Geography
GEOG 101 4 credits
Weather and Climate
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the fields of meteorology and climatology. Emphasis will be placed on atmospheric processes, weather forecasting, and local climates, and on the relationship of these topics to a variety of environmental issues.
GEOG 102 4 credits
Evolution of the Earth’s Surface
Prerequisite(s): None
A course in the study of the origins and development of the earth’s surface features. Emphasis will be placed on the physical processes underlying the dynamics of our changing landscape.
GEOG 130 3 credits
Geography of Canada
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the geography of Canada using the concepts and methods of regional geography to examine the Canadian experience as a set of distinct regions and a nation. Emphasis will be placed on the geographic analysis of current issues, and on the detailed analysis of regional character.
GEOG 131 3 credits
British Columbia
Prerequisite(s): None
Using the concepts and techniques of regional geography, this course examines topics in physical geography, settlement, social, economic and resource geography, and the patterns, landscapes and images which characterize the province.
GEOG 140 3 credits
Human Geography
Prerequisite(s): None
This is a broad survey course of human geography applying the concepts and tools of the discipline to the regions, societies, and landscapes that result from the interaction between humans and their environment and the cultural, economic, social and political landscapes they create.
GEOG 201 4 credits
Introduction to Climatology
Prerequisite(s): Geog 101
A survey course in introductory climatology. The basic principles of atmospheric energy, moisture, and motion. Topics covered will range from the micro-scale (air pollution), to synoptic-scale (hurricanes), and global-scale (climate change).
GEOG 202 4 credits
Introduction to Geomorphology
Prerequisite(s): Geog 102
Geog 202 builds on many topics introduced in Geog102 with emphasis placed on drainage basins, groundwater, mass movements, and glacial geomorphology. A weekend field trip and local in-class trips will develop skills in landform analysis and an understanding of the geomorphology of southwestern British Columbia.
GEOG 211 3 credits
Environmental Issues
(formerly Geog 111)
Prerequisite(s): Any first year geography course
An introduction to the study of people in their physical surroundings. The central themes of the course focus on humans as agents of environmental change, and as users of the earth’s resources. Emphasis will also be placed on examination of fundamental concepts, methods and techniques used to study human/environment systems.
GEOG 233 3 credits
Selected Regions
Prerequisite(s): Any course in geography
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the regional geography of a major world region. Subject matter will include topics drawn from physical and human geography, with emphasis placed on the human/environmental interactions, historic and contemporary, which account for the geographical character of the region.
GEOG 241 3 credits
Social Geography
Prerequisite(s): Geog 140
This course presents students with the opportunity to critically assess the interrelationship between urban space and lifestyle. Focusing on the connections between people and their social environment, topics explored include gender and space, crime, residential segregation and concepts of community and neighbourhood.
GEOG 242 3 credits
Economic Geography
Prerequisite(s): Geog 140
This course introduces the basic concepts and theories of economic geography. Attention is directed to an analysis of the spatial aspects of primary resources, agriculture, energy, manufacturing and services in the contemporary capitalist economy. The objective will be to understand the impact of globalization on economic activity at local, regional and national and international scales.
GEOG 251 4 credits
Cartography I
Prerequisite(s): Any other Geography course
This course provides an introduction to major topics in the field of cartography, with emphasis placed on map and aerial photo interpretation, on the collection and graphic portrayal of spatial data, and on elementary surveying techniques. The course explores a variety of tools and techniques used by geographers in the analysis of physical and human landscapes.
GEOG 253 4 credits
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Prerequisite(s): Any first-year geography course
A geographic information system is defined as a configuration of system hardware and software that captures, stores, analyzes, and displays geographic information. The focus of this course is on the theory and practice of GIS as a tool in geographical analysis and data management. Students will develop competency in the operation of GIS software in a computer lab setting.
GEOG 270 3 credits
Field Techniques in Human Geography
Prerequisite(s): Geog 130 or 131 or 233; 140, 241, or 242; and 251
This course provides an intensive introduction to a variety of tools and techniques used by human geographers to describe and analyze the cultural landscape and the spatial organization of society. Required lab and fieldwork will cover a range of different topics studied in earlier courses, and students will design a major field project based on their specific area of interest.
Second-year standing and instructor’s permission required.
GEOG 271 3 credits
Field Techniques in Physical Geography
Prerequisite(s): Geog 101 and 102; Geog 111 and 251
This course provides an intensive introduction to a variety of tools and techniques used by geographers to describe and analyze the physical environment.
GEOG 301 4 credits
Synoptic Climatology
Prerequisite(s): Geog 201 and Math 104 or 106, or instructor’s permission
An advanced course in synoptic climatology. Examination of the structure of the atmosphere through climatological and meteorological data analysis. Weather prediction using satellite imagery and radar. Emphasis is placed on applied laboratory exercises.
GEOG 302 4 credits
Fluvial Geomorphology
Prerequisite(s): Geog 202
This course provides a comprehensive review of processes and landforms responsible for shaping the fluvial environment. Emphasis is placed on understanding the theoretical basis of fluvial geomorphology and the identification and formative processes of fluvial landforms. Participation in field trips scheduled outside of regular class times is required.
GEOG 304 4 credits
Coastal Geomorphology
Prerequisite(s): Geog 202
The coast represents one of the most dynamic and complex environments on the earth’s surface and the interaction between the marine, terrestrial, and atmospheric systems results in a wide range of coastal processes and landforms. This course will focus on the basic processes operating along the coast, coastal landforms, and themes in applied coastal geomorphology. Participation in field trips scheduled outside of regular class times is required.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for Geog 304 if student has taken Geog 302 prior to 2005 (previously offered as Fluvial and Coastal Geomorphology).
GEOG 311 4 credits
Environment and Resources
Prerequisite(s): Any two of: Geog 201 or 202; Geog 211; Geog 242; Bio 210
Corequisite(s): None. Recommended: Econ 361 (Environmental and Resource Economics)
An investigation into the relationship between humans and their environment in terms of resource use and exploitation. Focus is on integrative thinking about the complexity of environmental management through the examination of biogeochemical concepts as well as socioeconomic concerns; and on the introduction of procedures, techniques, and rationales for managing environmental resources.
GEOG 341 4 credits
World Cities
Prerequisite(s): Geog 241 or Geog 242
Geographic perspectives on the cultural, political, and socio-economic conditions of selected world cities. The spatial context of such problems as urban decay, housing shortages, poverty, sustainability, and social justice will be explored in selected cities.
GEOG 343 4 credits
Geography of Transitional Societies
Prerequisite(s): Geog 241 or 242
This is a course in cultural geography using the approach of cultural/political ecology to survey cultural patterns in the developing world including environmental and cultural change, economic development, and urbanization.
GEOG 344 4 credits
Geography of Urban Development
Prerequisite(s): Geog 241 or Geog 242
This course will apply the principles of urban geographical analysis to the study of urbanization as exemplified in the development of cites in North America.
GEOG 345 4 credits
Historical Geography I
Prerequisite(s): Geog 241 or Geog 242
Using research drawn from a variety of theoretical perspectives, this course explores the concepts and methods of historical geography. Focusing on North America, students will learn not only how to interpret past landscapes, but how such an understanding continues to inform the geographies of the present.
GEOG 346 4 credits
Geography of Religion
Prerequisite(s): Geog 241 or Geog 242
A study of the geographical expression of religion and belief systems, this course covers the origins, diffusion and changing impacts of belief on cultural patterns and landscapes.
GEOG 352 4 credits
Quantitative Methods in Geography
Prerequisite(s): Geog 251 or 253, and one of Math 104, 106 or Psyc 201, or acceptable statistics course
This course introduces geography students to methods in the collection, description, analysis and mapping of data. Techniques in the collection and recording of primary and secondary data will be covered and methods of statistical description and inference will be surveyed. The course will also include topics in the spatial display of data, particularly through computer mapping packages.
GEOG 360 4 credits
Introduction to Regional and Community Planning
Prerequisite(s): Geog 241 or 242
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theories, methods and legalities of community and regional planning in Canada. The planning challenges and social responsibilities accompanying the dynamic nature of urban and suburban development will be debated emphasizing Canadian and British Columbian examples and case studies. Students will also have the opportunity to apply course content to local planning issues or urban problems.
GEOG 400 4 credits
Advanced Topics in Geography
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, including four credits of 300/400 level geography courses
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore a topic or subfield in a new and significant area of geographical research and scholarship. Topics will be chosen from a wide range of physical, human, regional, and technical areas in geography.
GEOG 401 4 credits
Global Climatology
Prerequisite(s): Geog 201 and Math 104 or 106
An advanced course in global climatology. Exploration of the global climate system. Examination of past, present, and possible future climate scenarios. Environmental and socio-economic impacts of nuclear winter, ozone holes, and global warming. Policy responses.
GEOG 402 4 credits
Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology
Prerequisite(s): Geog 302; or Geog 202 with instructor’s permission
This course will examine selected aspects of the stratigraphy, geomorphology and surficial geology of the Quaternary. Regional emphasis will be placed on southwestern British Columbia and adjacent regions of the United States. Fieldwork is an essential component of this course.
GEOG 411 4 credits
Advanced Topics in Environmental Issues
Prerequisite(s): One of Geog 211, 311 or Econ 361, and one other 300/400 level geography course
This course provides students the opportunity to explore topics and issues of environmental concern from a geographical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on seminar discussions, field trips and case studies.
GEOG 433 4 credits
Geography of Selected Regions
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits including four credits of 300/400-level geography courses
A study of the geographical character of a selected region.
GEOG 443 4 credits
Comparative Cultural Geography
Prerequisite(s): Any one of Geog 343, Geog 344, Geog 345, Geog 360, or instructor’s permission
A comparative study of selected world cultures and landscapes in the light of recent theoretical developments in geography. The human use of the earth over time by various cultures will be examined.
GEOG 444 4 credits
The Geography of Suburban Development
Prerequisite(s): Any one of Geog 343, Geog 344, Geog 345, Geog 360
This course represents an extension of the urban geographical themes developed in Geog 344. Whereas Geog 344 establishes the framework of urban development in Canada and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries, the focus in Geog 444 is on the particular nature of suburban development, especially of the post-industrial era.
GEOG 445 4 credits
Historical Geography II
Prerequisite(s): Any one of Geog 343, Geog 344, Geog 345 or Geog 360
This course reviews the nature of the field and considers a wide range of case studies. Students will be expected to locate, evaluate, and use local source materials in designing and researching a major study in historical geography.
GEOG 452 4 credits
Field Methods and Techniques
Prerequisite(s): Geog 352
This course will provide students with opportunities to apply the concepts and skills acquired in previous geography courses to specific research problems in the field. Working both in the classroom and in a local area, students will define and formulate research problems, collect and analyze appropriate data, and design and write formal research reports on their findings. Field problems will be drawn from topics in both physical and human geography. Research reports will be expected to reflect an integrated approach to the study of a local region.
GEOG 460 4 credits
Practicum in Planning
Prerequisite(s): Geog 360 and instructor’s permission
Planning is generally defined as an applied or action-oriented profession, dedicated to addressing ecological, social, economic, and land use challenges at a local or broad level. The purpose of this course is to enable students to engage in an applied program of planning work under the supervision of a planner who is a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP). The four-month practicum presents students with the opportunity to apply techniques and methods as well as establish contacts with practising planners.
GEOG 470 5 credits
Field Studies in Geography
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, including four credits of 300/400-level geography courses; instructor’s permission
This course provides students with an opportunity to explore a world region from a regional geographic perspective, applying a range of geographical skills in the field to identify, analyze, and synthesize the elements comprising regional character. Usually offered in conjunction with a study tour.
GEOG 480 4 credits
Directed Readings
Prerequisite(s): Permission to enter requires written consent of both the supervising faculty member and the department head
Designed for upper-level Geography students who wish to continue research started in conjunction with an earlier course.
GEOG 482 2 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Permission to enter requires written consent of both the faculty member supervising the student and the department head
Designed for upper-level geography students who wish to continue research started in conjunction with an earlier course.
GEOG 483 3 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Permission to enter requires written consent of both the faculty member supervising the student and the department head
Designed for upper-level geography students who wish to continue research started in conjunction with an earlier course.
GEOG 484 4 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Permission to enter requires written consent of both the faculty member supervising the student and the department head
Designed for upper-level geography students who wish to continue research started in conjunction with an earlier course.
Graphic Design
GD 101 3 credits
Introduction to the Graphic Design Environment
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
This course is an overview of the graphics industry and how the designer fits within it. Students will explore the capabilities of the leading graphic design software in relation to the industry for which they are creating their design. Basic understanding of the Mac and PC platforms will be learned as well as processes and materials used in the field.
GD 102 3 credits
History of Graphic Design
Prerequisite(s): None
The history of graphic design is an evolution in aesthetics, technology, and style. This course is designed to give a broad overview of the diverse and rich history in the development of graphic design. The lectures will provide a survey of the major movements in the field from the perspective of the social and political realities from which they developed. The studio component will enable students to create graphic images which reflect the design characteristics of the various movements.
GD 115 2 credits
Drawing I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
This course will introduce students to the basic tools and elements of drawing including how to render objects, both natural and man-made, expand their visual vocabulary, and aid them in the interpretation, organization, and communication of ideas visually.
GD 116 2 credits
Drawing II
Prerequisite(s): GD 115, and admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
The purpose of the course is to develop the skills and ability to render accurate and structurally sound, freehand drawing in line and tone. Using various drawing mediums separately or in combination, the students will explore further the materials and tools of drawing in both black and white and colour. Students will be encouraged to seek new ways of seeing and expressing visual ideas. Anatomy and drawing the figure from life will be introduced and an increased emphasis will be placed on composition.
GD 154 2 credits
Typography I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will study the history and foundation of typography. Also studied through a series of projects will be the formation of letterforms, the particular characteristics and aesthetic values of typefaces, proper layout, and setting of type. Students will work in a traditional context of hand- rendering type.
GD 156 2 credits
Designing with Quark Xpress
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will learn how to produce documentation from design concept right through to output. Practical design projects will range from creating single-sided literature to longer publications incorporating text and graphic elements. The student will have a comprehensive understanding of the features and processes involved in designing with Quark Xpress.
GD 157 2 credits
Designing with Adobe Illustrator
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
This course enables students to produce vector-based illustrations, and to effectively utilize and manipulate this digital drawing tool. Students will learn professional approaches to creating design projects efficiently and learn how to integrate illustrator’s vast array of special effects. Students will be able to prepare files for print and the web.
GD 158 2 credits
Designing with Adobe Photoshop
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Achieving high quality design from Photoshop requires a comprehensive understanding of Photoshop features and processes. This course enables students to acquire this level of theoretical and practical proficiency, including masking, scanning, resolution, selection techniques and the problems of targeting for output processes.
GD 161 3 credits
Graphic Design I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will learn the fundamental principles of design through the creative use of space. The students will learn the architecture behind good design and develop problem solving skills and an ‘eye’ for good design while working with words and images. Visual communication skills will be enhanced through the process of individual and group brainstorming sessions.
GD 163 2 credits
Typography II
Prerequisite(s): GD 154, and admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will be introduced to and become proficient at contemporary typesetting technology. Emphasis will be upon typographic communication and the use of typography as an exclusive element of design. Students will also identify font management/handling issues and postscript/true type technologies. Major project included is the original design of a typeface.
GD 164 2 credits
Corporate Identity Design
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Based on a client’s marketing position the student will be able to visually communicate the client’s business through logo design and then carry the image through to other products from stationary to vehicles. Emphasis will be on the students’ own style. Projects will include the development of computer, design, critiquing, and problem solving skills. Meeting deadlines and group brainstorming will also be focused on.
GD 201 2 credits
Designing with Comparative Software
Prerequisite(s): GD 156 and GD 157, admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
This course is designed to look at the industry and other design software currently being used. Students will be exposed to and will evaluate the software. The students will explore the key features of two of these software programs – Adobe InDesign and Macromedia FreeHand – and produce documents for publication.
GD 203 2 credits
Designing with Macromedia Flash
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will be introduced to time based web design utilizing Macromedia Flash. Emphasis will be placed upon mastering the provided tools and techniques within Flash while being challenged with originality, design aesthetics for the internet, flow of information, bandwidth issues, and user interactivity.
GD 204 2 credits
Designing with Macromedia Dreamweaver
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will be introduced to design for the Web utilizing Macromedia Dreamweaver. Emphasis will be placed upon mastering the provided tools within Dreamweaver while being challenged with originality, user interactivity, variables of the internet, differing technologies, tweaking HTML code by hand, and site organization.
GD 210 2 credits
Pre-Press
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Year I of the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students learn about printing industry and how their work is impacted by the possibilities and limitations of the equipment used to reproduce their work. This course exposes the student to various techniques and methods of producing finished art and files for pre-press. Students will follow a project step-by-step to its end destination and learn the terms used by the industry.
GD 215 2 credits
Illustration I
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Year I of the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
This course introduces the students to the principles and techniques of commercial illustration. Students will learn to convey messages, events, ideas and values in a visual form using a variety of illustration techniques. Creative ideas will be developed from concept through final working drawings for reproduction, with an emphasis on craftsmanship and deadlines.
GD 216 2 credits
Illustration II
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Semester III of the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
This is an advance course on the principles and techniques of commercial illustration. The course will provide the students with the opportunity to expand their personal illustrative techniques and media skills developed in previous level. Assignments will be directed toward conceptual solutions in both advertising and editorial illustration.
GD 217 2 credits
Publication Design
(formerly GD 367)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Semester III of the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will develop designs for publication (books, magazines, newspapers, etc.) from concept to a printed portfolio piece. Industry production processes and materials will also be studied. In addition the students will enhance their computer skills and creativity. Through a series of projects the student will also learn to critique and meet deadlines.
GD 258 3 credits
Website Design
(formerly GD 364)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Semester III of the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will develop their own online portfolio as they learn advanced skills in today’s leading web-based programs. Animation techniques, storyboard development and the development of sequenced art will be learned as well as file management, site mapping, layout and navigation. Emphasis will be on portfolio development both online and CD.
GD 261 3 credits
Graphic Design II
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Year I of the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will further explore the relationship between text, shape, and colour. Emphasis will be on the process of design development from roughs to comprehensives, layout and marker techniques. Exercises in critical analysis and creative problem solving will strengthen and expand the student’s visual communication skills.
GD 262 2 credits
Three-Dimensional Design
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Semester III or the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will develop designs for three-dimensional use (packaging, signage, point-of-purchase, etc.) from concept to a printed portfolio piece. Industry production processes and materials will also be studied. Students will also focus on meeting deadlines and developing their computer skills.
GD 269 3 credits
Business Essentials for Graphic Designers
(formerly GD 369)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Semester III of the Graphic Design program, or permission of the instructor
Students will have an overview of the Graphic Design business. Issues related to employment and self-employment will be covered including resumes, business planning, marketing, time management, paper management and interpersonal skills.
Halq’eméylem
HALQ 101 3 credits
Halq’eméylem Language I
Prerequisite(s): None
Halq’eméylem 101 is an introductory course in the Halq’eméylem language (Upriver dialect). Students will do work on important aspects of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar. Students will work with an instructor and with an Elder fluent in the language, and will use audiovisual techniques, drill patterns, flashcards, pictures and videotapes. The course will also include linguistic instruction in grammar and pronunciation, including relevant aspects of the International Phonetic Alphabet. At the end of the course, students will have learned between 450 and 500 high-frequency words in the language, and will have had an overview of the pronunciation and the major grammatical structures of the language.
HALQ 102 3 credits
Halq’eméylem Language II
Prerequisite(s): HALQ 101
Halq’eméylem 102 is a continuation of HALQ 101. At the end of the course, students will have learned an additional 400 to 500 high-frequency vocabulary items, and will have mastered the entire sound system of the language and the major grammatical structures in some detail. Students will also have begun studying texts in the language.
HALQ 201 3 credits
Intermediate Halq’eméylem I
Prerequisite(s): HALQ 102
Halq’eméylem 201 is an intermediate course in the Halq’eméylem language. At the end of the course, students will have acquired an additional 450-500 vocabulary items (for a total, with prerequisites, of approximately 1500 vocabulary items). Students will have gained control of all of the major inflectional endings in the language, and will be expected to translate extended texts without vocabulary aids. The course will also cover issues in dialectal variation in Upriver speech, and comparison between Upriver vs. Downriver and Island dialects. The course is designed to be challenging and fun, and the students who complete it will have a strong, solid, foundation in the language.
HALQ 202 3 credits
Intermediate Halq’eméylem II
Prerequisite(s): HALQ 201
Halq’eméylem 202 is the second of two intermediate courses in the Halq’eméylem language (Upriver dialect). At the end of the course, students will have acquired an additional 450-500 vocabulary items (for a total, with prerequisites, of approximately 2000 vocabulary items). The course will focus on two areas: (i) advanced texts, where students will work with existing texts, and in addition will work on the collection and transcription of texts with native-speaking Elders; (ii) conversational practice, including role-playing, speech presentations, and a focus on topics for everyday use of the language.
HALQ 210 3 credits
Advanced Halq’eméylem I: Translation Skills
Prerequisite(s): HALQ 201, HALQ 202
This is a course for students who are interested learning to produce appropriate and effective translations of Halq’eméylem into English, and vice versa. Through practice with a variety of materials, and working with a range of different examples of usage from the traditional to the modern, students will master advanced skills in translating to and from the Halq’eméylem language.
HALQ 215 3 credits
Advanced Halq’eméylem II: Transcription and Orthography Development
Prerequisite(s): Halq 201, Halq 202
This course will teach students to transcribe the sound-system of the Halq’eméylem language at a variety of levels, while at the same time exploring issues in the relation between phonetic transcription and the practical writing system. Topics covered will include (a) advanced, highly detailed, transcription and phonetic analysis of the language, (b) predictable sound-changes that affect phonetic detail, and (c) choices in the representation of sounds in practical orthography.
HALQ 220 3 credits
Advanced Halq’eméylem III: Composition and Story-Telling
Prerequisite(s): Halq 202
In this course students will learn to compose their own Halq’eméylem narratives. Narrative styles to be explored will include traditional-style speeches, introductions, longhouse oratory, and oral story-telling. In addition, the class will cover the extension and evolution of traditional Stó:lõ narrative styles to non-traditional areas, including written (as opposed to purely oral) story-telling, letter-writing, and electronic messaging.
HALQ 310 4 credits
Advanced Halq’eméylem IV: Curriculum Development and Teaching Methodologies
Prerequisite(s): Halq 202 and one of Halq 210, 215, or 220
This course is designed for students interested in working on curriculum materials for the Halq’eméylem language. The course will cover general issues related to curriculum development, including scope and sequencing, teaching models, and learning outcomes. This general theory will then be applied, through a combination of analysis and practical projects, to the development of curriculum materials and teaching methodologies for the Halq’eméylem language.
Health Sciences
All seats for these courses are reserved for nursing students. The nursing courses (see Nursing, page 315) and most of the support courses for each semester, are prerequisites for the course work in the next semester. Due to the integrated nature of the nursing courses, progression from one semester to the next requires concurrent completion of the nursing courses.
HSC 110 3 credits
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Nursing program
This course focuses on the principles of human anatomy and physiology. Selected organ systems are discussed and aspects of histology, cell biology, and physiology are included. Concepts such as pathophysiology, homeostasis, and the relationship between structure and function are stressed throughout. This course builds on a basic knowledge of biology (Grade 12) and chemistry (Grade 11).
HSC 112 3 credits
Anatomy and Physiology II
Prerequisite(s): HSC 110
This course focuses on the principles of human anatomy and physiology and is a continuation of HSC 110. Remaining organ systems are discussed and aspects of histology, cell biology, and physiology are included. Concepts such as pathophysiology, homeostasis, and the relationship between structure and function are stressed throughout. This course builds on a basic knowledge of biology (Grade 12) and chemistry (Grade 11).
HSC 114 1 credit
Introduction to Pharmacology
Prerequisite(s): HSC 110
Corequisite(s): HSC 112
As an introduction to pharmacology, this course will provide a broad overview of pharmacological principles with an emphasis on therapeutics. Topics covered include pharmacokinetics, therapeutic range, pharmacodynamics, selectivity, toxicity, drug interactions and role of the nurse as patient educator. Pediatric and geriatric populations’ responses to drugs will be investigated. Drug classifications will be introduced using diuretics, narcotic analgesics, and cardiovascular medications as examples.
HSC 210 3 credits
Pathophysiology I
Prerequisite(s): HSC 112, HSC 114
This course introduces the study of the physiology of alterations in health. Students will build on existing knowledge of human anatomy and physiology by examining pathophysiological states. Physiologic changes and responses to illness are addressed in four separate units which encompass the effects of illness on selected body systems and functions. Related microbiology, immunology, and pharmacology content will be integrated through each unit to reflect the interrelated and holistic nature of the body’s response to illness.
HSC 212 3 credits
Pathophysiology II
Prerequisite(s): HSC 210
This course is a continuation of the study of physiology of alterations in health. Students will build on existing knowledge of pathophysiology presented in Pathophysiology I (HSC 210). Physiologic changes and responses to illness are addressed in four separate units encompassing the effects of illness on selected body systems and functions. Related content of microbiology, immunology and pharmacology will be integrated throughout each unit to capture the interrelated and holistic nature of the body’s response to illness.
HSC 310 3 credits
Ethics in Health Care
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 220
This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth study of ethics as it applies to the nursing profession. The course will facilitate exploration of numerous ethical problems in nursing and the role of the nurse in working toward the resolution of ethical conflict. The content will examine theories and principles of health care ethics, basic decision-making processes in ethics, morality and moral decision making, and a detailed discussion of ethical issues in nursing from both a professional and interdisciplinary perspective. Selected case studies will be reviewed and reflected upon as situations for the application of ethical decision making.
HSC 312 3 credits
Canadian Health Care System
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 306
Health care systems are in transition. The health care systems established in Canada over the last century are coming under scrutiny and undergoing tremendous change. To understand how and why they are changing we must first understand how the systems developed. The 27 sessions of this course provide a framework by which to understand the development, evolution and refinement of health care systems.
HSC 410 3 credits
Health Law
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 306
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the origin and sources of the law as it applies to the Canadian health care system. The course will stimulate an appreciation for legal terminology, reasoning, and processes as well as the basic principles of law which apply to and govern the delivery of health care services in Canada. It is also designed to develop an ability to identify the legal aspects of health care practice, governance and administration as well as an ability to determine when and how to use legal counsel effectively.
History
HIST 101 3 credits
Canada: Prelude to Confederation
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the development of British North America from the pre-contact period until the Confederation era. Topics include the British conquest, the fur trade, Anglophone/Francophone relations, the struggle for home rule, the rebellions of the 1830s, the economic transformation of central Canada, developments in the Pacific and Atlantic regions, and the origins and nature of confederation.
Hist 101 and Hist 102 are basic to advanced Canadian studies in the humanities and social sciences. Future teachers are also encouraged to enrol in Canadian history courses.
HIST 102 3 credits
Canada 1867 to the Present
Prerequisite(s): None
Investigates the development of the Canadian nation from the time of Confederation until the recent past. Topics include MacDonald’s national economic strategy, conflict and consensus between English and French Canada, the Riel rebellions, rise of the grain trade and political protest in the prairie provinces, the Laurier years, the impact of industrialization on Canadian society, the conscription crises, the waning of British influence and the increasing American impact on Canadian affairs, the Mackenzie King era, the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, economic reform, and the constitutional debate.
Hist 101 and Hist 102 are basic to advanced Canadian studies in the humanities and social sciences.
HIST 105 3 credits
British Columbia, 1774-1972
Prerequisite(s): None
This course examines a selection of themes beginning with European contact in the late 18th century and concluding with contemporary social trends. These will include relations between newcomers and aboriginal peoples, the staple export economy, fur trade and gold rush society, B.C.’s confederation with Canada, reform movements (social gospel, prohibition, maternal feminism), the rise of organized labour, theory and practice of racism, and political tradition.
Students planning careers in British Columbia’s public schools are encouraged to enrol in this and other B.C. studies courses.
HIST 109 3 credits
A History of the English, 1066-1688: The Emerging Nation-State
Prerequisite(s): None
An examination of the issues that combined to transform England from a medieval society into a comparatively strong, centralized nation-state. Against the background of succeeding monarchs the constitutional, economic, military, religious, colonial, and social themes that produced early modern England will be studied.
Your appreciation of English civilization will be enhanced by studying English literature (Engl 201/202) either subsequent to or concurrent with Hist 109/110.
HIST 110 3 credits
A History of Britain, 1688-1990: Great Power Status and Beyond
Prerequisite(s): None
An examination of the significant factors that account for the rise of modern Britain and her empire to the heights of the world’s greatest power during the Victorian era and her subsequent decline in the 20th century to second-rank status. Within this economic, political, and social framework gender issues will be explored with a view to understanding the experiences of the masses, the middling classes, and the aristocracy.
Your appreciation of English civilization will be enhanced by studying English literature (Engl 201/202) either subsequent to or concurrent with Hist 109/110.
HIST 111 3 credits
Europe, 1890-1939
Prerequisite(s): None
An enquiry into 20th century Europe to 1939, a Europe dominated by such revolutionary forces as technology, total war, and the totalitarian regimes of Mussolini, Hitler, and Stalin. Through a consideration of politics, economics, militarism, diplomacy, society, and ideas, you will develop an understanding of the origins of contemporary Europe.
HIST 112 3 credits
Contemporary Europe, 1939 to the Present: From Ruin to Rejuvenation
Prerequisite(s): None
Traces the recovery of Europe from the awesome destruction of World War II to the new-found prosperity and optimism of the eighties. A study of such issues as total war, Cold War rivalry, the decline of empire, the “third world”, student radicalism, the European common market, and the thaw in East-West relations will lead to an understanding of Europe’s place in today’s world.
HIST 115 3 credits
Traditional East Asian Civilizations
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the evolution of East Asian civilizations (with emphasis on China and Japan) from ancient times to the early 19th century. The focus is on social structure, cultural tradition, economic systems, and political institutions in pre-modern China and Japan.
HIST 201 3 credits
European History, 1300-1789: The Rise and Decline of the Ancien Regime
Prerequisite(s): None
A survey of Early Modern Europe from its birth in a crisis of the medieval world to the French Revolution and the emergence of full “modernity”. Themes examined include: the foundations of Western Civilization, the Renaissance and Reformation, the rise of the sovereign state, European expansion and the emergence of a capitalist economy, the Scientific Revolution, popular culture, the experience of women, absolute monarchy, the Enlightenment, and the origins of the French Revolution.
Hist 201 is strongly recommended as a foundation course for all history students.
HIST 202 3 credits
European History, 1789-1919: The Revolutionary Age
Prerequisite(s): None
An inquiry into the significant economic, political, social, intellectual, and cultural issues that, taken together, produced a revolutionary era in 19th century Europe. Among the themes to be considered are: political revolt — French and Russian style - the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, the emerging masses, revolutionary ideas, and the welfare of society.
HIST 235 3 credits
Late Imperial and Modern China
Prerequisite(s): None
A survey of the last 400 years of Chinese history. The course is divided into the Late Imperial, Republican and People’s Republic eras and examines the key social, political, and intellectual issues of each. The truly revolutionary changes that have taken place in Chinese society will be examined in the light of traditional institutions, internal forces of change, and shifting international influences.
HIST 236 3 credits
Japanese History since 1600
Prerequisite(s): None
A survey of the last 400 years of Japanese history. The course is divided into the Late Traditional, Meiji, Prewar, and Postwar eras and examines the key social, political and intellectual issues of each. The evolution of Japanese society to today’s position of influence and affluence is examined through the lens of internal forces of change and international complexities.
HIST 241 3 credits
History of the United States to 1865
Prerequisite(s): None
A survey of the major developments in American history and historiography from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War. Attention will be given to social, economic, and political institutions, and to the lives of ordinary people.
HIST 242 3 credits
History of the United States since 1865
Prerequisite(s): None
An examination of the struggles to extend the promises of American democracy to all citizens in a rapidly changing political economy, from the end of the Civil War to the present. Topics include industrialization, role of the state, foreign policy, racism, poverty, changing gender roles, religion, and more.
HIST 261 3 credits
Latin American History: The Colonial Experience
Prerequisite(s): None
This course surveys the history of Latin America, from the time of the great pre-Columbian city-states and empires (Mayan, Aztec and Inca), through the colonial era, to the emergence of independent nations in the early nineteenth century. Throughout, the course focuses on how the interaction between Native Americans, Spaniards, Portuguese and people of African descent created distinct societies in the “New World.”
HIST 262 3 credits
Latin American History: The National Experience
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is a survey of some of the principal themes in Latin American history from the time of independence to the present. Topics will include Latin America’s place in the international economy, social and class relations, populism, military regimes, twentieth century revolutions, and the role of the United States in the region.
HIST 264 3 credits
History of India: Akbar to Independence
Prerequisite(s): None
The Indian subcontinent comprises a vast geographic area embracing a startlingly complex and ancient array of cultures. The first objective of History 264 is to provide an introduction to the region with reference to the main themes that shaped its evolution from the Mughal Empire to independence. The course will begin by studying the historiography of South Asia in both the imperial and post-imperial eras. The Mughal Empire, the Company Raj and imperial rule will be explored with reference to Indian society. The impact of the Rebellion and rise of nationalism leading to independence will be studied. Finally, History 264 will study the impact of India on Britain and the Indian diaspora on the world. The second objective of the course is to explore the craft of historical research, analysis and writing.
HIST 300 4 credits
“Learning” and “Doing” History: The Philosophy and Methodologies of History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course has two major objectives: to introduce you to the various philosophies and methodologies of history; and to allow you to experience the “doing” or “making” of history, by examining the nature of historical evidence, and by applying what you have learned about philosophy, evidence, and historiography to selected methodological problems.
HIST 301 8 credits
Applied Studies in History
Hist 301A/301B
Prerequisite(s): Department permission required; nine credits of lower-level history; priority will be given to History majors, extended minors and minors; computer skills strongly recommended.
History 301 is designed to integrate applied experience and training into students’ academic studies in history. Through an extended practicum, students participate in supervised, unpaid work experience with a local employer or institution to apply and build upon their historical skills and open up employment opportunities through work contacts. In addition, in-class seminars provide a chance to examine the conceptual issues around historical representation outside the classroom; students will critically assess a range of historical sites, including museums and historical recreations, popular history in print, film and television histories, and history as it is taught in the school system.
* Applied Studies in History is a full-year course. Hist 301A is normally offered Sept-Dec, and Hist 301B follows. Hist 301B must be taken in the same academic year as Hist 301A. Students must take both to receive credit. Only four of these credits will count toward the History major, Extended minor, or Minor requirements. The other four credits can be used for upper-level electives.
HIST 308 4 credits
European Culture and Ideas, 1400-1789
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include Hist 201
This course examines selected themes in the cultural and intellectual history of Early Modern Europe and asks how and why Europeans thought the things they did in the years between 1400 and 1789. Themes may include popular culture, the witch craze, the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment.
HIST 310 4 credits
Women and the Family in Western Europe, 1700-1920
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. History 110 and 202 are strongly recommended
An introduction to the history of women and the family in Western Europe between 1700 and 1920 and related historiographical controversies and methodological problems. The British and French experience will be compared with an emphasis on the former.
HIST 314 4 credits
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of Hist 109, Hist 110 or Hist 264
This course will examine the forces that shaped the emergence, development and collapse of the British Empire from the 17th to the 20th century. The impact of the empire on British economy and society as well as its impact on its colonial subjects will be considered. Issues such as race, gender and class in the context of constantly changing metropolitan and imperial cultural structures will receive special consideration.
HIST 315 4 credits
War and Society in the Western World
Prerequisite(s): Nine lower-level history credits, which must include one of Hist 111, Hist 112, Hist 201, or Hist 202
History 315 examines the interrelationship between western society and war from antiquity to the present. The influence of politics, economics, social stratification, and technology on the conduct of war will be emphasized. This kind of military history represents a change from the traditional “great captains and campaigns” approach to a multifaceted approach that puts warfare into the broader spectrum of human activity. Particular emphasis is placed on the early modern and modern periods. (Students who took Hist 399 in Winter 2000 may not take Hist 315 for further credit.)
HIST 319 4 credits
France since 1789
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course will examine the political, social, economic, and intellectual development of France from the Revolution to the Fifth Republic. Themes explored include the revolutionary tradition, the Napoleonic myth, republican ideology, the labour movement, the status of women, mass politics and mass consumption, the French Left and communism, the French Right and fascism, collaboration and resistance, nationalism and imperialism, the family and sexuality, and the political significance of changing attitudes to crime, madness, and disease.
HIST 320 4 credits
The Holocaust, 1933-1945
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of History 111, Hist 112, or Hist 202
This course examines a fundamental event, the Nazis’ restructuring of Germany and Europe according to racial criteria that involved the relocation and decimation of entire populations, a mosaic of victims including as many Jews as the Nazis could lay their hands on. This premeditated crime required the efforts of an entire society, purportedly civilized, employing modern scientific, bureaucratic, industrial, and professional methods. This event continues to astound and resist comprehension, a problem which scholars have attempted to overcome lest it be forgotten, marginalized, or denied.
HIST 323 4 credits
History of Education in Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course examines the major trends in historical writing on Canadian education and reviews the key developments in Canada’s educational history from the early 19th century to the present. Themes include the emergence of the public school system in the 19th century, the politics of education before World War One, school experiences for students and teachers, progressive education ideologies, First Nations schooling, the institutional effects of gender and race/ethnicity, and curriculum change over time. An emphasis will be on education history in British Columbia.
This course is also offered as Educ 323. Students cannot take Educ 323 for further credit. Students wanting education credit must register for Educ 323.
HIST 325 4 credits
Canadian Sport History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course examines the differing roles of sport in Canada from the time of New France to the late 20th century. Topics will include theoretical and historiographical trends in sport history; industrialization, state formation, and the rise of organized sport; the roots of professionalism and sport commerce; the struggle between amateurism and professional sports; gender identities and conflict in sport; and the business of sport, sport media, and state involvement after 1945.
HIST 326 4 credits
The History of Native Peoples in Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course presents a topical survey of the history of Native Peoples in Canada, from pre-contact times to the present. The course proceeds in a roughly chronological fashion to examine topics such as: the relations between Native Peoples and European newcomers during the early years of imperial competition and fur trade; the evolution of government policy in the 19th and 20th centuries; the role of missionaries, residential schools, and agricultural policy; political organization among First Nations; and current issues such as land claims, “Pan-Indianism”, and cultural revival.
HIST 329 4 credits
Canadian Family History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course is a detailed examination of the changing Canadian family, from the 18th century to the present.
HIST 340 4 credits
Colonial America and the Early Republic to 1815
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include Hist 241
This course will explore the forces shaping the establishment of the American colonies, their development as a distinct people within the British empire, and the challenges facing them as an independent republic. It will seek to explain colonial America and the early republic from a trans-Atlantic perspective. Topics will include: Europe and the “imagined landscape” of the “New World”, settlers and indigenous peoples, community formation, Europe, Africa and America, communication and the creation of an Atlantic culture, Empire and constitution, wars and revolution, establishing the republic, slavery, gender and family, frontier and the American identity, and the War of 1812.
HIST 358 4 credits
African Slavery in the Americas
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course explores the development of the Atlantic slave trade and the history of African slavery in the Americas. It takes a broad view, examining the institution of slavery over four centuries, while considering the diverse experiences of slaves in the hemisphere’s distinct colonies and early nation-states. Topics may include the impact of slavery on African polities, the formation of Afro-American societies and cultures, the perspectives of both slaves and slave owners, the genesis of new identities and ideologies regarding race, class, and gender, the mechanisms used to keep slaves under control and the forms of resistance they practiced, and the struggle to achieve personal freedom and abolition.
HIST 359 4 credits
Problems in Latin American Regional History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
Advanced study of selected problems in Latin American history. Topics will have a regional or national focus, and may also be restricted to a specific period. Examples include the Andes under Inca and Spanish rule, Brazil from empire to republic, Mexico since the revolution of 1910, or military dictatorship in the Southern Cone during the late 20th century.
HIST 364 4 credits
Indian Social History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
Hist 264 is recommended
This course will examine the forces shaping the emergence of modern Indian society from the 17th century to the 1980s. Issues such as imperialism, nationalism, urbanization, and industrialization will be explored with reference to their impact on ethnicity, caste, class, and gender in Indian society to recent times.
HIST 370 4 credits
The American Civil Rights Movement
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course examines the African-Americans’ struggle for racial justice, from the 1930s to the 1960s, and recent historiographical debates in the field. Topics will include the use of nonviolence as a strategy for social change; armed resistance and black nationalism; the place of religion in the struggle for, and resistance to, integration; gender dynamics and other tensions within the movement; the role of white allies and the federal government; the impact of the Cold War on civil rights debates; and northern racism. Special attention will be paid to popular and academic representations of the movement.
HIST 380 4 credits
Culture and National Identity in Modern America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
An examination of Americans’ contested vision of their national identity and culture from World War I to the present. Special attention will be devoted to the tensions between maintaining a sense of collective identity and cohesiveness, and recognizing the diversity of American society.
HIST 381 4 credits
Social History of Late Imperial China
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course looks at changes in Chinese society and culture during the late imperial period. Topics include demographic change; social stratification; family structures; gender relations; elite and popular cultures; education and literacy; race and ethnicity; Chinese modernity; the emergence of capitalism in China. (Students who took Hist 399 between Fall 2001 and Fall 2003 may not take Hist 381 for further credit).
HIST 385 4 credits
Imperialism and Colonialism in Modern Asia
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course will examine the process of empire building in Asia by the major imperial powers since the early 19th century. The impact of the various imperialist and colonial activities in different parts of Asia will also be studied.
HIST 390 4 credits
European Socialism from the First to the Third International
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
An examination of the evolution of socialist thought and practice in Europe from Marx to Lukacs and Gramsci. Topics covered include the variety of labour movements and their relation to socialist parties; the division between Soviet and Western Marxism; and the impact on socialism of World War I, the Bolshevik Revolution, feminism, and fascism.
HIST 396 4 credits
Topics in North American History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
The topics will be in the field of North American history, and will vary with the instructor. Typically this course will be offered by a visiting scholar.
Different topics will be identified by adding a letter to the course numbers, e.g., 396c, 396d
HIST 397 4 credits
Topics in European History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
The topics will be in the field of European history, and will vary with the instructor. Typically this course will be offered by a visiting scholar.
Different topics will be identified by adding a letter to the course numbers, e.g., 397c, 397d.
HIST 398 4 credits
Topics in Asian History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
The topics will be in the field of Asian history, and will vary with the instructor. Typically this course will be offered by a visiting scholar.
Different topics will be identified by adding a letter to the course numbers, e.g., 398a, 398b.
HIST 399 4 credits
Special Topics in History I
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
The topics will vary with the instructor, but will be limited to those which our library resources can support and those which lie outside the subject areas currently offered by our faculty (e.g. topics in Early Modern European History or East/Central/Southern European History).
HIST 408 4 credits
Liberty and Authority in 19th Century Thought
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
An examination of political philosophies in their social and economic context. The experience of Britain as well as that of continental Europe will be included. Students will be required to read from contemporary sources, in translation where necessary. (Seminar)
HIST 410 4 credits
The Industrialization of European Society
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history; Hist 109, Hist 110, Hist 201, and Hist 202 are strongly recommended
An examination of the economic origins of modern European society from 1700 to 1914. The course will focus on a comparative study of Britain — the industrial pioneer — and the varied experiences of other nation-states as industrialization spread across continental Europe. The intellectual dimension and social consequences of industrialization will also be studied. (Seminar)
HIST 415 4 credits
Victorian Britain
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Hist 109 and 110 are strongly recommended
Prompted by an industrial revolution and a population boom, nineteenth century Britain embarked upon comparatively rapid and persistent change at all levels of society; in short, upon modern times. The goal of the course is to examine confrontations involving the forces for change and those for continuity over important economic, political, social and intellectual issues with a view to understanding the nature of Victorian society (1830-1906). Within this context the following themes will be explored: the meaning of the “Industrial Revolution” and its social impact, the making of a class society, constitutional reform, the role of government in a laissez-faire era, pressure group politics, the illiberal possibilities in liberal ideology, the Irish question, gender relations in Victorian society, the rise of organized labour and late nineteenth century economic decline. (Seminar)
HIST 418 4 credits
The Great War, 1914-1918
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of Hist 111 or Hist 202; or nine credits of lower-level history and Hist 315
This course examines the origins and course of the Great War and the peace treaties that concluded the conflict. This course offers an opportunity to study the diplomatic, military, economic, and social causes of the war. It also follows the course of the war, both on the Western and Eastern fronts and those fronts opened all around the world on land, sea, and in the air. Most importantly, students will be exposed to the historical debates and a variety of sources used to understand the events. Finally, the Great War will be positioned in a context that emphasizes its crucial role in ending the 19th century and in shaping events that led to and defined an even greater war, World War II. (Seminar)
HIST 420 4 credits
World War II
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history which must include Hist 112. In addition, students must have completed Hist 315 or 320
This course addresses selected topics in World War II history such as the soldier’s experience, the myth and reality of resistance, the development of weapons systems capable of destroying entire societies, the war against civilians, the decision to use atomic bombs, the judgment or misjudgment at Nuremberg and Tokyo, why the Allies won, and the politics of remembrance. (Seminar)
HIST 428 4 credits
The Social and Economic History of Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine lower-level history credits, which must include one of Hist 101 or Hist 102
Selected problems in Canadian social and economic history. (Seminar)
HIST 430 4 credits
Canada and Migration
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history.
This course will survey the history and historiography of some of the key migrant groups in Canada, consider major trends in immigration policy, and assess the impact of changing immigrant profiles. It will also address major themes and the key theoretical approaches to migration studies. Migration literature will supplement the historical readings. (Seminar)
HIST 436 4 credits
History of British Columbia
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
Selected problems in the social, cultural, economic and political development of British Columbia. (Seminar)
HIST 454 4 credits
Gender and Sexuality in U.S. History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of Hist 241 or Hist 242
This course will introduce students to major themes and new approaches in the history of gender and sexuality. We will examine the changing constructions of masculinity and femininity in the United States, from the colonial era to the late twentieth century. More specifically, we will look at how prescribed social and cultural norms have shaped definitions of acceptable behaviour in areas as diverse as politics, work, family and sexuality; how these norms have changed over time; and how men and women of different classes, races, ethnicity and sexual orientation have responded to these norms. (Seminar)
HIST 456 4 credits
Citizenship in America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower level history, which must include one of Hist 241 or Hist 242
This course examines the changing and contested definitions of citizenship in the United States from the late 18th century to the late 20th century. Through a chronological and thematic approach, we will examine how membership in the American political and civic community has been defined over the years. We will look at legal, political, economic and social definitions of citizenship, and pay special attention to the dynamics of exclusion based on race, ethnicity, economic status, religion, gender and sexual orientation. All these have fundamentally shaped the definition and exercise of one’s rights and obligations as a citizen of the United States. (Seminar)
HIST 457 4 credits
Sexuality and Gender in Latin America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of Hist 261 or Hist 262
This course examines the history of sexuality and gender in Latin America from the colonial era to the present. Topics may include the historical and sociocultural construction of sexuality and gender, as well as the complex relationship between sex, gender, and power; patriarchy, honour, and authority; contested gender relations and the family; machismo and notions of masculinity and femininity; the nation-state’s concern with gender, moral order, and the control of sexual behaviour; sexual identities and politics; and the intersection of gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity. (Seminar)
Students who have completed Hist 459C may not take Hist 458 for further credit.
HIST 458 4 credits
History of Indigenous Peoples in Latin America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of Hist 261 or Hist 262
This course explores the history of indigenous peoples in Latin America through the in-depth study of a particular region (the Maya area, central Mexico, the Andes, or the Amazon), typically from the pre-European period to the present. Topics may include the political, economic, and sociocultural transformation of indigenous societies under colonial rule; the shifting, complex relationship between indigenous peoples and the state, considering questions of citizenship, ethnicity, class, and gender; national ideology and indigenismo; struggles over land, labour, and other resources; religious change; repression and rebellion; the impact of state-directed development policies; and the emergence of new identities. (Seminar)
HIST 459 4 credits
Topics in the Political and Social History of Latin America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history (Effective September 2006: Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of Hist 261 or Hist 262)
Advanced study of selected topics in Latin American history. Topics will have a thematic or comparative focus, and may include contact and conquest, colonial identity, nationalism and independence, elite structures, agrarian revolution, populism, the military and society, and Latin American international relations. (Seminar)
HIST 464 4 credits
India, the Punjab and Diaspora: A Study of Migration and Community Formation in Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Hist 264 is strongly recommended
The Punjab and adjacent regions of northern India have long been a major source of South Asian migration to Canada. History 464 seeks to understand the factors that encouraged the pre- and post- Independence diasporas by studying the history of northern India with special reference to the Punjab. It will explore the reasons that the Punjab developed special connections with Canada. The course will then focus on the process of community formation as South Asians sought to gain a foothold amongst an often hostile Anglo-Canadian society. History 464 shall explore the maturation of Indo-Canadian society and its integration into the broader Canadian cultural mosaic. Special attention will be paid to the Sikh community and its experience in British Columbia. (Seminar)
HIST 465 4 credits
British India
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Hist 264 or Hist 314 is recommended
This course will explore the rise of the British presence in India and the emergence of a distinct Anglo-Indian society from the 18th century to Indian independence. The impact of Anglo-British society on Britain as well as India will be considered. Issues such as imperialism, racism, gender, and class in the context of a hybrid colonial-metropolitan society will receive special consideration. (Seminar)
HIST 484 4 credits
Gender History in Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course will review major interpretive issues in the history of gender in Canada. Possible topics include gender and work; the gendering of settlement; race, class, and gender; sex and sexuality; and the history of masculinity. (Seminar)
HIST 485 4 credits
La Belle Epoque: Sex, Psyche, and Society
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history which must include one of Hist 110, 111, or 202
The years 1890-1914 were a period of cultural revolution associated with modernism in the arts, Freudian psychoanalysis, irrationalist philosophy, and the birth of new disciplines: sociology, sexology, and crowd psychology. The revolutionary changes in painting, the novel, and social and political thought, will be related to the new phenomena of mass consumption, monopoly capitalism, the new imperialism, the “new woman,” mass politics, and dramatic developments in technology and science. (Seminar)
HIST 486 4 credits
Problems in the Chinese Communist Revolution
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course will examine the origins and development of the Chinese Communist revolution from the May Fourth period to the founding of the People’s Republic of China. With emphasis on the social and ideological aspects, the course will investigate the relationship between party leadership and mass participation in the development of a revolutionary movement in China before 1949. (Seminar.)
HIST 487 4 credits
Society and Politics in China since 1949
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
This course studies the major social and political changes in China under Communism since 1949 with emphasis on the interplay between ideology and policy. It also analyses the relationship between China’s domestic development and external policy. (Seminar)
HIST 489 4 credits
Directed Studies in History — Projects
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, and written consent of both the faculty member and the department head. 12 credits of upper-level history recommended
Designed for students who wish to examine in greater depth a particular historical problem. It will be offered either as an individual reading course or as small seminars, depending upon student and faculty interest. Admission only by consent of instructor.
HIST 490 4 credits
Directed Studies in History — Readings
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, and written consent of both the faculty member and the department head. 12 credits of upper-level history recommended
Designed for students who wish to examine in greater depth a particular historical problem. It will be offered either as an individual reading course or as small seminars, depending upon student and faculty interest. Admission only by consent of instructor.
HIST 499 4 credits
Special Topics in History II
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
The topics will vary with the instructor, but will be limited to those which our library resources can support and those which lie outside the subject areas currently offered by our faculty (e.g., topics in Early Modern European History or East/Central/Southern European History). (Seminar.)
Human Services
Many of the seats in these courses are reserved for students in the Social Work and Human Services programs (see also Social Work course descriptions beginning on page 330). Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space.
Note: For current transferability information see the B.C. transfer guide online at www.bccat.bc.ca
HSER 120 3 credits
Introduction to Interpersonal Communications
(formerly SSSW 120)
Prerequisite(s): None
Introduces basic self-awareness and interpersonal communication skills. Students will learn about the nature of the communications process. The emphasis will be on developing and practising the ability to communicate effectively with others. As part of the course requirements, students will be expected to share personal (but not necessarily private) experiences with others.
HSER 127 1 credit
Practicum Placement Seminar
(formerly SSSW 127)
Pre- or corequisite(s): SOWK 110, HSER 120, HSER 190, CMNS 155, and admission into Community Support Worker program
This course will prepare you for your practicum. Included are discussions of various jobs in the field, requirements of the job, and the values and attitudes necessary for success in the field along with relevant information for selecting and beginning a practicum. In a human services practicum, students are matched to an experienced supervisor in the field who shares expertise and acts as a role model.
HSER 129 1 credit
Seminar
(formerly SSSW 129)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into Social Services program
Corequisite(s): SOWK 110, HSER 120, CMNS 155
The practicum seminar aims to prepare you for your practicum. The seminar will introduce you to various methods of fieldwork, fieldwork opportunities in the community, and relevant information required for selecting and beginning a social service practicum. In a human services practicum, students are matched to an experienced supervisor in the field who shares expertise and acts as a role model.
HSER 130 6 credits
Practicum I — Social Services
(formerly SSSW 130)
Prerequisite(s): CMNS 155 or Engl 105, SOWK 110, HSER 120, and HSER 129 (in the previous semester), or instructor’s permission.
Supervised experience in work situations in which you could later find employment. You will have an opportunity to practice skills gained in prerequisite courses and will receive feedback about your competencies. There will be a weekly seminar, either on an individual or group basis.
HSER 131 6 credits
Practicum
(formerly SSSW 131)
Prerequisite(s): CMNS 155, HSER 120, 127, 190, 196, SOWK 110, and First Aid Certificate (Red Cross Standard First Aid, Red Cross Emergency First Aid, Occupational First Aid Level I, or St. John’s Standard First Aid).
Pre- or corequisite(s): HSER 192, 195
Supervised experience in work situations in which you could later find employment. You will have an opportunity to practice skills gained in prerequisite courses and will receive feedback about your competencies. There will be a weekly seminar, either on an individual or group basis.
HSER 150 3 credits
Approaches to Helping: A Theoretical Overview
(formerly SSSW 150)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 120, and Psyc 101 or SOWK 225, or instructor’s permission
Through familiarization with the main values and issues underlying various therapeutic approaches in counselling/helping, the participants will work toward a better understanding, clarification and development of their own personal and helper values and style of helping. Participants will be exposed to basic therapeutic orientations, basic issues in helping, and ethical issues in being a helper. Participants will be encouraged to explore their own personal set of values which affects their helping style.
HSER 160 3 credits
Introduction to Gerontology
(formerly SSSW 160)
Pre- or corequisite(s): Soc 101, and one of CMNS 155 or Engl 105
A multi-disciplinary introduction to the concept of aging in our society. Explores the impact on individual functioning and adjustment of such factors as cognition, personality, health and physical change, economic and vocational status, and social relationships and status.
HSER 190 3 credits
Introduction to Community Support
(formerly SSSW 190)
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the field of community support for people working or planning to work in a direct hands-on position supporting children or adults with mental disabilities. The course offers an overview of historical attitudes shaping service provision, and how service provision denies or supports human and legal rights. The implications of the principle of normalization in the lives of people with mental handicaps, their families, and their communities over the past 20 years in North America will be emphasized.
HSER 192 3 credits
Supporting Skill Development
(formerly SSSW 192)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 120, HSER 190
Pre- or corequisite(s): SOWK 225 or Psyc 250
This course provides an overview of information related to teaching students with special needs in today’s classroom, with particular emphasis on the concept of inclusive education. Information presented related to students’ learning and behavioural characteristics with an emphasis on the teaching-learning process which greatly influences the quantity and quality of learning.
HSER 195 3 credits
Relationships and the Community
(formerly SSSW 195)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 190
This course will provide you with clear insight and understanding into the critical issue of relationships with and of people with disabilities. It will offer a challenging look at individual values and belief systems, and provide you with strategies for creating and maintaining supportive and value-enhancing relationships. The impact of critical issues such as segregation, institutionalization, deinstitutionalization, family support, friendships, intimacy and sexual relationships, leisure and recreational opportunities, with an emphasis of community participation, will be examined.
HSER 196 3 credits
Personal Care for the Handicapped
(formerly SSSW 196)
Pre- or corequisite(s): HSER 190 or permission of the department chair
This practical course provides the prospective worker with a fundamental overview of techniques involved in providing personal care, safety and comfort to people with multiple disabilities. The role of the community support worker in relation to the particular responsibilities of other health care professionals will be examined.
HSER 200 3 credits
Counselling Skills
(formerly SSSW 200)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 120, 150 desirable
This course is designed to train students to develop their basic helping skills. Students will be expected to develop beginning competencies in a person-centered model of helping. Students will be expected to discuss and share real experiences.
HSER 229 1 credit
Seminar
(formerly SSSW 229)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 129 and 130
The practicum seminar aims to prepare students for the upcoming practicum. The seminar will introduce you to various methods of field work, field-work opportunities in the community, and relevant information required for selecting and beginning a social service practicum. In a social services practicum, the student is matched with an experienced supervisor in the field who shares expertise and acts as a role model. This course should be taken during the last year in the program.
HSER 230 6 credits
Fieldwork Practicum
(formerly SSSW 230)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 130, 150, and HSER 229 (in the previous semester) or instructor’s permission
Corequisite(s): CMNS 250 and HSER 200
Supervised work experience in a social service agency. The goals and objectives of this course will be similar to the first-year practicum. However, higher levels of skill performance are required. This course is to be taken during the final semester of the program.
HSER 261 3 credits
Social Policy and Issues on Aging
(formerly SSSW 261)
Prerequisite(s): SOWK 110
This course will explore Canadian social policy on aging, both on a federal and provincial level. Topics include the impact of the social security system, mandatory retirement, the economic situation of the elderly, and other income maintenance schemes. Also included are a survey of services available for the aging population as well as social attitudes towards aging.
HSER 264 3 credits
Workshop Series in Aging — Current Developments in Caring for the Elderly
(formerly SSSW 264)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will consist of a group of 10 to 14 different workshops presented by experts in the field. Topics will vary from year to year and students should consult the Director for an exact list.
HSER 283 3 credits
Family Dynamics
(formerly SSSW 283)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 120
This course will introduce you to the concept of family in the Canadian context. It will provide an overview of the various theoretical viewpoints in conceptualizing the family, and then examine various theoretical approaches to working with families. In this context, the family as an emotional system will be examined. This will include boundary issues, alliances, triangles and genograms, differentiation, and communication patterns, in an effort to understand family functioning. Special topics will also be examined and discussed. These will include areas such as families from a multicultural perspective, family violence, spousal assault and sexual abuse, parenting, daycare, family law, gender issues, and families and poverty.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both HSER 283 and Soc 331.
HSER 290 3 credits
Directed Studies in Social Service Work
(formerly SSSW 290)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Social Services department
This course will appeal to students whose particular area of interest cannot be met through existing courses.
HSER 292 3 credits
Comparative Delivery Systems
(formerly SSSW 292)
Prerequisite(s): SOWK 110 and instructor’s permission
This course will expose students to the social service delivery system in another province and/or country.
HSER 400 2 credits
Counselling Skills for Addictions Work
(formerly SSSW 600)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Substance Abuse Counselling program or permission of the Director
Corequisite(s): HSER 410 or SOWK 394; and HSER 427
This experientially based course will help the counsellor focus in on developing strategies for working with clients who use/misuse psychoactive drugs. Skills to be developed include establishing rapport with clients, challenging clients, working through defenses, change processes, setting goals with clients, exploring issues, and approaches to working with clients from culturally and socially diverse populations. Supportive counselling techniques will be practised. The use of written records in the counselling process will be explored and a continuing focus will be on ethical behaviour and appropriate expectations. Extensive use of videotape practice will be made.
HSER 401 2 credits
Group Facilitation Skills for Addictions
(formerly HSER 401A & B and SSSW 601A)
Pre- or corequisite(s): HSER 400 and HSER 427
This course will assist the counsellor to develop group process and leadership skills in a variety of addictions settings, which may be therapeutic, educational, or social in nature, with a particular focus on the facilitation of psycho-educational groups in chemical dependency treatment. To work effectively with groups, it is important to incorporate the needs of the individual group members and systems when planning and implementing groups. Students will learn to facilitate groups and foster a climate of mutual respect and group acceptance, while using the group as a vehicle to assist members to learn appropriate group and individual skills.
HSER 402 2 credits
Family Work in Addictions
(formerly SSSW 602)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 400 and either HSER 410 or SOWK 394
Corequisite(s): HSER 428
This course will provide addictions workers with an appreciation for the theory and practice of family work from a general systems perspective. This course will examine various approaches to working with families, the diversity of family structure, misconceptions about family work, the family as an emotional system, the importance of family of origin, and the construction and use of family genograms in working with and understanding family functioning.
HSER 410 2 credits
The Nature of Substance Abuse
(formerly SSSW 610)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Substance Abuse program or permission of Director
Pre- or corequisite(s): HSER 400, HSER 427
This course will provide a balanced overview of the nature of substance use/misuse. Issues to be examined will include the concept of chemical dependency; reasons for drug and alcohol misuse; patterns of use; individual, social, familial, and psychological consequences; treatment approaches, prevention; needs of special populations; and workplace issues. Current beliefs, myths, and scientific evidence from an international perspective will be reviewed. The unique interdisciplinary composition of the students will be used as a guiding principle in the investigation of the complex issues to be discussed.
HSER 411 2 credits
Pharmacology and Psychobiology of Addictions
(formerly HSER 411A and B and SSSW 611A)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 410 or SOWK 394
Corequisite(s): HSER 428
Students will acquire accurate information about mood-altering chemicals, their primary effect on the central nervous system, how they change mood and behaviour, and how they contribute to substance (mis) use problems. The mechanism of action, benefits, risks, side effects, toxicity, and psychosocial consequences of mood-altering chemicals will be examined.
HSER 412 2 credits
Community Treatment: Assessment and Referral
(formerly SSSW 612)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 410 or SOWK 394
This course will focus on the treatment options available for substance use/misuse in the local and provincial communities. Treatment options (inpatient, outpatient, supportive recovery, detox)and the system of care will be examined. The role of mutual help groups in treatment as well as the support systems available for family members will be examined. The complex interaction of mental health and substance use will be identified. Services beyond the system of care will be identified and their role in addressing addiction issues examined. Students will develop skills in assessment for treatment matching, treatment referrals, as well as in case management. Gaps in treatment services will be explored.
HSER 427 1.5 credits
Integrative and Self-Care Seminars
(formerly SSSW 627)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the Substance Abuse Counselling program or permission of department chair
This is an integrative and self-care seminar as ultimately, what the counsellor has is the “use of self”. The course meets once a week during the semester and is required of all students registered in HSER 400, 401, and 402. Topics to be explored will include: ethics, boundaries, stress, cross-disciplinary teams, legal issues, information sharing, and working with people with HIV/AIDS. Personal strengths and biases that may augment or interfere with client service will be discussed. Certification, licensure, and professional affiliations will be discussed. In HSER 428, the use of clinical supervision in addressing counsellor efficacy will be explored.
HSER 428 1.5 credits
Integrative and Self-Care Seminars
(formerly SSSW 628)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 427
For course description, see HSER 427.
HSER 430 6 credits
Substance Abuse Practicum
Prerequisite(s): HSER 400, HSER 401, HSER 427; and either HSER 410 or SOWK 394
Corequisite(s): HSER 428; and HSER 411 or Psyc 383
This 200 hour practicum will provide an opportunity for the participant to develop their individual, group, and/or family treatment skills in the addictions field. Working in either one or two agencies (as determined by the Director), Students will be expected to contract for their own learning objectives. Student evaluation will be made by both the agency and college supervisor and be based on actual observation of the student. Diploma students will begin the practicum in January of their last year in the program, while certificate students will not start their practicum until March of the last year and are encouraged to consider starting their practicum only after completing all the course work.
Indo Canadian Studies
INCS 392 3 credits
Immigration & Social Integration: The Indo-Canadian Experience
Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including Soc 101
This course focuses on the lived experience of Indo Canadians to explore the context of cultural transfer for immigrants from the Indian Subcontinent. A century of cultural adjustment and integration will be explored in the context of cross cultural relations and conflict. Students will examine the use of social services (in its broadest definition) by the Indo Canadian community. Integration into the social, educational, cultural, and economic areas will also be explored. Intergenerational conflict will be discussed as well as the experience of 2nd and 3rd generation individuals.
Japanese
JAPN 101 3 credits
Japanese Language I
Prerequisite(s): None
This course, designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Japanese, offers a comprehensive introduction to modern Japanese, through the study of vocabulary, grammar and culture. The course will include an intensive study of the Japanese writing systems (Hiragana, Katakana). Through the use of various communicative techniques, we teach you to speak, understand, read and write Japanese. There is extensive use of the multi-media laboratory.
JAPN 102 3 credits
Japanese Language II
Prerequisite(s): Japanese 101
This course, designed for students who have completed Japanese 101 or the equivalent, continues to develop your ability to speak, understand, read and write Japanese by focusing on vocabulary, grammar and culture as well as the Japanese writing systems. There is extensive use of the multi-media laboratory.
JAPN 201 3 credits
Intermediate Japanese I
Prerequisite(s): Japn 102 or equivalent
This course is designed for students who have prior knowledge of the Japanese language, mainly through Basic Japanese I and II, or equivalent courses. The objectives of the course are to advance students’ fluency as well as accuracy in speech and listening comprehension, to develop students’ reading and writing skills, and to increase their understanding of modern Japanese culture through authentic materials.
JAPN 202 3 credits
Intermediate Japanese II
Prerequisite(s): Japn 201
This course is designed for students who have completed intermediate Japanese I or equivalent courses. The objectives of the course are to advance students’ fluency as well as accuracy in speech and listening comprehension, to develop students’ reading and writing skills, and to increase their understanding of modern Japanese culture through authentic materials. Students will develop the skills to use Japanese in both social and workplace situations.
Kinesiology and Physical Education
Note: Transferability information is available online by viewing the B.C. transfer guide at www.bccat.bc.ca.
Note: 300- and 400-level courses may not be available every year. For transferability of upper-level courses, please
check with the institution you wish to attend.
KPE 103 3 credits
Active Health
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces students to the concept of active living and healthy lifestyles. Components of fitness and basic training principles are introduced to help students understand how to improve physical fitness and overall health. The role of physical activity in relation to cardiovascular health and other chronic diseases is discussed along with the other healthy lifestyle habits such as eating well and not smoking.
KPE 130 3 credits
Introduction to Adventure Tourism
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Adventure Tourism certificate program
This course is an introduction to the critical role tourism plays in British Columbia. Students will be provided with an overview of the tourism industry, with a primary focus on adventure tourism. Students will examine the interrelationships between the eight sectors of the tourism industry, and study the economic, environmental, and social impact of tourism.
KPE 131 3 credits
Land-Based Recreation
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Adventure Tourism program
This course will move in a progression through all the skills necessary to travel safely by means of mountain bike. Interpersonal skills as well as bike handling skills will be developed in a sequential manner. Upon completion of this course, students will be well versed in travelling independently and safely in a variety of terrain features. Preparation will include: development of planning skills for leading a group, selecting appropriate equipment and making necessary adjustments for an individual rider, learning skills to maintain and repair a bike, as well as make necessary repairs on the trail, basic first aid training, trip preparation skills, developing risk assessment and emergency plans, self-assessment skills and group management skills.
KPE 132A 1.5 credits
Introduction to Mountaineering
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Adventure Tourism program
This course will provide students with an introduction to basic mountaineering skills. Topics will include essential skills for travel in mountainous terrain, as well as rescue techniques and environmental ethics.
KPE 132B 1.5 credits
Introduction to Winter Mountaineering
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Adventure Tourism program
This course will provide students with an introduction to basic winter mountaineering skills. Topics will include essential techniques for winter travel in mountainous regions, as well as rescue techniques and environmental ethics.
KPE 133A 1.5 credits
Introduction to Flatwater Paddling
Prerequisite(s): KPE 131 and KPE 132a
This course introduces students to lake water paddling skills. The course provides the foundational skills necessary for more advanced paddling pursuits. Upon completion of the course, students will have been given instruction on tandem and solo travel using canoes as the primary means of travel. This course will also introduce students to safety considerations as well as various rescue techniques applicable to lake or flat water environments.
KPE 133B 1.5 credits
Water-Based Recreation: Introduction to Ocean Kayaking
Prerequisite(s): KPE 133a
This course will introduce students to ocean kayaking through a combination of theoretical and practical applications. Students will learn the basic skills necessary to travel safely in a marine environment. Topics will include paddling skills, navigation, safety procedures, environmental ethics and trip preparation skills.
KPE 155 3 credits
Work Experience I
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of four courses in the Fitness and Exercise Management program, which must include KPE 103 and KPE 170
Corequisite(s): KPE 180
This is a placement which provides students with 120 hours of practical work experience. Students will have the opportunity to practise skills gained in prerequisite courses and will receive feedback concerning their competencies. Successful completion of the practicum work experience is required for completion of the certificate program.
KPE 160 3 credits
Active Health (Contemporary Health Issues)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will introduce students to issues such as physical fitness, stress management, nutrition, weight management, illness and disease, substance abuse, and personal safety. Upon successful completion, students will be prepared to make informed decisions that affect personal well-being.
KPE 161 3 credits
Introduction to Kinesiology
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will provide students with an introduction to the field of kinesiology, focusing on the historical and philosophical perspectives of the field.
KPE 163 4 credits
Biodynamics of Physical Activity
Prerequisite(s): None, however KPE 103, KPE 170, and Bio 111/112 recommended
Students will acquire knowledge of the mechanical, anatomical, and physiological aspects of human movement and performance.
KPE 170 4 credits
Basic Human Anatomy
(formerly KPE 190)
Prerequisite(s): None
Students will be introduced to human anatomy with particular emphasis on human movement. Lectures focus on the basic structure and function of the majority of the body’s organ systems, while the labs focus principally on human anatomy.
Note: Only one of KPE 170 or KPE 190 can be taken for credit.
KPE 180 3 credits
Fitness Testing and Exercise Prescription
Prerequisite(s): KPE 160, KPE 190
This course allows students to develop a theoretical knowledge base in fitness testing and exercise prescription. Throughout the course students will develop skills necessary to perform the Canadian Standardized Test of Fitness, and be introduced to the interpretation of fitness testing results and exercise prescription methodologies.
KPE 181 3 credits
Exercise Guidelines and Stress Management
Pre- or corequisite(s): KPE 180
This course an extension of Fitness Testing/Exercise Prescription (KPE 180), introduces students to several scenarios representing common client concerns when initiating an exercise program. This course details guidelines for exercise prescription using case studies, introduces the scientific methods of determining exercise workloads, addresses many specific programming concerns, and reviews stress management techniques and practices. Factors affecting exercise program adherence are discussed and considered in exercise program planning.
KPE 215 3 credits
Introduction to Biomechanics
Prerequisite(s): KPE 163 or KPE 170; Bio 111/112 and Phys 101 recommended. (Effective September 2006, KPE 163 will no longer meet the prerequisites for this course.)
This course will introduce students to the fundamental laws of mechanics as they apply to human motor performance. Musculoskeletal structure and function, linear and angular kinematics, and fluid mechanics are applied to gain a greater understanding of human movement. Skill analysis, error detection, error correction, and the application of sport science principles within individual sport performance will also be examined.
KPE 220 3 credits
Teaching Dance & Gymnastics
(formerly KPE 420)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will provide the student with an understanding of developing curriculum and designing instruction for implementing dance and gymnastics programs in the K-12 educational system. Active participation is required.
KPE 260 3 credits
Topics in Human Nutrition
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is an introduction to the principles of human nutrition with an emphasis on topics of current interest. Students will gain an understanding of the scientific function that certain nutrients and eating habits play in maintaining good health. We will discuss nutritional issues in Canadian context and develop the ability to discriminate between reliable and unreliable nutritional information. Nutrition for an active lifestyle is also addressed.
KPE 261 3 credits
Sociocultural Aspects of Physical Activity and Sport
Prerequisite(s): KPE 161
The intent of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to learn about the sociological and cultural aspects of physical activity and sport. A combination of literature review and discussion as well as hands-on experience in collecting and analyzing data will provide students with a broad understanding of social settings and cultural issues as they relate to sport and physical activity.
KPE 266 3 credits
Exercise and Sport Psychology
Prerequisite(s): 30 credits university-level courses completed
The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and latest empirical research concerning the cognitive processes and emotional states that regulate and influence performance in sports, exercise, and other physical activities.
KPE 268 3 credits
Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
(formerly KPE 164)
Prerequisite(s): 30 university-level credits
This course will introduce students to the basic principles underlying, and the variables that impact, the process by which humans acquire motor skills. Included will be a consideration of the psychological foundations and developmental issues that interact with our ability to acquire skilled behaviour.
Note: only one of KPE 164 or 268 can be taken for credit.
KPE 270 4 credits
Human Physiology I
(formerly KPE 290)
Prerequisite(s): KPE 170, or Bio 111/112, and 30 credits university-level courses
This course will examine the structure and function of systems involved in the control and execution of human movement, including a detailed examination of histology, the integumentary system, the musculoskeletal system, and the integration and control systems (nervous and endocrine). Labs will focus on organ system physiology.
KPE 315 4 credits
Advanced Biomechanics
Prerequisite(s): KPE 215; acceptance to the Bachelor of Kinesiology with a minimum 60 credits completed
Corequisite(s): None
This course builds on knowledge gained in KPE 215 to analyze human movement, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Students will complete and present a project that focuses on chosen athletic performance. This involves computer-assisted video analysis of performance models and quantitative measurement and analysis. Lectures will present mathematical models and also introduce you to other contemporary issues such as analysis of specific sport performance.
KPE 333 3 credits
Occupational Health and Safety
Prerequisite(s): KPE 270, KPE 370
This course explores Canadian occupational health and safety legislation, including safety policy, worker’s compensation, and principles of loss management. Relevant information concerning the management of an occupational health and safety program will be discussed including a discussion concerning risk, acceptable risk, liability, risk management, and fault free analysis.
KPE 350 3 credits
Stress and Chronic Disease
Prerequisite(s): KPE 160 and KPE 270
This course will provide the student with knowledge of the interrelationship between stress and chronic disease. Throughout the course, focus will be on understanding some of the diseases that are affected by chronic stress. A secondary focus will examine possible methods of coping with such severe and disabling diseases to minimize the levels of stress exhibited by the individual.
KPE 360 3 credits
Concepts in Health Promotion and Health Education
Prerequisite(s): KPE 160
This course introduces students to the basic principles of health promotion and health education. An historical approach to the topic in Canada is followed to show how and why health promotion and health education are primary focuses in health care today. Topics such as epidemiology, traditional medicine, treatment, and prevention are discussed in relation to health education and health promotion to show how they must work together. Theories of health behaviour change are introduced. The roles of the government, local/national/international health services, and education organizations in health promotion are addressed and examples of programs provided.
KPE 362 3 credits
Theoretical Exercise Physiology
Prerequisite(s): KPE 163, KPE 270; KPE 370 recommended
This course discusses the physiological response to exercise, examining both the acute and chronic adaptations to an exercise stress. Discussed from a physiological systems perspective, this course will examine the functional capacity of individual physiological systems discussing the system’s response to submaximal and maximal exercise and its impact on human performance. The environmental impact on physical performance will also be discussed.
KPE 363 3 credits
Lab-Based Exercise Physiology
Prerequisite(s): KPE 362
This is a lab-based course dealing with laboratory-based measurement of the functional capacity of the various physiological systems, including the muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems.
KPE 365 3 credits
Physical Growth and Motor Development
(formerly KPE 265)
Prerequisite(s): KPE 163 or KPE 170 or Bio 111/112. (Effective September 2006, KPE 163 will no longer meet the prerequisites for this course.)
This course will provide an overview of the impact that growth and maturation have on the development of motor skills from conception through to old age. Particular emphasis will be given to the Grades K-12 years and the effect of growth and maturation on physiological and psychological functioning of the maturing organism.
Note: Only one of KPE 165, 265, or 365 can be taken for credit.
KPE 366 3 credits
Applied Counselling Skills for Fitness Professionals
Prerequisite(s): KPE 266
This course will study the application of basic applied counselling skills used by consultants, instructors and professionals in the fitness industry. It will introduce students to various theories and methods of counselling with an emphasis placed on behavioural change models. This course will combine theory and the practical application of these theories reflecting the context of the fitness professional.
KPE 368 4 credits
Advanced Motor Learning and Control
(formerly KPE 264)
Prerequisite(s): KPE 268
An in-depth consideration of the principles of motor learning and control with applications drawn to the teaching of motor skills in physical education, sport, and other physical activity situations.
Note: Only one of KPE 264 or 368 can be taken for credit.
KPE 370 4 credits
Human Physiology II
(formerly KPE 291)
Prerequisite(s): KPE 270
This course is a continuation of KPE 270 and will examine the structure, function, and regulation of the organ systems supporting human movement (circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, and digestive) as well as the immune and reproductive systems. Labs will focus on organ system physiology.
Note: Only one of KPE 291 or 370 can be taken for credit.
KPE 371 4 credits
Intro to Athletic Injuries
(formerly KPE 271)
Prerequisite(s): KPE 170
This course is designed to introduce students to the role of the athletic trainer in the prevention, recognition and immediate care of a wide spectrum of common athletic injuries and health problems which may affect performance. In-class laboratory sessions will emphasize the principles and techniques of basic protective strapping and taping.
KPE 400 3 credits
Statistics and Research Design in Kinesiology
Prerequisite(s): 90 university-level credits completed; admission to the Bachelor of Kinesiology degree program
This course will introduce students to the basic elements of statistics and research design in kinesiology. Topics covered include the development of research proposals, writing of research reports, and the use of statistical techniques.
KPE 421 3 credits
Instructional Design and Analysis of Physical Education and Sport Programs
Prerequisite(s): KPE 268; completion of 60 credits of university level courses
This course will provide students with an understanding of developing curriculum and designing instruction for the delivery of physical education programs in the K to 12 educational system. Included will be an investigation of generic principles that govern activity in a variety of games and sports. Active participation is required.
KPE 435 3 credits
Ergonomics/Occupational Biomechanics
Prerequisite(s): KPE 315
This course explores human factors as they relate to human-machine interactions in the workplace, and includes an examination of the physical work environment, adaptation of the environment and equipment to the worker to enhance worker comfort, equipment design, and the tasks involved in an ergonomic assessment of the workplace.
KPE 450 3 credits
Research Project
Prerequisite(s): 90 University-level credits completed and written consent of faculty advisor; admission to the Bachelor of Kinesiology Degree program
Each student, with the guidance of a faculty advisor, will compete and present a self-directed research project based on the skills and knowledge obtained in the Kinesiology and Physical Education program. This course is designed to provide insight into research design and experimentation. This course may be taken in place of KPE 455 for completion of module 4 — applied Kinesiology Skills.
KPE 451 3 credits
Health Promotion and Fitness Program Planning and Evaluation
Prerequisite(s): KPE 360
This course will prepare you for planning, implementing, and evaluating health promotion/education and fitness programming in a variety of settings. Planning theories and strategies are introduced and worked through with examples from needs assessments through to evaluating the success of the program.
KPE 455 3 credits
Professional Experience in Kinesiology
Prerequisite(s): 90 university-level credits completed; admission to the Bachelor of Kinesiology degree program
This course is a professional experience tailored to the specific needs of the students. Students will develop and carry out their professional experience under the direction of a Kinesiology faculty member.
KPE 460 3 credits
Nutrition Applications: Sport and Disease
Prerequisite(s): KPE 160 and KPE 260
This course involves the application of basic human nutrition knowledge to practical situations such as eating for sport and physical activity, and eating for the prevention, management, and treatment of disease. Nutritional ergogenic aids are discussed in detail as is advanced meal planning for active individuals. The role of nutrition in specific diseases is addressed. Students will also learn how to analyze and interpret diet profiles.
KPE 462 3 credits
Advanced Fitness Testing and Exercise Prescription
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits of university level course work; KPE 362 (may be taken concurrently)
This course integrates knowledge of exercise physiology and laboratory testing techniques with the practical application of the knowledge. Specific testing procedures, analysis of results, and exercise prescription will be discussed in the areas of cardiorespiratory fitness, musculoskeletal fitness and body composition. Topics include the application of knowledge to apparently healthy individuals with lower back pain, heart disease, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, and/or arthritis, and psychological stress.
KPE 463 3 credits
Therapeutic Exercise
Prerequisite(s): KPE 362 and KPE 370; KPE 371 recommended
Corequisite(s): None
This course will examine exercise prescription for specific musculo-skeletal and metabolic disorders. Exercise prescriptions for the purpose of improving function and reducing disability will be discussed. The role of exercise therapists in the present health care model will be examined.
KPE 465 3 credits
Adapted Physical Activity
Prerequisite(s): KPE 170; KPE 365
This is an applied course focusing on the current trends in the theory and practice of adapting physical activity for individuals with mental or physical challenges. Students will be provided with the foundations and rationale for adapting physical activity, along with a survey of various disabilities and programming considerations for people with disabilities. Students will be expected to apply their knowledge in real-world settings.
KPE 466 3 credits
Psychological Skills for Sport and Life
Prerequisite(s): KPE 366 and completion of 90 university-level credits
The purpose of this course is to look at theoretical and practical aspects of peak performance, not only in sport, but in other fields. The course will sensitize you to emotional, cognitive, rational, and behavioural techniques utilized in understanding and developing advanced sport psychology techniques.
KPE 480 3 credits
Pathophysiology
Prerequisite(s): KPE 370
This course is about human pathology. It builds on knowledge learned in prerequisite anatomy and physiology courses to give the student a fundamental understanding of disease, allowing theoretical and practical applications. Both general and organ system pathologies are investigated using a progressive DEPPICT model: definition (and diagnosis), etiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, and treatment (or prognosis).
Latin American Studies
Additional credits in Latin American Studies
The following SCMS courses can be used as upper-level LAS credit. Course descriptions are found under Social, Cultural, and Media Studies beginning on page 333.
SCMS 310 — Special Topics: Regional Studies in Latin America
• SCMS 363 — Processes of Development and Under-Development in Latin America
• SCMS 388 — Comparative Studies of Minority Indigenous Peoples
• SCMS 440A — Religion in Latin America
• SCMS 463 — Special Topics in Development Studies
• SCMS 470A — Latin American Immigrants and Immigration
LAS 100 3 credits
Images of Latin America
Prerequisite(s): None
Using Latin America as a case study, LAS 100 offers students the opportunity to examine the images of the “underdeveloped” world that we encounter in the mass media on a daily basis. We will concentrate on the images found in the media of television, radio and print journalism, but will also pay attention to those images that have come to us through film. Thus, students will “experience” Latin America through its images, but will be encouraged to analyze what exactly it is that is being “experienced.” In doing this, we will be following current events in Latin America, and be making a critical, on-going assessment of coverage of those events in the mass media. The result is an effective introduction to the human condition and culture of our Latin American neighbours, and a critical glimpse at the limitations inherent in our view of that part of the world.
LAS 102 3 credits
Latin American Study Tour
Prerequisite(s): None
This course offers students an introduction to a specific Latin American nation by means of a study tour. It is a one-semester course of independent study with a 3-4 week study tour experience. The field experience will be augmented by lecture and discussion. Independent study prior to leaving and upon return to B.C. will help to create an exciting learning experience for all involved.
LAS 110 3 credits
Pre-Columbian, Hispanic and African Heritage of Latin America
Prerequisite(s): None
This course examines the cultural heritage of Latin America, forged from the complex interaction of New World, European, and African peoples. We begin with an analysis of the Aztec and Inca states, two powerful empires that ruled large populations and extensive territories at the time of European contact in the 16th century. We then study the cultural and historical contact of Iberian expansion, Columbus’ voyage of discovery, and the Spanish invasion of the Americas. After discussing the profound impact of Spanish colonial rule on the indigenous people of the New World, we analyze the origins and development of the African slave trade and the formation of Afro-American cultures. We conclude with a discussion of the socio-cultural and political legacy of colonialism.
LAS 200 3 credits
Introduction to Latin American Social and Political Issues
Prerequisite(s): None
Latin America is a fascinating and diverse region of considerable importance to Canadians for political, commercial, and social reasons. In this course we will begin to explore key facets of life in this volatile region as we enter the 21st century. This will involve looking backward at the forces and processes that have shaped Latin American society thus far, as well as looking at the new situation most of Latin America currently finds itself in, and at its prospects for the future.
LAS 201 3 credits
Artistic Expression in Latin America
Prerequisite(s): None
From literature, music, and the visual arts to political thought and theology, Latin American culture is rich, vibrant, and exciting. This inter-disciplinary course combines the perspectives of the social sciences with art, architecture, music, literature, and film to examine the relationship between ideas and culture and the major issues found in Latin America past and present.
LAS 312 4 credits
Special Topics: Latin American Cultural Topics
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include at least three credits LAS.
A cross-disciplinary focus on specific elements of contemporary Latin American and Iberian culture. Topics such as indigenism, Afro-Latin culture, religion, literature, and folklore will be studied.
LAS 498 4 credits
Directed Readings in Latin American Studies
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least 9 credits of LAS or SCMS with Latin American content, plus permission from supervising faculty member and department head.
Directed reading in a selected field of study under the direction of a faculty member. A major paper will be required.
Library and Information Technology
LIBT 100 3 credits
Essentials of Information Service
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides instruction in some of the initial public services tasks in library work such as circulation, inter-library loans, displays and processing library materials. Library filing rules and Boolean searching are covered, and students learn to be effective searchers of library catalogues and other databases. Course content includes business procedures used in libraries, such as word processing, e-mail, and managing the telephone. Students learn how to conduct an effective employment search, and gain practice in writing resumes and covering letters. Communications and human relations in the workplace are discussed. An introduction to trouble-shooting business machines such as photocopiers and fax machines is included. Includes computer lab.
Note: This course is accepted as an elective in the UCFV Arts BA program.
LIBT 110 3 credits
Information and Society
Prerequisite(s): None
This introductory course surveys the history of books, libraries, and the management of information. Current trends and issues in the book and information industries are examined, as is the role of the paraprofessional in these industries.
Note: This course is accepted as an elective in the UCFV Arts BA program.
LIBT 115 3 credits
Library Cataloguing Techniques
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 100 (may be taken concurrently) and admission to the LIBT program
This course teaches cataloguing according to the latest edition of Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACRII), description of library materials, and MARC coding for bibliographic description of items in all formats. The course provides an introduction to Authority files, and assignment of access points, and to searching online systems for derived copy from national and other libraries. Skills learned in this course provide a basis for subsequent courses. Includes computer lab.
LIBT 120 3 credits
Library Technical Services
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 115 (may be taken concurrently)
This course examines the technical services department of the library or information centre. It covers the process of acquiring all types of materials for a library or information centre, with attention to the use of standard selection tools, bibliographic verification using electronic and paper systems, acquisitions procedures, and control of acquisitions budgets using manual and spreadsheet systems. Cataloguing skills acquired in LIBT 115 will be reinforced through practice as students follow examples through the complete range of technical services. Includes computer lab.
LIBT 130 3 credits
Library Classification Systems
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 115 (may be taken concurrently)
The two major library classification systems used in North America are studied: Library of Congress Classification System, used primarily in college and university libraries, and the Dewey Decimal Classification System, used primarily in public and school libraries.
LIBT 135 3 credits
Library Subject Access
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 115 (may be taken concurrently)
In this course, which adds subject access to catalogue records, students will learn to provide correctly formatted subject headings, using Sears List of Subject Headings for items that have been classified using the Dewey Decimal Classification System, and Library of Congress Subject Headings for items classified using Library of Congress Classification System. A study of selected thesauri from subjects such as education, psychology, and technology will form the basis for a comparison of controlled vocabulary and keyword selection as methods of locating items in an online catalogue. Students will learn to provide suitable indexes and thesaurus entries. Students will also learn the correct MARC coding for adding subject headings to an online catalogue record.
LIBT 140 3 credits
Library Public Services
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 115 (may be taken concurrently)
An introduction to working with the public in libraries and information centres. Topics include developing a philosophy of service, the variety of public services offered by different institutions, public relations, communicating effectively with patrons through the reference interview, dealing with difficult patrons, recognizing basic types of queries, recognizing when to refer patrons to professional staff or outside agencies, effective use of the library catalogue to extract information, and basic types of reference sources (primarily print) used to answer patron queries.
LIBT 145 3 credits
Internet Information Retrieval
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will be of interest to students from all disciplines. Students will become effective searchers of the internet, developing and refining search strategies to increase the relevance of the material gathered. Students learn how to evaluate the information they find, using standard criteria, and how to document electronic information sources using standard style guides. Issues such as the effect of the internet on society, scholarship, and libraries, are discussed and debated. Resources specific to different subject areas such as business, government, health, arts, humanities, and social sciences will be explored.
Note: This course is accepted as an elective in the UCFV Arts BA program.
LIBT 160 3 credits
Site Visits, Practicum
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 115, LIBT 140, and 45 LIBT program credits
Site visits are arranged for groups of students to visit libraries and/or records management areas to learn how these areas deal with their users and with the materials they manage. At the end of term, all students will work for a four-week period in a selected site, and be evaluated on their activities while performing the practicum. Every effort is made to match the interests of the student to the host site. Work in this course is evaluated as satisfactory/unsatisfactory and grades are not used in calculating grade point averages.
LIBT 210 3 credits
Database Organization of Information
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 135 (may be taken concurrently)
Students learn to create searchable databases to handle informational materials for a variety of purposes. Here they will use indexes and thesaurus entries to create access points for several informational database programs. They will learn techniques for writing abstracts, and develop simple instructions for others to use in searching their databases. Includes a computer lab.
LIBT 220 3 credits
Library Applications Software
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 120 (may be taken concurrently)
This course will include the evaluation and selection of library and information management software, its installation, set-up and use. Students will be introduced to local area networks, and will learn simple maintenance procedures. They will learn to locate reviews of software in print and online, and they will evaluate library software and write coherent reviews. They will also learn how to write procedures for other staff to follow when using library systems. Includes computer lab.
LIBT 230 3 credits
Library Services for Children
(Educ 230)
Prerequisite(s): None
Students learn to use a wide variety of children’s literature to provide programs which will help children develop a taste for and a delight in the best materials available.
Note: Students cannot take EDUC 230 for further credit.
LIBT 240 3 credits
Media in Libraries
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 115 (may be taken concurrently)
This course covers the operation and simple maintenance of audiovisual equipment, and methods of locating, evaluating, organizing and handling audiovisual materials such as audio and video cassettes, microforms, graphic materials, computer software, pamphlets, etc.
LIBT 250 3 credits
Records Management
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides an introduction to the systematic control of information in an organization. Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy legislation will provide a context for establishing a records management program in an organization. Students will learn to analyze research and conduct inventories and audits of office systems. Also included are topics such as active/inactive records, the values and life cycles of records, schedules for retention, storage, retrieval and disposal of records, commonly used classification and filing systems.
Note: This course is accepted as an elective in the UCFV Arts BA program.
LIBT 260 3 credits
Automated Records Management
Prerequisite(s): LIBT 250, CIS 100 (may be taken concurrently)
Automated systems for managing records are taught in this course, along with creation and use of forms for specific purposes in the computerized environment. Here students will be introduced to use of magnetic and optical media for records storage and retrieval and will practise written, oral, and electronic communication skills. Students will use word processing, spreadsheet and database programs for simulation of records management tasks. Items classified using ARCS/ORCS will be entered into a database. Includes a computer lab.
LIBT 270 3 credits
Archival Techniques
Prerequisite(s): None
In this course, students will study the relationship between records management procedures and archival techniques. They will examine the field of archives, and recognize its national and local associations and organizations. The course will deal with the process of appraising and selecting items for archival retention, and will introduce simple conservation techniques, safe storage methods, and the concepts of original order and provenance. Students will develop methods of providing indexes, finding aids and security for archival collections. Includes a computer lab.
Note: This course is accepted as an elective in the UCFV Arts BA program.
LIBT 280 3 credits
Special Topics in Information Work
Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission
LIBT 280 is offered on an occasional basis, to provide enrichment in an emerging area of study. It will be offered to both students and people from the information world who wish to study a topic under the direction of UCFV’s LIBT program.
Linguistics
LING 101 3 credits
Introduction to Language
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to various areas of linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, etc. A look at language as overlapping systems of rule-governed features.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Linguistics 101 and SLA 209.
LING 110 3 credits
Introduction to Phonetics
Prerequisite(s): Ling 101 recommended
This course is a practical introduction to human speech sounds. The student will learn to recognize, analyze and describe, symbolize using the IPA and other phonetic alphabets, and produce the speech sounds of a great many world languages. The course will include segmental sounds, tone, intonation, stress, and duration.
LING 202 3 credits
Language Acquisition
Prerequisite(s): Ling 101
Linguistics 202 looks at theories of child language acquisition and adult second language learning. The course provides an overview of the complex performative knowledge any speaker of a language must possess. The overlapping systems of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics of English, as well as theories of child language acquisition and second language learning are reviewed.
Mandarin
MAND 101 3 credits
Introduction to Mandarin I
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces students to the basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese, and to Chinese culture.
MAND 102 3 credits
Introduction to Mandarin II
Prerequisite(s): MAND 101 or instructor’s permission
Students will build on basic skills acquired in Mandarin 101 and continue to develop oral, listening, reading, and writing skills and to further explore Chinese culture.
MAND 201 3 credits
Intermediate Mandarin I
Prerequisite(s): Mand 102
This course is a continuation of Mand 102. Students will practice and enhance all four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing developed in Mand 102 and will acquire additional grammatical structures and vocabulary for achieving intermediate proficiency in conversation, reading, writing and translation as well as further understanding of the Chinese culture and customs. Composition in Mandarin is introduced. At the end of Mand 201, the student is expected to be able to use all the basic sentence patterns in modern Mandarin and to know about 1000 — 1200 Mandarin words.
MAND 202 3 credits
Intermediate Mandarin II
Prerequisite(s): Mand 201
This course is a continuation of Mand 201 with emphasis on practising and enhancing the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing developed in Mand 201. Through the course, students will acquire additional grammatical structures and vocabulary for achieving intermediate proficiency in conversation, reading, writing, and translation, obtain further understanding of the Chinese culture and customs, and learn approximately 200-300 new words. Composition in Chinese will be strengthened.
Mathematics
Notes on prerequisites:
Unless stated otherwise, the minimum grade acceptable in all course prerequisites is a C-. In exceptional cases, course prerequisites may be waived by an instructor. Students will need the instructor’s written permission for waiver of a prerequisite.
If, for any student, more than three calendar years have elapsed since credit was obtained for any course prerequisite, the student concerned should contact the course instructor for further instructions before the course begins. A preliminary assessment test may have to be passed to satisfy the prerequisite.
Students wishing to enroll in Math 085, 094, 095 must write a Math Placement test.  All other students applying for Math courses below the 100 level must write a CCP assessment.  For Math placement test information refer to page 20.  For CCP assessment information refer to page 96
The department will consider exceptional students for advanced standing into certain mathematics courses. See Advanced Standing on page 28.
Note: The required grade in all Grade 12 prerequisites must include the provincial exam component.
Math Centre
UCFV is committed to helping students succeed in their study of mathematics. The Math Centres in Abbotsford and Chilliwack are open at various times throughout the week, Monday to Friday. Students are encouraged to come to the centres for help with math questions. Videos are available for courses below the 100-level; cassette tapes are available for introductory statistics; and computer software, including versions of MAPLE and MINITAB, is available on centre computers for student use. Students may also sign out math books to supplement their course work.
MATH 051 4 credits
Fundamental Mathematics I
Prerequisite(s): Individual CCP assessment and permission of the CCP department
This is a beginning mathematics course which provides instruction in whole numbers (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division), as well as decimals and fractions. Estimation and problem solving are also part of the course. Student learning issues such as “math anxiety” are addressed through individual attention and a variety of instructional approaches. Tutors may be available to help students.
MATH 061 4 credits
Fundamental Mathematics II
Prerequisite(s): Math 051 or individual CCP assessment, and CCP department permission
This is a basic mathematics course which provides instruction in decimals, fractions, proportion, percent, and measurement, as well as an introduction to algebra and geometry. Estimation and problem solving are also part of the course. Student learning issues such as “math anxiety” are addressed through individual attention and a variety of instructional approaches. Students will gain the knowledge and skills to be successful at intermediate mathematics.
MATH 071 4 credits
Intermediate Business Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): Math 061 or individual assessment by CCP department
This course consists of a brief review of basic mathematics followed by the metric system, ratio and proportion, percent, statistics, positive and negative numbers, expressions and equations, percentage applications, calculating interest, perimeter, area, Pythagorean rule, and complex word problems.
MATH 072 4 credits
Intermediate Algebraic Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): Math 061 or individual CCP assessment, and CCP department permission
The course assumes a basic proficiency in arithmetic operations and briefly reviews fractions, decimals, ratio, proportion, percent, and the metric system. The major purpose of the course is to prepare students to take advanced-level mathematics. Topics include integers, primes and factors; perimeter, area, and volume; formulas, algebraic equations and expressions; coordinate and statistical graphs; powers, roots, and scientific notation. The course also introduces polynomials and right angle trigonometry.
The goal of Intermediate Mathematics is to enable adult learners to acquire mathematical knowledge and skills, and strategies needed to enter appropriate higher level course, or to satisfy personal or career goals.
MATH 084 4 credits
Introductory Algebra and Trigonometry
Prerequisite(s): Math 072, or demonstration of entry-level knowledge and skills on the CCP assessment or the UCFV Math Placement Test; and CCP department permission
MATH 084 reviews operations with real numbers and the solution of linear equations. It introduces linear inequalities; the solution of quadratic, rational, and radical equations; operations with polynomial, rational and radical expressions; and the graphing of equations, particularly linear equations. It also reviews basic geometry concepts such as congruency and similarity needed for the study of right angle trigonometry. Right angle trigonometry is used to solve practical problems. MATH 084 is intended for students who need to gain or refresh knowledge and skills to ensure success at Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (Math 085).Math 084 may be used as a math credit for the CCP Advanced Level certificate or the Provincial Adult Dogwood. It can also be used as preparation for some vocational, career, and technical programs. For academic programs, students must complete Math 085.
MATH 085 4 credits
Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry
Prerequisite(s): At least a C in Math 084 or demonstration of entry-level knowledge and skills on the UCFV Math Placement Test; and CCP department permission
Math 085 reviews basic algebraic concepts and skills, including linear functions. Absolute value, polynomial, rational, radical, and quadratic expressions, equations, and functions are studied in detail. Students will use function notation and graph relations and functions. The course reviews right-angle trigonometry and introduces the laws of sines and cosines to solve non-right triangles, with an emphasis on solving practical problems.
Math 085 is intended to provide the background necessary for success at college level mathematics (MATH 094/095). As a prerequisite for entry into many college and university programs, Math 085 serves as an equivalent to Principles or Applications of Math 11.
MATH 094 4 credits
Introduction to College Math I
Prerequisite(s): Principles of Math 12 or at least a C in one of the following: Principles of Math 11, Math 085, Applications of Math 12.
Note: All students, except those who have completed MATH 085 or Principles of Math 12 (provincially examined), are required to write the Math Placement Test.
This course, followed by Math 095, is recommended for students intending to major in a science, engineering, or technology program who do not have the required Grade 12 (Math) prerequisites. Math 094 and Math 095 are together equivalent to provincial Mathematics 12 and they provide the foundation for calculus courses.
Topics include manipulation of algebraic expressions; zeroes of quadratic and polynomial functions; equations involving rational exponents, radicals, rational functions and absolute values. Functions are studied, with emphasis on notation, graphing, transformations, inverses and compositions. Practical applications include optimization, motion, and area problems. Nonlinear systems and complex numbers are included.
MATH 095 4 credits
Introduction to College Math II
Prerequisite(s): Math 094 with at least a C
Math 094 and Math 095 are together equivalent to provincial Math 12. In MATH 095 the students examine logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, and geometric and arithmetic sequences and series. Additional topics covered as time allows include the binomial theorem, matrices, and vectors.
MATH 100 1 credit
Supplement to Calculus
Corequisite(s): Enrollment in Math 111 or Math 115
This half-semester optional course complements Math 111 and Math 115. It provides students with a quick and focused review of the basic mathematical skills that underlie university calculus. Topics will include functions and graphing, algebra, exponents, factoring polynomials, and solving equations. Students who need this course may identify themselves or may be encouraged to enroll in this course after their first test in Math 111 or Math 115. Students should check with their advisors as to whether this course counts toward their programs.
Note: Students cannot obtain credit for both Math 100 and Math 110.
MATH 104 4 credits
Introductory Statistics
Prerequisite(s): A C or better in one of the following: Math 11 (or Principles of Math 11), or Applications of Math 11, or Math 085; or 45 university-level credits with department permission.
This course is an introduction to descriptive statistics, sampling, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. It provides an intuitive approach to why and when the procedures may be used, without involving mathematical proofs.
This course is recommended for anyone who wishes to develop the ability to intelligently evaluate published statistical data, and for students of arts, criminal justice, education, and social science in particular.
As a general rule, students with Math 11 are expected to take Math 104, those with Math 12 are expected to take Math 106, and those with a full year of calculus are expected to take Math 270. Students should check program requirements.
Students with credit for Math 106 or Math 270 are not allowed to take Math 104. Students with Math 104 may subsequently take Math 270 in order to satisfy the requirements for a math degree.
MATH 105 4 credits
Math for the Elementary School Teacher
Prerequisite(s): Principles of Math 11 with at least a C, or Math 085 with at least a C, or Applications of Math 11 with at least a C+
It has been recognized by various study groups that if teachers are not at ease with mathematics, their resulting fears and prejudices are communicated to the students. This course is designed to provide a direct experience of mathematics and to allow the students to explore their reasoning strategies and gain greater confidence in their mathematical abilities. Understanding of the pertinent subject material is essential to effective teaching. It must be stressed that Math 105 is a mathematics course aimed at developing mathematical ability and is not a course in the methods of teaching. Topics include strategies in problem solving, sets and their applications, numeration systems, properties of real numbers and their subsets, number theory and plane geometry.
MATH 106 4 credits
Statistics I
Prerequisite(s): A recent Principles of Math 12 (provincially examined), or Math 094 and 095 with a C or better, or Applications of Math 12 with a C or better, or Math 110
This course is an introduction to descriptive statistics, sampling, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. This course is similar to Math 104, but includes multiple regression, one-way ANOVA, and a more detailed discussion of probability results. Facility with Grade 12 level algebra is expected, but no calculus is required.
As a general rule, students with Math 11 are expected to take Math 104, those with Math 12 are expected to take Math 106, and those with a full year of calculus are expected to take Math 270.
Before registering, students should check the requirements of their program. UCFV mathematics degrees require Math 270. While Math 106 is not equivalent to Math 270, students with credit for Math 270 are not allowed to take Math 106. Those with credit for Math 106 may subsequently take Math 270 in order to satisfy the requirements for a math degree.
MATH 108 3 credits
Statistics for Nursing Research
Prerequisite(s): Entry into the Nursing degree program, or permission of the Nursing Department
The emphasis of this course is on the understanding of nursing research papers. Topics include: types of data and corresponding graphical and summary description; methods of sampling from finite populations; two-way tables and independence; sensitivity and specificity; prevalence and incidence; the normal distribution; regression and correlation; measure of association; sampling proportions and rates; Pearson’s chi-square; hypotheses and confidence intervals; multiple regression, validity and reliability; and experimental versus observational data. Students will use computer software, such as Minitab, or a spreadsheet.
Note: It is not intended to fulfil a statistics requirement for any program other than Nursing.
MATH 110 4 credits
Pre-Calculus Math
Prerequisite(s): A recent Principles of Math 12 (provincially examined); or UCFV MATH 094 and 095 with a C- or better, or Applications of Math 12 with at least a C+; or a score of at least 55% on the MDPT.
This course is required for students who intend to study calculus and who have not obtained a mark of at least a B in Principles of Math 12 or equivalent.
Math 110 is intended to give students an opportunity to develop the mathematics they have seen in high school and progress into a successful completion of first-year calculus. In particular, it is meant to help students strengthen their basic algebraic skills, to re-examine functions including rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse functions, and to provide a general introduction to the instantaneous rate of change as studied in calculus. Practical applications are emphasized. As the use of technology can greatly facilitate the study of mathematics, students will require a graphing calculator.
Students may receive credit for only one of Math 094/095 or Math 110.
MATH 111 4 credits
Calculus I
Prerequisite(s): Principles of Math 12 with B or higher (provincially examined); or UCFV MATH 094/095 with B average or higher, or MATH 110 with C+ or higher; or a score of at least 70% on the MDPT
The study of calculus represents a major step in your education. Mathematics, previous to this subject, dealt with the description of static phenomena. During the latter part of the 17th century, a mathematical description was developed to describe and predict changing phenomena. This mathematics of change is now called calculus.
Topics include limits, derivatives, applications of derivatives such as analysis of function behaviour, optimization and related rates; antidifferentiation, polar coordinates and parametric functions.
Students may receive credit for only one of Math 111 or Math 115.
MATH 112 4 credits
Calculus II
Prerequisite(s): Math 111 with a C or better
Calculus I is concerned with finding the characteristics of change of a given quantity. In Calculus II, we examine the change in the reverse: if we know the way a quantity changes, can we determine what the quantity is?
Topics include techniques of integration; application of the definite integral to various problems such as areas, volumes, fluid pressure and population growth; improper integrals and their applications; an introduction to differential equations; polynomial approximations to functions; and sequences and series.
Students may receive credit for only one of MATH 112 and MATH 116.
MATH 115 4 credits
Differential and Integral Calculus I
Prerequisite(s): Principles of Math 12 with a C+ or higher (provincially examined), or Math 094 and Math 095 with an average of C+ or higher, or Math 110 with a C+ or higher or a score of at least 63% on the MDPT.
This calculus stream (Math 115/116) is recommended for students of Business Management, Biological Sciences, and Computer Information Systems. (Please see transfer guide for transferability to other universities.) This course is based on modeling real data with piecewise continuous models. The current and future behaviour of the model is analysed using the techniques of differential calculus of one variable, including optimization and curvature analysis, and the results are interpreted in real-life terms. Also included in the course are integral calculus of one variable topics: finding the total accumulation of change, Riemann Sums, the Fundamental Theorem, finding antiderivatives, applications involving finding a model from rate of change data, measuring the effects of change, and very simple differential equations.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for more than one of Math 111 or Math 115.
MATH 116 4 credits
Calculus II for Business, Biology and CIS
Prerequisite(s): Math 115 with a C or better
This calculus stream is recommended for students of Business Management, Biological Sciences and Computer Information Systems. (Please see transfer guide for transferability to other universities.) This course continues from Math 115 and relies heavily on modelling from real data. The topics include: multivariate differential calculus, differential equations, matrices, solution of simultaneous linear equations and simultaneous differential equations.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for more than one of Math 112 or Math 116.
MATH 117 3 credits
Mathematical Communication
Prerequisite(s): A C or better in BC Principles of Math 12 or equivalent; and (ESL WG64, and RV68, and S66), or (placement at the ESL 70 level and Math and Stats department permission]
This course is designed for students who have moderately strong mathematical backgrounds but whose first language is not English. It is meant to prepare such students for success in subsequent mathematics and statistics courses at UCFV by providing extensive practice in using both written and spoken English in the context of mathematical problem-solving.
Note: Students may obtain credit for only one of Math 100, Math 110, or Math 117.
MATH 125 4 credits
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): Math 110, or a C+ average or better in Math094/095, or a C+ or better in Principles of Math 12 (provincially examined), or Applications of Math 12 with at least a B
Discrete mathematics is a new and important part of mathematics, and is concerned primarily with the analysis and computational representation of ‘finite structures’. Its applications are widespread in modern technology and include scheduling, network construction, data communications, and computer engineering. This course serves as an introduction to some of the basic techniques of the discipline, including methods of counting, modular arithmetic, and formal logic. The focus of the course will be on formulating problems into mathematical models and on methods applicable to the analysis of these models.
MATH 152 4 credits
Linear Algebra for Engineering
Pre- or corequisite(s): Math 112
This course covers the solutions to linear systems of equations, vector spaces, applications to 2D and 3D geometry, linear dependence and independence, matrix algebra, determinants, orthogonal transformations and bases, application to Fourier series, eigenvalues, diagonalization, symmetric matrices, the algebra of complex numbers, the differential equations of vibrational models and linear systems of equations. This course is designed for students seeking a career in engineering. Students intending on a BSc or BA degree are recommended to take MATH 221 instead of ENGR/MATH 152.
Note: UCFV math degrees require MATH 221, not MATH 152. Credit cannot be obtained for both MATH 152 and ENGR 152. This course is also listed as ENGR 152.
MATH 205 4 credits
Math for the Elementary School Teacher II
Prerequisite(s): Math 105 with a C or better
This course will continue the aims of MATH 105 by providing a direct experience of mathematics and by encouraging students to explore reasoning strategies in solving problems appropriate to the elementary school curriculum. This course is designed to develop confidence in verbalizing mathematics to one’s peers as well as to students in an elementary classroom. Fifteen hours of elementary classroom observation is mandatory. Topics include strategies in problem solving, descriptive statistics, an introduction to probability, coordinate geometry, elementary logic, modular arithmetic, and an introduction to graph theory.
MATH 211 3 credits
Calculus III
Prerequisite(s): Math 112 with C or better, or Math 116 with C or better
This course extends the concepts of first-year calculus from the one-variable setting to a multi-variable setting. Topics include 3-dimensional analytic geometry, Euclidean spaces, partial derivatives and gradient, optimization, multiple integrals and applications.
MATH 214 3 credits
Introduction to Analysis
Prerequisite(s): Math 112 with at least a C (B recommended)
This course provides an introduction to some of the fundamental ideas of mathematical analysis, the subject that forms the rigorous foundation for calculus. It also introduces students to the concept of proof, and provides techniques for constructing and analyzing proofs. It serves as a very good preparation for upper-level mathematics courses. Topics include logical connectives and quantifiers, elementary set theory including the ideas of infinite cardinality, properties of the real numbers such as density and completeness, limits and convergence of sequences and functions, continuity, differentiability, Cauchy sequences, the Extreme and Mean Value Theorems, uniform continuity, and series convergence.
MATH 221 3 credits
Linear Algebra
Prerequisite(s): Math 112 with a C or better; or Math 116 with C+ or better
This course in linear algebra offers an introduction to the strength and flexibility of mathematics. Powerful general results are derived, and can then be applied to specific problems in areas such as physics, engineering, commerce, or chemistry. At other times, the process is reversed and particular problems are used to motivate far-reaching results. Topics include linear systems, matrix algebra, vector spaces, linear transformations and diagonalization.
MATH 225 3 credits
Topics in Discrete Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): Math 112 with a C+ or higher
This course introduces the student to some of the most useful types of combinatorial structures: graphs, trees, generating functions, and recurrence relations, all of which play an important role in the mathematics of computers and computation.
MATH 235 3 credits
Mathematical Modeling
Prerequisite(s): Math 112 or Math 116
Pre- or corequisite(s): At least one of: Math 106, Math 152, Math 211, Math 221, or Math 270
This course introduces the student to the techniques of mathematical modeling: the construction of a mathematical description of a real-world situation, and the analysis of this description. All computation will be done in a CAS (computer algebra system) environment (such as MAPLE), enabling the student to concentrate on creating and criticizing the models.
MATH 255 3 credits
Ordinary Differential Equations
Prerequisite(s): Math 112
Pre- or corequisite(s): Math 211 and one of Math 152, Math 221, Phys 221.
Most mathematical models of a physical process are in the form of differential equations. This course provides various techniques and ideas in solving ordinary differential equations with an emphasis on applications. Graphing calculators and Maple are used in this course. Topics include first- and second-order linear differential equations, non-linear equations, series solutions, Laplace transform methods, and linear systems.
Note: This course is also offered as ENGR 255. Students can receive credit for only one of MATH 255 and ENGR 255.
MATH 270 4 credits
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Prerequisite(s): Math 112, or a C or better in Math 116
An introduction to the theory and practice of statistics for engineering, science, and mathematics students who have experience with calculus. Topics include descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, expectation and variance of random variables, binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, exponential and normal distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, tests of goodness-of-fit and independence, correlation, simple linear regression.
MATH 280 3 credits
Further Topics in Probability and Statistics
Prerequisite(s): Math 270
Topics include conditional probability and expectation, Markov chains, Poisson processes, lifetime distributions and reliability, general inference techniques, fitting and testing simple probability models, application to production management and quality control, sequential analysis (as time permits).
MATH 302 3 credits
Analysis of Observational and Experimental Data
Prerequisite(s): Math 104 with at least a B+, or Math 106 with at least a B, or Math 270
This is a practical course on the use and understanding of multiple linear regression and the analysis of variance techniques. The MINITAB software is used throughout the course. Topics covered include the method of least-squares, the analysis of variance table, F tests, indicator variables, matched pairs, randomized block designs, one-way and two-way experimental designs, the comparison of regression lines, and the analysis of covariance. Logistic regression is discussed as time allows. Students complete a group project on a real data set.
Note: Students cannot obtain credit for both Math 302 and Bus 301 in a BA or BSc degree.
MATH 308 3 credits
Linear Programming
Prerequisite(s): Math 221
Linear programming is a powerful optimization technique which is used in many areas of business, science and engineering. This course provides an introduction to many applications. The simplex method and variations thereof are covered in depth along with duality theory and sensitivity analysis. Students do analysis by hand as well as with the computer.
MATH 312 3 credits
Vector Calculus
Prerequisite(s): Math 211
This course extends the ideas and techniques of calculus to higher dimensions. Topics include the calculus of space curves (parametrization, tangent/normal/binormal, Frenet formulae, curvature), general orthogonal curvilinear coordinates, the calculus of vector fields (line integrals, surface integrals) and the core results of vector calculus (Stokes’ Theorem, Divergence Theorem, and Green’s Theorem).
MATH 315 3 credits
Applied Regression Analysis
Prerequisite(s): MATH 104 with a B+ or better, or MATH 106 with a B or better, or MATH 270.
This is a practical course on the use and understanding of linear regression analysis. A statistical computer package such as MINITAB (or S-plus or SAS) software is used throughout the course. Topics include the method of least squares, the analysis of variance table, F tests, selection of predictor variables, diagnostics, remedial measures and validation, qualitative predictor variables, the comparison of regression models, the analysis of covariance, nonparametric regression, introduction to nonlinear regression analysis, and logistic regression. Students complete at least one group project using a real data set.
Note: Students cannot obtain credit for both MATH 315 and MATH 302.
MATH 316 3 credits
Numerical Analysis
Prerequisite(s): Math 112 or Math 221, and knowledge of a programming language acceptable to the department
This course covers the construction and application of numerical computing solutions to mathematical problems that include applications of linear algebra, differentiation and integration, non-linear equations, the approximation of functions, and ordinary differential equations.
MATH 320 3 credits
Advanced Calculus of One Variable
Prerequisite(s): Math 214
This course introduces some techniques of real analysis. Topics include infinite series, uniform convergence, Taylor series, the Riemann integral, improper integrals, and an introduction to analysis in abstract metric spaces.
MATH 322 3 credits
Complex Variables
Prerequisite(s): Math 211
This course provides an introduction to complex analysis and its applications. Topics include the algebra of complex numbers, geometry of the complex plane, analytic functions, contour integration, complex power series, residue theory, and an introduction to conformal mapping.
MATH 330 3 credits
Design of Experiments
Prerequisite(s): Math 270
This course discusses the construction and analysis of standard experimental designs. The basic techniques of randomization and blocking, and the use of covariates are reviewed, followed by consideration of the 2^k factorial and fractional factorial designs. Repeated measures designs are next discussed, including the split-plot and cross-over varieties. Variance components analysis and response surface methods are covered as time allows.
Emphasis is on the conduct, assumption, implications and rationale of particular designs. The data analysis is implemented using MINITAB software. Students are expected to produce a report resulting from analyzing data collected from an experiment which they have designed and conducted and which illustrates at least one of the major designs discussed.
MATH 343 3 credits
Applied Discrete Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): Math 225 and knowledge of a computing language acceptable to the instructor
This course introduces discrete modeling. Topics covered include generation of combinatorial objects, applications to scheduling, and applications of graphs.
MATH 350 3 credits
Survey Sampling
Prerequisite(s): Math 106 with at least a B, or Math 270
This course introduces the theory and practice of survey sampling. The basic theory of simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, ratio estimation, cluster sampling and systematic sampling is covered, together with the more specialized topics of questionnaire design, estimation of population size and the random response method for sensitive questions. Students are expected to produce a report resulting from analyzing data collected in a survey which they have designed and conducted, and which illustrates at least one of the sample designs discussed during the course.
MATH 355 3 credits
Number Theory and Applications
Prerequisite(s): Any second-year mathematics course
An introduction to the fundamental ideas of number theory, with attention to applications in computation, cryptography, and communications. Topics include primes and gcds, congruence, and applications (hashing functions, check digits), factorization methods and cryptology (ciphers, public key cryptography, etc.) and continued fractions.
MATH 360 3 credits
Operations Research I
Prerequisite(s): Math 211, Math 221. Math 308 recommended and will be required Fall 2006
This course is concerned with the application of mathematical models to problems arising in industry. Operations research was developed during and just after the last world war, and has had amazing success in enabling organizations to be more effective and efficient. The topics covered include: a brief review of linear programming; dynamic and integer programming, scheduling; nonlinear programming, optimization with and without constraints; network models and applications; and PERT and CPM.
MATH 370 3 credits
Probability & Stochastic Processes
Prerequisite(s): Math 211, Math 270
This course covers the theory of probability and stochastic processes for science and mathematics students who have experience with second-year calculus and elementary probability and statistics. Topics include probability space, conditional probability and independence, continuous and discrete random variables, jointly distributed random variables, expectation, conditional expectation and properties, limit theorems, Markov chains and Poisson processes, lifetime distributions, Cox’s proportional hazard model, Kaplan-Meier estimate of the survival function, and simulation.
MATH 381 3 credits
Mathematical Methods I
Prerequisite(s): Math 211, 312, 255, 221. Phys 111/112 recommended
This course covers a wide range of mathematical techniques: calculus problem-solving devices; Fourier series, Fourier integrals; the gamma, beta, and error functions; Bessel functions, Legendre, Hermite and Laguerre polynomials, Sturm-Liouville systems; partial differential equations; and calculus of variations.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for more than one of Math 381, Phys 381, or ENGR 257.
MATH 390 3 credits
Time Series and Forecasting
Prerequisite(s): Math 270 and Math 302
This course introduces the basic ideas of time series analysis and, in particular, the Box-Jenkins Integrated-Auto-Regressive-Moving-Average (ARIMA) family of models. The emphasis of this course is on practical implementation of the methods.
MATH 402 3 credits
Generalized Linear Models and Survival Analysis
Prerequisite(s): Math 270, 302
The course covers the application of the methods of the linear model analysis developed in MATH 302, MATH 315, and MATH 330 to non-normal data. This includes analysis of contingency tables using log-linear models, analysis of incidence data using Poisson models, analysis of binomial data using various link functions such as logit and probit, analysis of case-control data using logistic models, analysis of matched case-control data using logistic models, analysis of matched case-control data using conditional logistic regression, and analysis of survival data by adjusting for covariates or using Cox’s proportional hazard model.
MATH 410 3 credits
History of Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): 21 Math credits above Math 110
This course surveys the development of mathematical thought from antiquity to the present day. Emphasis is placed on topics likely to be familiar to undergraduates, which include numeration, arithmetic, geometry, number theory, calculus, probability, statistics, set theory, abstract algebra and analysis. While most of the course is concerned with so-called “Western” mathematics, consideration is paid to the development of mathematical concepts in other societies, such as the Chinese and the Mayan. The cultural and historical context in which mathematicians worked will be examined, along with the ways in which ideas about the nature and role of mathematics have changed over the centuries. Recommended for students considering a career in teaching as well as those wishing to know how their math courses fit into general and intellectual history.
MATH 420 3 credits
Empirical and Non-parametric Statistics
Prerequisite(s): Math 211 and Math 270
Empirical and non-parametric statistics are used either when little can be assumed about the underlying distribution or when the underlying distribution is very complex. These methods are based on order statistics, rankings, or re-sampling, and are very useful when a relatively quick answer is required.
MATH 438 3 credits
Advanced Linear Algebra
Prerequisite(s): Math 221 and at least two upper-level Math courses
Techniques and applications of linear algebra. Vector spaces; linear functionals; the singular value decomposition; the generalized inverse; canonical forms; the spectral decomposition.
MATH 439 3 credits
Modern Algebra
Prerequisite(s): Math 221
This course is an introduction to the ideas of modern algebra, with emphasis on group theory. Topics include groups and symmetry, group structure (Sylow theorems, finite Abelian groups) and group actions. The basic elements of ring theory (ideals and homomorphisms, integral domains, polynomial rings, unique factorization) and field theory (characteristic, algebraic extensions) are also considered
MATH 445 3 credits
Introduction to Graph Theory
Prerequisite(s): Math 211, Math 221 and at least two upper-level Math courses
This course is an introduction to graph theory and its applications.
MATH 450 3 credits
Parametric Statistical Theory
Prerequisite(s): Math 211, 221, 270 and at least three upper level courses in math and/or statistics.
Effective September 2006, the prerequisites will be: MATH 370.
An introduction to the ideas, nomenclature and techniques of the main schools of parametric statistical inference, excluding linear model theory. This is a theoretical course directed towards students specialising in either mathematics or statistics.
MATH 451 3 credits
Parametric Statistical Inference
Prerequisite(s): Math 450, or MATH 270 and (MATH 280 or MATH 460) and MATH 211 and at least two upper-level courses. Effective September 2006, the prerequisites will be: Math 450
Effective September 2006, the prerequisites will be: MATH 450.
A course on the ideas, nomenclature and techniques of the main schools of parametric statistical inference, namely, likelihood, Neyman-Pearson, Bayesian. The general similarities of the inferences made by each school will be emphasised, but inference situations which are controversial will also be discussed. This course is directed towards students specialising in either mathematics or statistics.
MATH 460 3 credits
Operations Research II (stochastic)
Prerequisite(s): Math 270, Math 360
The application of mathematical methods problems in industry and business, allowing for random occurrence.Topics include decisions under uncertainty, decision trees, utility, Bayesian analysis; renewal theory, stochastic inventory control, machine maintenance problems; Markov chains, Chapman-Kolmogorov equations; queuing models; multiserver queues, networks of queues, applications of queuing models; Markov decision processes, applications to inventory control and scheduling problems; simulations, random variables, reduction of variance, number of runs; reliability theory, systems with repair.
MATH 470 3 credits
Methods of Multivariate Statistics
Prerequisite(s): Math 211, 221, 270, 302, and two additional upper-level courses. (Effective September 2006, the prerequisites will be: Math 221 and Math 370)
This course is the extension of the linear model methods of Math 302 to the multi-variate situation. The emphasis of the course is on examination of a range of widely used multivariate statistical techniques, their relationship with familiar univariate methods and the solution to practical problems. Topics will include: Hostelling’s T^2, the analysis of dispersion, repeated measures, discriminant analysis, canonical correlations, principal components, factor analysis.
MATH 480 3 credits
Selected Topics in Mathematics
Prerequisite(s): Four upper-level Mathematics courses. Certain programs of study may require more particular prerequisites. The written permission of the instructor is required.
This course is designed for students who wish to examine in greater depth a particular topic in mathematics. It will be offered either as an individual reading course or as a seminar, depending on student and faculty interest.
Note: This course can be taken for further credit on different topics.
MATH 488 3 credits
Selected Topics in Statistics
Prerequisite(s): Four upper-level Mathematics courses, including at least three listed under the statistics option for the BA or BSc degree. Certain programs of study may require more particular prerequisites. The written permission of the instructor is required
This course is designed for students who wish to examine in greater depth a particular statistical technique or application. It will be offered either as an individual reading course or as a seminar, depending upon student and faculty interest. May not be repeated for additional credit.
Media and Communication Studies
Additional credits in Media and Communication Studies
Students interested in Media and Communication might also want to check courses listed under “Communications” beginning on page 256.
SCMS 270 can be used for lower-level MACS credit for the MACS minor. Students in the Associate of Arts (MACS) program should check with the Arts Advice Centre before taking SCMS 270.
The following SCMS courses can be used as upper-level MACS credit. Course descriptions are found under Social, Cultural, and Media Studies beginning on page 333.
• SCMS 334 — Cultural Policy
• SCMS 460 — Issues in the Information Society
MACS 110 3 credits
Introduction to Communication Theory
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to some of the major theories in media and communication studies. Topics include mass society and propaganda theories, limited-effects theories, critical and cultural theories, and audience theories.
MACS 130 3 credits
Explorations in Mass Communications
Prerequisite(s): None
This course examines mass media industries in Canada, such as television and the press; the political, economic, legal, and geographic factors that have shaped them; and the effects of these industries on Canadian political and cultural life. Topics include the role of the political journalist, the way audiences respond to media content, the relationship between media practices and government policy, and the fostering of Canadian cultural life.
MACS 210 3 credits
History of Communication
Prerequisite(s): None
Systems of Communication, from cave paintings to computers, are examined in relationship to shifts in perception. The focus of this course is on innovations in communications technologies in Western civilization: how they arose, their effects on social systems, and their impact on older forms of communication.
MACS 212 3 credits
Applied Communication
Prerequisite(s): C or better in CMNS 125, CMNS 155, CMNS 165, or Engl 105
This course assists students to develop practical strategies to communicate clearly to a variety of different audiences. Topics include the role and function of specialist languages in advertising, advocacy, and the media; social marketing; audience analysis; and desktop publishing.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both MACS 212 and CMNS 212.
MACS 215 3 credits
Advertising as Social Communication
Prerequisite(s): MACS 110 or 130
An interdisciplinary examination of the significance of advertising as a social message system in consumer society. The course presents a way of assessing the role that advertising plays in defining how we see ourselves, one another, and the world at large. There is a brief history of advertising but the focus is on current styles and functions of the global advertising business.
MACS 221 3 credits
Media and Audiences
Prerequisite(s): MACS 110 or 130
Corequisite(s): None
This course provides an introduction to the field of cultural studies, particularly as it relates to contemporary popular culture. Writers in cultural studies endeavour to take a critical look at the mass media and their audiences. How do media and audiences affect each other, and how does this relationship make for a better or a worse society?
MACS 230 3 credits
Introduction to Communication Media
Prerequisite(s): MACS 110 or MACS 130
This course explores communications industries in Canada with an emphasis on film, music, and book publishing. It reviews the history, current state, and future of each of these three industries, including government interventions, technological challenges, the functions of key personnel, the production and promotion process, and significant works. Among the readings are personal narratives from people involved in film, music, and publishing in Canada.
MACS 240 3 credits
The Political Economy of Communication
Prerequisite(s): MACS 110 or MACS 130
This course explores the political economy of communication. Scholars working within this perspective are interested in cultural industries. They study how such industries gather, select, package, promote, and distribute information and entertainment in the world today. In doing so, scholars focus on how financial and political factors shape the content and form of what ultimately reaches audiences around the world. The course includes a look at the political economy of communication in Latin America.
MACS 490 4 credits
Directed Studies in Media and Communications Studies
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include nine credits of MACS or relevant SCMS, and written permission of the instructor and the department head.
Designed for upper-level students who wish to examine in greater depth a particular problem/issue in media and communication studies.
Music
MUSC 101 3 credits
Listening to Music
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces students to the perceptive and analytical skills required for listening to and describing music. It is intended for students wishing to pursue further music education from an established music, music education, or arts program. The course presents a series of sequential listening skills and their accompanying descriptive vocabulary. Rather than focusing on a specific set of repertoire, this course studies the musical concepts common to a variety of repertoires. Repertoire for the course will complement live performances being presented in the local area.
MUSC 150 3 credits
Introduction to Music History — Music of the Twentieth Century
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces to students methods of analyzing musical genres and trends with a focus on major social, cultural, and political contexts for the music. Beginning at the twentieth century, we will examine the music of post-romantic, impressionist, expressionist, nationalist, popular, and experimental styles. Special attention will be given to important Canadian and American composers and performers and their musical responses to major events in North American history.