment are explored and researched. Students develop a collection of resource samples and produce fabric lengths of surface designed fabrics suitable for apparel.
FD 272 4 credits
Surface Design II
Prerequisite(s): FD 171 or instructor’s permission
A continuation of FD 271, covering more advanced surface design techniques and colour experiments through direct application of dyestuffs and paints, printing, immersion dyeing with fibre- reactive dyes, heat transfer printing with disperse dyes, and screen printing with temporary and permanent screens, including stencilling and direct emulsion. Shibori resist techniques of pole wrapping and clamping, along with bound and stitched methods of altering fabric surfaces, will be explored.
FD 281 3 credits
Advanced Construction I
Prerequisite(s): FD 182 and FD 192
Corequisite(s): FD 263 and FD 283
This course explores advanced garment assembly methods and fabric handling techniques. Students will experiment with a variety of fabrics, support materials, stabilizers and construction methods to develop a resource book of samples. Full-scale projects include a soft-tailored lined jacket, a bustier, and a swimsuit. Appropriate finishing techniques and industrial applications will be incorporated throughout garment construction. Proper fit principles will be stressed. Students will be encouraged to coordinate the jacket project with a designed skirt or pant.
FD 282 3 credits
Advanced Construction II
Prerequisite(s): FD 281
Corequisite(s): FD 264 and FD 284
Students will learn industrial construction and finishing techniques and apply this knowledge to the production of a lined coat and jumpsuit. Emphasis will be placed on the development process, construction sequencing, and production states required in the manufacturing of a line as designed in FD 264. A minimum of two complete “line” outfits will be produced. Students will be expected to research appropriate construction methods prior to garment development.
FD 283 3 credits
Advanced Pattern Drafting I
Prerequisite(s): FD 164, FD 182, and FD 192
Corequisite(s): FD 263 and FD 281
Students enrolled in this course will learn more advanced pattern-drafting skills and gain knowledge of apparel industry standards. Students will test patterns using muslin garments to confirm fit and proportion. Neatness, accuracy, and correct fit will be stressed. Full-scale pattern drafts will include fitted jackets, underwire bodices and swimsuits. Students will refine drafts to develop pattern blocks, add seam allowances, and apply appropriate marking and labels. Design interpretation testing will occur periodically throughout the semester.
FD 284 3 credits
Advanced Pattern Drafting II
Prerequisite(s): FD 283
Corequisite(s): FD 264 and FD 281
Students will continue to develop pattern drafting and manipulation skills along with garment fitting techniques. Building upon concepts acquired in FD 283, students will draft and fit the coat block, then perform manipulations to produce the stylized pattern. The jumpsuit project incorporates performance features with fit and ease of movement. Two complete outfits selected from the line designed by the student in FD 264 will be drafted to reflect the ability to convert design sketches into flat patterns. The importance of neatness, accuracy, and correct fit will continue to be stressed.
FD 291 3 credits
Draping
Prerequisite(s): FD 192 or instructor’s permission
The practical study of three-dimensional draping techniques provides the ability to drape fabric on the dress form to create garments. Students acquire a sense of proportion, and a feel for texture and fabric drapability while handling fabric in relation to the design and fit on the dress form. The principles of draping may be used to develop various types of fit to reflect fashion silhouettes and enhance garment style. An overview of draping principles in relation to millinery will also be explored. Students will produce a garment with accompanying headpiece.
FD 292 3 credits
Pattern Grading and Production Processes
Prerequisite(s): FD 192 or instructor’s permission
Students enrolled in this course will gain knowledge and experience in the development of production patterns and the grading of fit-approved patterns to produce accurate size ranges suitable for use in the apparel industry. Students will generate production patterns; comprehend, develop, and created grade charts; identify split and nested grades, and produce size sets. Manual and machine grading methods will be demonstrated and practised. Grade principles are presented in relation to a variety of production processes, and the computerization of grading within the apparel industry is explored. Students will work independently and/or collaboratively throughout the semester.
FD 296 3 credits
Independent Studies — Surface Design
Prerequisite(s): FD 272 or instructor’s permission
Students will further explore surface design concepts and techniques in relation to apparel. Independent research and experimentation with a variety of fabric embellishment processes is emphasized. Individual focus and major projects will be determined after consultation with the instructor.
FD 297 3 credits
Independent Studies — Machine Knitting
Prerequisite(s): FD 172 or instructor’s permission
A continuation of FD 172. Students will learn advanced techniques and more complex operation of the domestic knitting machine by utilizing the ribber bed, lace carriage, and racking arm. Students will develop a resource book of samples and are encouraged to research knit applications and methods while experimenting with a variety of yarns. Knit contour and computer generated knitting patterns will be used to develop garments. After consultation with the instructor, students will plan, design, and produce a machine knit outfit.
FD 298 3 credits
Independent Studies — Weaving
Prerequisite(s): FD 174 or instructor’s permission
This course will reinforce the principles and techniques of threading and weaving on a four-shaft loom. Students will gain a more complex understanding of specific woven structures. Fabric lengths will be designed, drafted, and woven for the construction into garments after consultation with the instructor. Computer- aided design and weaving programs will be utilized for the generation of advanced fabric drafts.
Film
FILM 110 3 credits
North American Film Studies
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is an introduction to the historical development and fundamental principles of film as a creative medium. Students will develop the skills to critically analyze various film genre as a form of cultural communication. The course will entail the screening and discussion of Classical Hollywood films, documentary, independent, and experimental films from North America.
FILM 120 3 credits
Foreign Film Studies
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to theories of film aesthetics and criticism, together with a study of selected foreign movies (with English subtitles). Essays and an examination are required from credit students.
FILM 310 3 credits
Introduction to Film Theory
Prerequisite(s): Film 110 or 120
In this course, students will learn key concepts and major theoretical perspectives in contemporary film theory. Theoretical work will include semiotics, Marxism, Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis, feminist and postmodernist film theory. Students interested in this course might also want to consider Engl 366.
First Nations Studies
These courses are part of the Social Services diploma — First Nations option.
FNST 101 3 credits
Stó:lõ Nation Development
Prerequisite(s): Admittance to the Social Services diploma program or instructor’s permission
The purpose of this course is to enable professional helpers working with the Stó:lõ people to do their jobs more effectively by examining the development of the Stó:lõ Nation, beginning with a historical, socioeconomic overview. The students will explore Stó:lõ cultural philosophy, values, and beliefs, and compare them with Western philosophies, values, and beliefs. Using a framework that encompasses pre-contact, contact, and contemporary Stó:lõ society, students will study the evolution of the Stó:lõ Nations socioeconomic structure.
FNST 102 3 credits
Stó:lõ Traditional Ways of Healing and Helping
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Social Services diploma — General or First Nations options, or instructor’s permission
The purpose of this course is to enable professional helpers working with the Stó:lõ people to do their jobs more effectively by learning about traditional Stó:lõ ways of healing and helping. After exploring the role of self-esteem and motivation in healing, students will learn how techniques of teamwork, sharing, and group work contribute to healing and helping processes. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the importance of building “self-in-relation” for healing and maintaining health. Finally, this course will study the relationship between healing individuals and families and building healthy communities and nations. Students will learn that all ways of helping and healing are interconnected in a “circle of wellness”.
FNST 201 3 credits
Stó:lõ Communications and World View
Prerequisite(s): FNST 101 and FNST 102
The purpose of this course is to enable professional helpers working with the Stó:lõ people to do their jobs more effectively by examining the Stó:lõ world view. Students will explore and examine Stó:lõ learning styles and oral traditions, and compare them to Western learning styles and oral/written traditions.
FNST 202 3 credits
Stó:lõ Social Structure
Prerequisite(s): FNST 101 or FNST 102 or instructor’s permission
This course will examine Stó: lõ social structure from pre-contact to contemporary. The role of Stó:lõ Nation as a service provider, the structure of Stó:lõ communities, and the roles of community members will be explored. In order for students to gain an understanding of Stó:lõ identity, relationships, and interconnectedness, family structure and child rearing practices will be examined. The course is intended to assist professional helpers understand Stó:lõ social structures, particularly family structure. By understanding the complex influences that have contributed to the unique social and family structures within Stó:lõ communities, students will be better prepared to work in a helping capacity with Stó: lõ, and other aboriginal people.
French
FREN 100 3 credits
Introduction to French
Prerequisite(s): None
French 100 is an introductory course for those who have had little (less than Grade 11) or no previous French instruction. The vocabulary and grammatical structures are presented through the use of body language and audio/visual techniques such as pictures, tapes and videos, as well as written material. Students will learn to communicate in relatively natural and spontaneous speech and also develop basic reading and writing skills. The course covers the equivalent of Grade 11 material.
Note: Not open to students with French 11 except with permission of instructor or department head.
FREN 101 3 credits
French Language I
Prerequisite(s): Fren 100, or Fren 11, or instructor’s permission
Introduces you to the French language by an intensive study of important aspects of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar through the use of audio-visual techniques such as flashcards, slides, videotapes and the multimedia laboratory. We teach you to speak, understand, read and write the language by the direct association of visual and aural concepts with their expression in French. The basic goal is to develop “creative communication”.
Note: Not open to students with French 12 except with permission of instructor or department head.
FREN 102 3 credits
French Language II
Prerequisite(s): Fren 101, or instructor’s permission
Continues to develop your ability to express yourself in oral and written French. It directly follows the goals and methods of French 101.
Note: Not open to students with French 12 except with permission of instructor or department head.
FREN 215 3 credits
Intermediate French I
Prerequisite(s): French 12 or Fren 101 and 102
Increases communicative competence through vocabulary expansion, improved pronunciation, and the development of efficient reading and writing techniques. Conducted entirely in French, students work together in small groups reviewing the essential elements of French grammar, discussing short texts of contemporary Francophone authors, and learning composition skills. Participation in multimedia programs, along with regular written assignments and oral tutorials, further improves students’ abilities to understand and express themselves in French.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Fren 215 and 230.
FREN 216 3 credits
Intermediate French II
Prerequisite(s): French 12, or Fren 101 and Fren 102
This course is a companion to French 215 and has similar goals: through an intensive review of grammatical topics already known to the student, and the introduction of some new topics, French 216 will increase communicative competence through vocabulary expansion, improved pronunciation, study of important grammatical concepts and the development of efficient reading and writing techniques. Conducted entirely in French, students work together in small groups reviewing the essential elements of French grammar, discussing literary texts and learning composition skills. Participation in multimedia programs, along with regular written assignments and oral tutorials, will further improve students’ abilities to understand and express themselves in French.
FREN 219 3 credits
Intermediate French Composition
Prerequisite(s): One of Fren 215, 216, or 230
This course focuses on the development of essay-writing skills in French. Selected readings from works by contemporary Francophone authors help introduce principles of clear and effective writing; students work to improve their own writing skills and to resolve common problems in second-language writing.
FREN 225 3 credits
Francophone Language and Culture via Media
Prerequisite(s): Fren 219
Conducted entirely in French. Students will increase their communicative competence and knowledge of Francophone culture by reading on a regular basis articles and advertising from l’Actualité a Québécois magazine, reviewing the major Francophone newspapers via Web access, listening to Radio Canada and viewing television clips from Francophone stations. They will learn specialized vocabulary relating to politics, economics, acronyms and euphemisms. Grammar is reviewed and refined in each class, and tested frequently. Participation in discussions, along with regular written assignments and oral tutorials, further improves students’ abilities to understand and express themselves in French.
FREN 230 3 credits
Intermediate French for French Immersion Students I
Prerequisite(s): Minimum four years study (up to Grade 11) in the French Immersion program, or instructor’s permission
This course is specifically designed for students from French Immersion programs who are at ease communicating in French and who wish to improve their competency. Taught completely in French, this course will provide a thorough grammar review, vocabulary enrichment and development of reading and writing skills which will address ingrained errors such as “franglais” and enable students to use a more sophisticated language. A cultural project, pair and small group work, video presentations, and work in the multimedia lab will complement class discussions.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Fren 215 and Fren 230.
FREN 315 4 credits
Introduction to Francophone Literature
Prerequisite(s): Fren 219 or instructor’s permission
This is a one-semester course, conducted entirely in French, introducing students to Francophone literature. The readings will consist primarily of contemporary short stories from diverse countries, some poetry, a short Québécois novel and a one-act French play. Discussion will focus on differences of genre and style, and on text analysis as well as thematic and cultural content, enabling students to appreciate French writing in its various forms. Particular idiomatic expressions and language usage will be explicated as needed.
FREN 319 4 credits
Advanced French Composition
Prerequisite(s): Fren 219
Corequisite(s): None
This course refines students’ ability to write in French, through the detailed study and practice of stylistic techniques, complex grammatical structures, and vocabulary used in formal contemporary written French.
FREN 325 4 credits
Advanced French Conversation
Prerequisite(s): Fren 219
This one-semester course, conducted entirely in French, will develop students oral fluency, through conversational practice, oral projects and an intensive study of phonetics. The latter includes a close examination of the proper articulation of all vowels, consonants and semi-vowels, syllabification, intonation, “liaison” and “enchaînement” and other linguistic phenomena which will help students acquire a good standard pronunciation. French 325 will also help students learn to understand different accents and idioms which exist in various parts of the Francophone world, such as Québec, Acadie, Martinique and different regions of France. There is a considerable “corrective” component to the course, where students are clearly shown the comparative pronunciation between English and French vowels and consonants in order to teach English speaking students the best way to articulate French sounds and eliminate their English accents.
FREN 330 4 credits
Introductory French Linguistics
Prerequisite(s): Fren 219
Intended for those who wish to teach French or simply develop their knowledge of the structure and phonology of the French language, this course provides an introduction to the study of linguistics in French as well as an examination of various methods of teaching French as a second language. It shows how linguistic theories can be applied to second language learning and teaching to make language acquisition more effective.
FREN 345 4 credits
Cinéma français et québécois depuis 1950
Prerequisite(s): Fren 219
This course offers an analysis of French and Quebec societies since 1950 from a cinematographic perspective. All films will be shown in original French with English subtitles. Students registering in this course must do all oral and written work in French.
Note: Students cannot take Fren 346 for further credit.
FREN 346 4 credits
French and Quebec Culture since 1950 through Film
Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits or may seek permission of instructor
This course offers an analysis of French and Quebec societies since 1950 from a cinematographic perspective. All films will be shown in original French with English subtitles. All coursework will be completed in English.
Note: Students may not take Fren 345 for further credit.
Workplace French
FREN 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 261, 262, 263, 264 and 265:
Workplace French  1 credit each
(In partnership with Canada School of Public Service/École de la fonction publique du Canada)
Prerequisites: Preceding course on this list, or placement by Federal Government Language Training Officer
The curriculum for these courses has been developed by the Canada School of Public Service/École de la fonction publique du Canada. Designed for Federal Public Servants, but now open to the general public, these courses focus on vocabulary and structures used in government memos, reports, and other official documents. The courses emphasize the development of oral proficiency. These courses are offered through a flexible format on a cost-recovery basis. For further information, contact
Julie Laursen at 604-557-4035 or email
julie.laursen@ufv.ca
Note: These courses are not transferable and do not count towards the UCFV minor in French.