Nursing
All seats for these courses are reserved for nursing students.
The nursing courses and most of the support courses (see Health Sciences, page 293) for each semester, are prerequisites for other course work in the next semester. Due to the integrated nature of the nursing courses, progression from one semester to the next requires concurrent completion of the nursing courses.
NURS 101 4 credits
Determinants of Health
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Nursing program
Corequisite(s): Nurs 102, Nurs 103
This course will give students an overview of the determinants of health. The World Health Organization definition of health will give direction to the resources (personal, social, and professional) and environmental factors which interact to influence health. A specific discussion of personal resources will focus on the dimensions (physiological, psychosocial, cultural, developmental, spiritual) comprising each individual. Students will also consider the personal meaning of health, health promotion, and health maintenance within the primary healthcare philosophy of healthcare delivery. Another aspect of this course will be an introduction to the concept of transitions. Choices made by the person regarding transitions (developmental, health/illness, situational, and organizational) have implications for individual health. Exploration of lifespan development and developmental transitions relating to the childbearing family and aging will be discussed in greater depth.
NURS 102 3 credits
Introduction to Partnerships
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Nursing program
Corequisite(s): Nurs 101; Nurs 103
This course will examine the changing role of nursing from provider to partner. Students will discover the importance of personal and professional skills necessary for effective partnerships with individuals. The concept of caring is introduced as foundational to partnerships.
NURS 103 4 credits
Nursing Practice
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Nursing program
Corequisite(s): Nurs 101; Nurs 102
Nursing Practice will include laboratory, community, maternal/child follow through, and intermediate care experiences with wellness as a focus. Students will be introduced to beginning assessment and related clinical skills. Clinical practice will enhance students’ understanding of developmental transitions and give students an opportunity to observe, practice assessment and interviewing skills, and assist with selected self-care activities.
NURS 104 4 credits
Developmental Transitions
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 101
Corequisite(s): Nurs 105; Nurs 106
The interrelationship between determinants of health and transitions is the focus of this course. How an individual manages a transition is dependent on environmental factors and the personal, social, and professional resources available. An overview of social resources will emphasize social support. Professional resources will include continued discussion of the Framework for Caring. Students will also continue their exploration of lifespan development and developmental transitions relating to childbearing, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and aging.
NURS 105 3 credits
Teacher Learner Partnerships
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 102
Corequisite(s): Nurs 104, Nurs 106
This course explores teacher-learner partnerships with the student in the role of both teacher and learner. Characteristics of teaching and learning are examined through thinking, critical thinking, and critical reflection processes. Concepts of advocacy, empowerment, accountability and responsibility, and choice are considered in the teacher-learner partnership. Integral to these concepts is professional caring as it relates to communication with individuals.
NURS 106 5 credits
Nursing Practice
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 103
Corequisite(s): Nurs 104, Nurs 105
This course will include laboratory and clinical experiences. Laboratory experiences will prepare students to effectively care for individuals in clinical settings. Clinical experiences will occur in community and hospital settings and will include extended care, maternal/child care, mental health, and family follow-through experiences. Caring for individuals undergoing developmental transitions will continue to be a focus. Students will have opportunity to use communication skills throughout their nursing practice experience.
NURS 120 3 credits
Clinical Consolidation I
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 106, HSC 112, HSC 114
Students will have a four-week clinical experience on a medical nursing unit in a hospital setting. This experience will provide opportunities to apply theory taught in the first year of the nursing program. The practicum will focus on the individual in transition. Students will have opportunities to consolidate basic assessment, personal care, and communication skills.
NURS 201 3 credits
Health Illness Transition I
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 120
Corequisite(s): Nurs 202, Nurs 203
This course focuses on application of the Model of Transition to persons experiencing health illness transitions. The Framework for Caring will provide the ongoing structure for studying examples of alterations in health. A case-study format facilitates the integration of theories and use of critical thinking skills. The concepts of pain and uncertainty will be introduced. This course also includes a continued study of PHC and environmental factors as they relate to health-illness transitions.
NURS 202 2 credits
Partnering with Families
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 120
Corequisite(s): Nurs 201, Nurs 203
Students will learn and apply theory integral to forming partnerships with families. A focus on dynamics of the family will heighten the student’s awareness and sensitivity to family diversity. The dimensions tool will provide a framework for family assessments.
NURS 203 6 credits
Nursing Practice
Prerequisite(s): Engl 105, Nurs 120
Corequisite(s): Nurs 201, Nurs 202
Students will be given opportunities to establish partnerships with individuals and families. Laboratory experiences will prepare students to effectively care for individuals in clinical settings. Students will care for one or two individuals experiencing health-illness transitions in medical, surgical, and pediatric acute care settings.
NURS 204 3 credits
Health Illness Transitions II
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 201
Corequisite(s): Nurs 205, Nurs 206
This course is a continuation of the application of the Model of Transition to persons experiencing health-illness transitions introduced in Nurs 201. A central focus for the health-illness transitions discussed in this course is the concept of chronicity. Other related concepts, such as hope and vulnerability, will be introduced within the context of various health-illness transitions. This course will continue to apply the Framework for Caring in a case-study format to selected examples of alterations in health.
NURS 205 2 credits
Partnerships within the Nursing Profession
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 202
Corequisite(s): Nurs 204, Nurs 206
This course will explore partnerships in nursing practice. Nurse leaders must be able to communicate clearly within the profession and within a broader health care context. Students will explore concepts related to leadership, group dynamics, and organizations in which nurses practise. Theory related to conflict resolution and change will be examined.
NURS 206 6 credits
Nursing Practice
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 203
Corequisite(s): Nurs 204, Nurs 205
Students will be given the opportunity to establish partnerships with individuals and families. Laboratory experiences will prepare students to effectively care for individuals in clinical settings. Students will care for two or three individuals experiencing health/illness transitions in medical, surgical, and pediatric acute care setting. The concept of chronicity will be specifically explored through building partnerships with families who have a chronic challenge.
NURS 220 3 credits
Clinical Consolidation II
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 206, HSC 212
Students will have a four-week clinical experience on a surgical nursing unit in a hospital setting. This experience will provide opportunities to consolidate and integrate theory. The practicum will focus on various transitions experienced by the individual and involved family members. Students will have opportunities to apply the Framework for Caring.
NURS 301 3 credits
Multiple Transitions
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 220
Corequisite(s): Nurs 302, Nurs 303
This course will focus on a study of individuals experiencing multiple transitions. Emphasis will be given to experiences associated with health illness, developmental, and situational transitions. Multiple transitions will be introduced through the concept of continuum of care. This concept will provide students with a framework to address a comprehensive array of activities spanning all levels of care. Particular emphasis will be given to persons experiencing transitions associated with psychiatric mental health, palliative care, and aging. Selected case studies based on complex practice examples will be discussed. This course will also include a review of nursing care related to multiple transitions associated with trauma.
NURS 302 2 credits
Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 220
Corequisite(s): Nurs 301, Nurs 303
Collaborative partnerships will be the focus of this course. A knowledge of health care disciplines and an examination of various levels of working relationships will facilitate development of professional collaboration. A look beyond the traditional health care professions will include an exploration of the role of individuals practising complementary/alternative therapies. Social resources will be explored, specifically addressing the role of lay caregivers and volunteers.
NURS 303 6 credits
Nursing Practice
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 220
Corequisite(s): Nurs 301, Nurs 302
Students will establish partnerships with people experiencing multiple transitions. Laboratory experiences will prepare students to effectively care for individuals across the continuum of care. Students will care for individuals in medical acute care settings including a palliative care and rehabilitation focus and also in psychiatric acute care settings. In addition, students will experience the continuum of care as they follow people into the community.
NURS 304 3 credits
Situational Transitions
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 301 or Nurs 311, HSC 310
Corequisite(s): Nurs 306, Nurs 307
This course will provide an in-depth exploration of the experience of situational transitions. The nurse’s role in promoting health with persons experiencing these lifestyle changes requires a knowledge of empowerment, resilience, and moral conflict. Theories of powerlessness, crisis management, counselling, and moral agency will provide the basis for the promotion of health. The role of groups will be explored as a source of support for individuals and families experiencing situational transitions. Collaboration with other disciplines and sectors will be addressed as it relates to health promotion. In addition, discussion of gender issues will present an enhanced awareness of gender specific factors in relation to the experience of situational transition.
NURS 306 3 credits
Nursing Practice
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 303 or Nurs 311
Corequisite(s): Nurs 304 and Nurs 307
Students will be given the opportunity to establish partnerships in the community with individuals and families experiencing developmental, health/illness, and situational transitions. Students will further their understanding of the continuum of care through selected community experiences such as Home Nursing Care. Additional community experiences will include health promotion activities for individuals and families experiencing situational transitions. Placement experiences will provide the opportunity for participation in interdisciplinary and intersectoral collaboration as it applies to the promotion of health and the continuity of care of individuals and families.
NURS 307 3 credits
Nursing Research
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 301
Corequisite(s): Nurs 304 and Nurs 306
This introductory research course incorporates a study of research concepts and techniques that enables the student to analyze nursing studies and apply pertinent findings to nursing care. Students will acquire familiarity with the process of scientific inquiry as the basis for generation of nursing knowledge. Underlying paradigms shaping nursing research will be described in the analysis of qualitative and quantitative research. This course will provide the student with a foundation for the development of evidence-based nursing practice.
NURS 401 4 credits
Community Health
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 304 and HSC 312
Corequisite(s): Nurs 403
An exploration of community health nursing using the philosophy of primary health care as a model. Students will learn how to do a community assessment and plan a health promotion program relevant to an identified community population. Students will explore the role of the public health nurse and the scope of that practice. An understanding of epidemiological concepts will assist students as they consider the role of the community health nurse. A potential role for nursing within the political environment will emphasize the need for intersectoral collaboration. A study of organizational transitions including transitions in the agencies within which nurses practise, communities in transition, and transitions in nursing practice.
NURS 403 4 credits
Nursing Practice
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 306
Corequisite(s): Nurs 401
Students will be given the opportunity to establish partnerships with person(s) (individuals, families, groups/populations, and community as client) experiencing a variety of transitions. By experiencing the role of the public health nurse, students will further their understanding of the principles of primary health care, teaching and learning, and the concept of epidemiology when partnering with person(s) in homes, health clinics, schools, and community settings. Placement experiences will provide an opportunity for participation and intersectoral collaboration as it applies to promotion of health, communicable disease control and continuity of care for person(s) in the community.
NURS 406 16 credits
Preceptorship/Mentorship
Prerequisite(s): Nurs 403, HSC 410, and one of Math 104, Math 106 or Math 108
This course is designed to provide students with a consolidated practice experience. A concentrated experience at a primary site will enhance and further develop the student’s scope of practice. A program development project will facilitate the integration of core curriculum concepts including determinants of health, transitions, and principles of primary health care. A research- based approach will be reflected in both the practice arena and the program development project. Basic students will have the opportunity to further integrate theory and skills in preparation for entry to practice. The Basic student will be partnered with an RN preceptor to assist the student to gradually assume responsibility for entry-level RN practice. RN Access students will have the opportunity to explore new role experiences and challenges in relation to the integration of theory and practice. The RN Access student will be partnered with a mentor to facilitate the student experience.
Philosophy
PHIL 100 3 credits
Reasoning
Prerequisite(s): None
Have you ever tried to figure out why someone’s reasoning wasn’t quite right? Have you ever had your own cherished reasoning demolished? Have your essays, exams, or lab reports ever been torn apart for being illogical? If so, you need this course.
Good reasoning is the basis for successful thought and action. Good methods of reasoning help us to analyze an issue or problem, to assess various solutions, and to understand how to find the correct answer.
In order to detect and avoid errors in our reasoning, we examine fallacies of reasoning, different forms of arguments, the concepts of truth and validity, proof and evidence, consistency and contradiction, definition and generalization, deduction and induction. Throughout the course, we apply our methods of reasoning to various issues, both practical and theoretical.
PHIL 110 3 credits
Morality and Politics
Prerequisite(s): None
There have always been conflicts between individuals, and between social organizations and the individuals who compose them. What is the nature and source of these conflicts? Are they due to human nature? What rights and obligations do individuals have? What rights and obligations do social organizations — such as the state, a trade union, the family — have to their members? What are justice and freedom? These questions, and the answers offered by classic and contemporary authors such as Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx, are examined in lectures, films, discussions and writing.
PHIL 120 3 credits
Knowledge and Reality
Prerequisite(s): None
Many of the traditional problems and arguments in philosophy deal with the nature of human individuality.
Individuality is acclaimed as one of the great achievements of western civilization. The progress of civilization has often been measured by how much individuality is allowed to flourish. What is individuality? What makes me a unique individual?
In order to answer these questions, we also need to ask: When do I have free will to express my individuality? What is the relationship between my physical nature — my body — and my spiritual nature — my mind? Am I really anything more than a complicated thinking machine? What happens to me when I die?
PHIL 210 3 credits
Contemporary Issues in Morality and Politics
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits of university-level course work
Through seminars and directed reading, problems of current interest in moral and political philosophy are dealt with, including conflicts between dominant moral theories, between the demands of morality and of politics, and between theories of justice, freedom, and human nature.
Note: Phil 210 is the same as POSC 270. Although the transferability may differ, credit cannot be obtained for both Phil 210 and POSC 210 at UCFV.
PHIL 220 3 credits
Issues in Metaphysics and Epistemology
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits of university-level course work
Through seminars and directed reading, traditional problems of metaphysics and epistemology are examined, such as the nature of persons, theories of truth, free will and determinism, the nature of space and time, language and meaning, the relation of evidence to knowledge and belief, scientific method.
PHIL 230 3 credits
Philosophy of Law
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits of university-level course work
Our legal and penal systems are often severely criticized. We can better understand these criticisms and the issues they raise if we can answer a number of philosophical questions about the nature of law, punishment, and responsibility.
Why do we have laws? What is law: is it essentially a constraining force or is it a force for freedom? What is the relationship of the law to morality: should the law enforce morality? When is a person responsible for an act and thus legally liable for punishment? Why do we punish criminals: to deter crimes, to rehabilitate the criminal, or to “pay back” the criminal? Is it ever justified to break the law?
Note: Phil 230 (formerly 130) is the same as Crim 130. Although the transferability may differ, credit cannot be obtained for both Phil 230 and Crim 130 at UCFV.
PHIL 240 3 credits
Faith and Reason: Philosophy of Religion
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits of university-level course work
Religion is hailed for giving value to our lives where science and humanism fail, and it is condemned as a crutch, an illusion, a mere hedging of bets. What is the special character of religion? Is it appropriate to ask for evidence in religion, for example, in support of the existence of God, or does religion rely on special experiences of revelation and miracles? These questions raise many further issues such as the nature of God, the possibility of an afterlife, and the nature of good and evil. Responses to these and other questions given by people such as Plato, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, and Freud are examined in lectures, films, discussion, and writing.
PHIL 250 3 credits
History of Western Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits of university-level course work
Who was Socrates and why did so many want him dead? What is Platonic love, anyway? Why did Diogenes wear nothing but a barrel? These questions and many more will be explored in this course. Western philosophy began in Ancient Greece and the questions and concerns that fascinated the Greeks are still with us today. In this course, students will read the works of Plato and Aristotle as well as those of the Pre-Socratics and the Hellenistic schools of Stoicism and Epicureanism. The class will be of value to students of philosophy as well as those interested in the history of Western culture.
PHIL 251 3 credits
History of Western Philosophy: Descartes to Kant
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits of university-level work.
It is often said that intellectual modernity begins with the philosophy of Rene Descartes. This course is true to that assertion. We will explore the writings of Descartes with the hope of shedding light on his work as well as on the work of those who came after. By the end of the course, the student will have also studied the works of Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Kant. The course will be of interest to students of philosophy as well as those curious about the root of so many ideas we now take to be commonplace.
PHIL 252 3 credits
History of Modern Philosophy: From Kant to Sartre
Prerequisite(s): 15 credits of university-level course work
The real-life killers depicted in Orson Welles’ film Compulsion were said to have been inspired by the writings of Freidrich Nietzsche. Adolf Hitler was rumoured to have carried a copy of Arthur Schopenhauer’s The World as Will and Representation with him during World War I. These are just two examples of the intersection of 19th and 20th century philosophy and history. In this course we will examine the works of Nietzsche, Schopenhauer and other European philosophers such as Hegel, Heidegger and Sartre. The intent is to highlight the works of these thinkers so that the student can understand their importance to philosophy as well as the impact they had on the world.
PHIL 305 3 credits
Philosophy of Decision Making and Dispute Resolution
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits of university-level course work. Phil 100 and/or 110 recommended
Complex decisions and dispute resolution tax our reasoning skills to the limit and challenge our hopes and beliefs. This course reflects critically on the philosophical principles behind different models of decision making and dispute resolution currently in use in law, business, and social settings. It enables students to make informed judgements about how suitable these models are for their own professional and personal contexts.
PHIL 310 3 credits
Ethics and Public Policy
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits in Applied or Arts or Science programs, including nine credits in Philosophy or Political Science
Sometimes our ethics are about how we act individually; for example, whether to make a charitable donation for cancer research. Sometimes, our ethics are about our political practices; for example, whether to make our charitable donations tax deductible.
What role should ethics play in our social and political practices? Should our ethics — what we think is right — take into account the realities of politics — of how we collectively make decisions? Should we structure our social and political practices to meet ethical requirements?
In order to pursue these questions about diverse practices such as health care, international relations, business, employment relations, and government, we will look at various approaches to ethics that focus on practical issues of forming, justifying, and implementing political and social solutions.
PHIL 312 3 credits
Occupational Ethics
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Applied or Arts or Science programs, including one of Philosophy 110,210, 230, Political Science 120 or 270
Whether you are an employee, an employer, or an entrepreneur, you will face difficult ethical decisions in your working life. Every stage of employment, from choosing your career to deciding to retire, raises questions about your role and responsibilities, whether you are the boss or the customer, the professional or the student, the caregiver or the client. How should you choose a career? What rights should you have as a boss or as a subordinate? What information is private, what should be kept confidential, and what must be shared? How will you determine and balance your loyalties, your priorities, and your responsibilities? When and why should you go the extra mile for a client, a colleague, or a boss? When should your job take second place to your personal life? This course will examine a variety of ethical issues in employment and show you how to apply ethical theories to situations you will face.
PHIL 315 3 credits
Contemporary Ethical Theory
Prerequisite(s): Phil 110 and six additional credits of Philosophy or Political Science
Justifying positions on practical moral issues such as abortion, capital punishment, the duty to contribute to famine relief, or the rights of aboriginal peoples, requires reference to ethical principles which must themselves be justified. This course addresses problems in the justification of moral principles. Topics to be covered may include the objectivity of moral judgment, moral relativism, the nature of the good, impartiality, egoism, utilitarianism, deontology, feminist ethics and virtue ethics. The course will focus on detailed discussion of these concepts and theories as they affect practical moral reasoning.
PHIL 318 3 credits
Environmental Ethics
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, including nine credits in Philosophy or Political Science; or permission of the instructor.
Do modern Western assumptions divorce humans from nature, divide mind and body, and justify using science and technology as means of dominating our environment for human convenience? Do environmental problems result? Are there better approaches to the environment? We will examine local examples of global issues to produce proposals for individual and collective action.
PHIL 323 3 credits
Philosophical Issues in the Social Sciences: Values, Objectivity, and Neutrality
Prerequisite(s): Six credits of philosophy or 45 credits of Arts and Applied Arts courses
The social and human sciences are highly influential in contemporary social and political life. To what extent are economics, sociology, archaeology, anthropology, psychology, and political science, truly “scientific”? Is it reasonable to expect them to lead to law-like conclusions about social phenomena? What is the role of interpretation in explanations of social events? How do the facts of cultural and gender diversity affect the capacity to understand social phenomena? Is there some cross-cultural rationality that can be applied to all societies? Is it possible for social scientists to maintain political and gender neutrality, or is social inquiry always tainted by the biases of the researcher?
PHIL 325 3 credits
Contemporary Philosophy: The Problem of Truth
Prerequisite(s): Phil 120 and six additional credits of Philosophy
“The truth is out there.” “Truth is stranger than fiction.” “The truth will set you free.” Clichés concerning the truth abound. However, in contemporary academic circles, these commonplace assertions are actively questioned. Hence it’s not unusual to find philosophers who argue that the truth is nowhere, that the truth is fiction or that the idea of truth is a weapon of oppression. In this course we examine such radical positions as well as recent attempts made to redeem the concept of truth. Topics to be examined may include the relationship between language and truth, the debate over the nature of texts, and the status of truth as a socially determined concept.
PHIL 360 3 credits
Special Topics: Contemporary Issues for Philosophical Analysis
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Sciences or Applied programs, including one of Phil 100, Phil 110, Phil 120
The course will provide students with an opportunity to investigate contemporary cultural and social issues using the methods of philosophical analysis. The student will gain a broader understanding of modern problems and will acquire a greater appreciation for the practical application of philosophical techniques. Topics will vary with instructor but may include the status of gender in society, the concept of information, and the philosophy of technology.
PHIL 362 3 credits
Philosophy of Education
Prerequisite(s): Phil 110 or 45 credits of Arts and Applied Arts courses
This course is an introduction to the ethical and philosophical dimensions of education. Topics to be examined concern the aims of education, autonomy, the justification of education, the value of knowledge, the distinction between education and indoctrination, the education of the emotions, the justification of educational authority, equality of educational opportunity, personal relationships in teaching, professional ethics in teaching, and moral education.
Note: Students cannot take Educ 362 for further credit.
PHIL 364 3 credits
Philosophy and Children
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Applied or Arts or Science programs
What is a child? The concept of a child occupies a precarious position and has not always received the attention that it deserves. Not yet a fully rational agent, but endowed with the potential to become one, the child’s status spells trouble for core philosophical concepts. Theories of rationality, freedom, personal identity, and responsibility all impact children and their caregivers, yet often ignore them. Delving into philosophical theory and the practical issues of childhood, this course is of great importance not just to philosophers but to anyone who works with children, has children, or was once a child.
PHIL 367 3 credits
Philosophy for Counsellors
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits in Applied or Arts or Science programs, including one of Phil 100, 110, 120, 210 or 240
How can philosophy make you a better counsellor? What are the How can philosophy strategies you can offer someone who is trying to make a moral decision? This course will introduce students interested in the practice of psychotherapy, counselling, and social work to the useful skills and information found in philosophy. Topics may include how to apply ethical theories to every-day moral decision-making, how to recognize and deal with a client’s problematic thinking habits, and how to differentiate between facts, values, feelings, and meaning.
PHIL 370 3 credits
Practical Studies in Applied Ethics and Politics
Prerequisite(s): One of Phil 110 or Phil 210 or Phil 230, and one of POSC 100 or POSC 110 or POSC 120 or POSC 270
This course provides an opportunity to connect the philosophical and political aspects of practical life with work, through participation in jobs and activities such as student and educational governance, charitable, not-for-profit institutions, or work in business and government. Students will apply theoretical work on leadership, public service, and ethics to understanding ethical decision-making, the duties and rights of individual members within organizations and society, and political structures.
PHIL 480 3 credits
Selected Topics in Morality and Politics
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Science, or Applied programs, including any one of: POSC 311, POSC 312, PHIL 305, Phil 310, Phil 315
A detailed exploration of one or more typical issues in the application of morality to politics, or politics to morality.
PHIL 481 3 credits
Selected Topics in Epistemology and Metaphysics
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Sciences or Applied programs, including one of Phil 120, Phil 220
This course will allow the student to investigate a range of problems in epistemology and metaphysics. It builds on the discussion of topics introduced in lower level courses in the philosophy of knowledge and reality. The focus will vary with the instructor but can include cognitive philosophy, philosophy of mind, fundamental ontology and skepticism.
PHIL 482 3 credits
Selected Topics in the History of Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Sciences or Applied programs, including one of Phil 120, Phil 220, Phil 250, Phil 251 or Phil 252
The course will allow the student to investigate a specific area in the history of philosophy. It will build on what is offered in lower level philosophy courses. The course is primarily intended as an exploration of material not covered in other classes or for a more advanced study of a particular philosopher.
PHIL 483 3 credits
Selected Topics in Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Sciences or Applied programs, including three credits of lower level philosophy
The course will allow the student to investigate in detail topics not found in regular course offerings or to engage in a more detailed study of problems or philosophers introduced in other courses. Topics covered will vary according to instructor and may include such areas as philosophy of art, philosophy of language or hermeneutics and phenomenology.
PHIL 490 3 credits
Directed Studies in Ethical and Political Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Twelve credits of Philosophy or Political Science courses, and written consent of both the Faculty Member and the department head
This course offers the student the opportunity to pursue in depth independent study of a particular issue, problem or topic in the areas of ethical or political philosophy. The student must, in consultation with a Faculty Member, develop a detailed individual course proposal indicating the readings or other study to be undertaken and how the course work will be assessed.
PHIL 491 3 credits
Directed Studies in Philosophy
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of Philosophy courses, and written consent of both the faculty member and the department head
This course offers students the opportunity to pursue in-depth independent study of a particular issue, problem, or topic in any area of philosophy. The student must, in consultation with a faculty member, develop a detailed individual course proposal indicating the readings or other study to be undertaken and how the course work will be assessed.
Note: This course does not count towards the minor in Applied Ethical and Political Philosophy.
Physics
Unless stated otherwise, the minimum grade acceptable in all course prerequisites is a C-.
PHYS 083 4 credits
Preparatory College Physics I
Prerequisite(s): Math 11 (or Principles of Math 11), or Math 084 or Math 085
This is a college preparatory course equivalent to the Physics 11 course taught in B.C.’s high schools. Successful completion of this course provides the prerequisites to enrol in Phys 101 at UCFV. No prior knowledge of physics is needed or supposed, but it would be advisable to have passed Math 11 (or Principles of Math 11) or Math 085 before enrolling in Phys 083.
This course covers the main concepts in mechanics and optics. In mechanics the topics studied are kinematics, vectors, Newton’s laws, translational motion with applied forces, centripetal force, energy, work, and momentum. In optics the topics covered are: properties of light, reflection, image formation from plane mirrors, and spherical mirrors, refraction, image formation from convex and concave lenses, diffraction, and models of light.
A large number of experiments will be assigned to provide correlation between the classroom theory and practical applications.
PHYS 093 4 credits
Preparatory College Physics II
Prerequisite(s): Math 11 (or Principles of Math 11), Phys 083 (Physics 11), or Phys 100
This is a college preparatory course equivalent to the Physics 12 course taught in B.C.’s high schools. Successful completion of this course gives the prerequisites to enrol in Phys 111 at UCFV.
The concepts covered are mechanics, electricity, and magnetism. In mechanics the topics are kinematics with emphasis on 2D motion, vectors, Newton’s laws, Newton’s gravitational law, projectile motion, centripetal force, conservation of energy, work, conservation of momentum. In electricity and magnetism the topics are: Coulomb’s law, electric fields, potential and potential difference, Ohm’s law, circuits, resistances in series and parallel, Kirchhoff’s laws, magnetic fields and their sources, and forces produced by magnetic fields. A large number of experiments will be assigned to provide correlation between the classroom theory and practical applications.
PHYS 100 4 credits
Introductory Physics
Prerequisite(s): Math 11 (or Principles of Math 11), and either Math 12 or Math 094
Corequisite(s): Math 095 suggested
This course is designed for students who have not taken physics before, and either need Grade 11 physics equivalency for entry to a technical program, or are interested in continuing on in science. It may satisfy the Laboratory Science requirements of Arts students. The course material overlaps Physics 11, and includes such topics as: kinematics, energy, wave motion and geometric optics. Some discussion of relativity and nuclear energy is also included.
PHYS 101 5 credits
Introductory General Physics: Mechanics and Fluids
Prerequisite(s): One of (Principles of Math 12 or UCFV Math 094/095), and one of (Physics 11, Phys 083, or Phys 100). Students enrolling in Math 111 might wish to enroll in Phys 111
This is an introductory non-calculus Physics course. The course covers Newtonian mechanics; motion, momentum, and energy of particles, rigid rotating bodies, and fluids. The object of the course is to develop both an understanding of physical laws and logical problem-solving skills. The course has lectures, tutorials, and laboratory experiments.
Note: Physics 111 is the entry course for upper-level physics. Students with Phys 111 cannot take Phys 101 for further credit.
PHYS 103 4 credits
Astronomy: The Solar System
Prerequisite(s): Principles of Math 11 or Applications of Math 11 with at least a C
This introductory course in astronomy focuses on the solar system. Topics include a brief history of astronomy, Newton’s laws, gravity, orbits, eclipses, and seasons. It includes a discussion of the nature of light and other electromagnetic radiation, relativity and quantum theory, and a description of modern astronomical instruments. The second half of the course describes the geology, geography, and climates of the nine planets in the solar system, along with their moons and the asteroids. Origin of the solar system is discussed.
PHYS 104 4 credits
Astronomy: The Cosmos
Prerequisite(s): Principles of Math 11, or at least a C in Applications of Math 11
This introductory course in astronomy focuses on the stars and universe. Topics include properties of stars, galaxies, life cycle of a star, modern theories in astronomy, and origin and evolution of the universe. Students will be given a number of laboratory exercises to supplement the material covered in class. The course will place emphasis on conceptual development rather than a rigorous mathematical treatment and is a suitable non-calculus-based laboratory science course for Arts students.
PHYS 105 5 credits
Non-Calculus Physics
Prerequisite(s): Principles of Math 12 and Physics 11. One of: Physics 12 or Phys 101 or Phys 111 highly recommended
Though suitable for all science students, this course is of particular interest to students taking biology and chemistry. Topics include: thermodynamics, waves, geometric and wave optics, electricity and instrumentation, and an introduction to quantum phenomena. This course can be taken by students who only need one non-calculus physics course and already have Grade 12 physics, or can be the second half of a full-year non-calculus program. The course can also be used in combination with Physics 111 as an entry into a UCFV physics major, although Physics 111 and 112 is the preferred route.
Note: Both Phys 101 and Phys 105 are often required for transfer.
PHYS 111 5 credits
Mechanics
Prerequisite(s): Physics 11 or Phys 100; Physics 12 recommended
Corequisite(s): Math 111 (Calculus)
The course is intended for students who are planning to study engineering, science, or life sciences. Topics include vectors, kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, collisions, rotational kinematics, rotational dynamics, simple harmonic motion, and gravitation. The object is to understand the fundamental laws of mechanics, to learn how to apply the theory to solve related problems, and to develop a feeling for the order of magnitude of physical quantities in real experiments.
Note: Students with Phys 111 cannot take Phys 101 for further credit.
PHYS 112 5 credits
Electricity and Magnetism
Prerequisite(s): Phys 101 with a B+ or better, or Phys 111
Pre- or corequisite(s): Math 112
The course follows Phys 111 and is designed for students who are planning to continue their studies in physics or any of the other sciences. Topics include electric fields, Gauss’s law, electric potential, circuits, Kirchhoff’s laws, magnetic fields, magnetic induction, and finally, a study of Maxwell’s equations. The laboratory portion of the course uses experiments to reinforce the theory covered in class.
PHYS 221 4 credits
Intermediate Mechanics
Prerequisite(s): Phys 111/112 or 101/105 with a B+ average
Corequisite(s): Math 211
This course extends the topics covered in Phys 111. Topics covered include kinematics, motion in polar coordinates, Newton’s laws, momentum work, some mathematical aspects of physics and vector analysis (gradient, divergence, curl, Stokes’ theorem and Gauss’s law), angular momentum, forced and damped harmonic motion, central forces and Lagrangian mechanics. The laboratory portion of the course includes experiments designed to supplement the theory covered in class.
PHYS 222 4 credits
Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism
Prerequisite(s): Phys 221
This course extends the topics covered in Phys 112. Topics include steady-state and time-varying electric and magnetic fields, elements of DC and AC circuits, complex vector representation of sinusoidal quantities, and electric and magnetic properties of solids. Experiments in voltage, current and impedance measurements, and RC, RL, and RLC circuits are used to reinforce the classroom theory. The course will be presented using lectures, tutorials, and laboratory experiments.
PHYS 231 3 credits
Introductory Thermodynamics
Prerequisite(s): Phys 111, Math 111
Corequisite(s): Math 112
This course is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in engineering or physical science. This is an introductory course designed to study the fundamentals of heat, energy, and thermodynamics. Topics include temperature, heat, the first and second law of thermodynamics, phase change, and the kinetic theory of gases.
To ensure a comprehensive treatment of the above topics the course will be presented using lectures, tutorials and computer simulations.
PHYS 252 3 credits
Introduction to Twentieth Century Physics: Special Relativity and Quantum Physics
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 221
This is an introductory course in Einstein’s theory of special relativity and quantum physics. The course will use qualitative discussions of the two theories along with the development of the more formal mathematics needed to acquire a deeper understanding of the theories. Special relativity theory topics include: problems which occurred in the “old physics”, Lorentz transformations, geometrical interpretations of the Lorentz transformations, dynamics, conservation laws, and the so-called paradoxes of relativity. Quantum physics topics include: the difficulties arising from the “old physics”, short discussion of the first quantum theories (old quantum mechanics), Schrodinger’s wave equation, simple time independent solutions for Schrodinger’s equation, and applications of quantum physics to atoms and nuclei.
PHYS 302 3 credits
Optics
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Phys 222 or (Phys 105, 112 and 221)
This introductory optics course surveys both geometrical and wave optics. Topics will include: laws of reflection and refraction; interference and diffraction; Fourier methods; and holography.
PHYS 311 3 credits
Statistical Physics
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Phys 231
This course introduces students to the advanced methods of statistical physics. Connections with thermodynamics are emphasized. Topics include canonical ensembles, partition functions, and quantum statistics.
PHYS 321 3 credits
Advanced Mechanics
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Phys 221
The object of this course is to extend the concepts studied in Phys 221. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, gravitation, central forces, motion in noninertial reference frames, Hamilton’s principle and Lagrange’s equations, systems of particles, and dynamics of rigid bodies. Although this course has no lab component, the emphasis will be shared equally between the theoretical and the applied aspects of the physics being studied.
PHYS 322 3 credits
Advanced Electricity and Magnetism
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Phys 222
This course reviews and deepens the concepts discussed in Phys 112 and 222. Maxwell’s equations are examined from several perspectives and the link between them and special relativity is explored. The propagation, reflection, transmission, refraction and polarization of electromagnetic waves is explored.
PHYS 325 3 credits
Fluid Mechanics
Prerequisite(s): Phys 231
Fluid mechanics is undergoing a renaissance with the advent of personal computers. In this course we will examine the fundamental laws of fluid motion and use accompanying software to solve realistic problems.
PHYS 332 3 credits
Analog Electronics
Prerequisite(s): Phys 222
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 342
Phys 332 is an introductory electronic principles and circuit analysis course. This course will cover the following topics: analysis of DC and AC circuits, diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, transistor amplifiers, operational amplifiers, and power supplies. Students enrolling in this course must also take the accompanying lab course, Phys 342, in the same semester.
PHYS 342 3 credits
Analog Electronics Laboratory
Prerequisite(s): Phys 222
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 332
Phys 342 is the laboratory portion of Phys 332. Students enrolling in Phys 342 must in the same semester enrol in Phys 332. This course will introduce and provide the students with experience and practice in wiring and designing circuits, and discuss how passive and active circuit devices are used in circuits, and how to check the circuits by employing the electronic measuring and test equipment used in modern laboratories. The lab computers will be used to check how the actual circuits function in comparison with the computer simulated circuits.
PHYS 351 3 credits
Quantum Mechanics
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Phys 252; Phys 381 (may be taken as a corequisite)
This fundamental course on quantum mechanics is the gateway to modern physics. Schrodinger equation and basic postulates of the theory will be examined. Topics will include angular momentum, hydrogen atom, and perturbation theory.
PHYS 352 3 credits
Special Relativity and Classical Fields
Prerequisite(s): Phys 222 and Phys 252
Einstein’s postulate that no energy or information can travel faster than light had considerable consequences for physics. In this course we apply his theory of special relativity to mechanics, electricity, and magnetism, and introduce his theory of gravity (general relativity).
PHYS 381 3 credits
Mathematical Physics
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Math 211, one of Phys 221 or Math 255, and one of Phys 112 or any second year Math course
This course will give students a wide arsenal of mathematical techniques and tools to increase their ability in setting up and solving problems. The solution of partial differential equations with applications to many areas of physics is the biggest single theme of the course. Also included will be special functions, calculus of variations and integral equations.
Note: Students may obtain credit for either Math 381 or Phys 381, but not both. This course is cross-listed as Math 381.
PHYS 382 3 credits
Modern Physics Lab
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Phys 221, 222, 252
This course allows students to develop skills with extended experiments and projects. Students will have the opportunity to use their own creativity in investigating a variety of modern physics topics.
PHYS 393 3 credits
Computer Algebra Physics I
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 221
This is the first of two courses designed to illustrate how computer algebra systems (CAS) can be used in physics. The emphasis is on using computer algebra methods to form, manipulate, simplify, and plot equations along with its ability to interactively answer “what if” questions. No prior knowledge of any CAS software is assumed or needed.
PHYS 451 3 credits
Advanced Quantum Mechanics
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Physics 351
This course is a continuation from Phys 381, the intermediate quantum mechanics course. The course focuses on the application of quantum mechanics. Topics include one-electron atoms, perturbation theory, variational method, time-dependent perturbation theory, spin, and multi-electron atoms.
PHYS 452 3 credits
Introduction to General Relativity
Prerequisite(s): Phys 352
General relativity is Einstein’s theory of gravitation. It is the first theory that allows the properties of space-time to be determined by the matter contained in the space-time.
PHYS 455 3 credits
Solid State Physics
Prerequisite(s): A course involving PDEs (one of Phys 222 or Phys 381), and a course involving thermodynamics (one of: Phys 231, Phys 381, or Chem 324), and a course involving quantum mechanics (one of: Phys 252, Phys 351, or Chem 224), and a course involving vectors (one of: Math 152, Math 211, or Phys 221)
This course develops the basic principles of metal and semiconductor solids, including crystal and structural properties, phonons, thermal properties, and electrical properties. The course also discusses practical applications including x-ray diffraction, magnetism, and alloying.
PHYS 462 3 credits
Digital Electronics and Comp. Interfacing
Prerequisite(s): Phys 222
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 472
This course emphasizes elementary digital electronics and interfaces. Topics include:  gates and Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, flip-flops, registers, counters and memories,  digital components, microprocessor functions and architecture, instruction sets,  D/A and A/D converters, and waveshaping. Phys 472, the laboratory portion of this course, must be taken concurrently. This course is designed to provide practical experience with the basic digital logic chips and how digital circuits can be interfaced with microprocessors.
PHYS 472 3 credits
Laboratory: Digital Electronics
Prerequisite(s): Phys 222
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 462
Physics 472 is the laboratory portion of the digital electronics course, Physics 462. The experiments done in this course are designed to provide students with practical experience using, testing, and designing digital logic circuits. The experiments are closely related to the material covered in the classroom. This course emphasizes design and assembly of circuits with discrete gates, interfacing these circuits directly to microprocessors, and using industrial production tools for practical applications.
PHYS 481 4 credits
Advanced Mathematical Methods of Physics
Prerequisite(s): Phys 381, Phys 222, Comp 150, one of (Math 221, Math 152)
Working physicists analyze physical systems and model them mathematically. The equations that arise are often complicated, so specific mathematical techniques have been developed over the years to solve them. These solutions then predict the future behaviour of that physical system. This course includes: Bessel functions and associated legendre polynomials and their applications in mechanics, electromagnetism and the hydrogen atom; the calculus of variations, with applications in classical mechanics, optics and classical field theory (with attention to coupled systems); green function techniques; and applications to strings, electromagnetism and heat. Students will work many problems using initially pen and paper, and then with Maple and/or C or FORTRAN. Computers will be used to generate numerical and/or graphical solutions.
PHYS 484 3 credits
Nonlinear Physics
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Phys 221, Phys 381
Corequisite(s): Phys 485
Physics 484 is an integrated physics course designed to introduce students to the exciting world of nonlinear phenomena. Nonlinear physics is at the cutting edge of physics and it may be the penultimate branch of physics. The study of nonlinear physics is important and useful because its models are used in many disciplines, as diverse as business and ecology. This course is designed to integrate the computer’s ability to perform symbolic computations, simulations, equation solving and plotting, and model testing with the classroom theory along with the related laboratory experiments of Phys 485. Topics include nonlinear mechanics, interesting nonlinear systems, methods of solving nonlinear equations, topological analysis, limit cycles, analytical methods, forced oscillations of nonlinear systems, partial nonlinear differential equations, numerical techniques, etc. Access to an IBM-compatible computer will assist students in doing the problems and in understanding the text’s examples.
PHYS 485 3 credits
Nonlinear Physics Laboratory
Developed in partnership with Simon Fraser University
Prerequisite(s): Phys 221, Phys 381
Corequisite(s): Phys 484
Phys 485 is the laboratory portion of Phys 484.
PHYS 493 3 credits
Computer Algebra Physics II
Pre- or corequisite(s): Phys 381; Phys 393
This course extends and augments the problem-solving skills of physics students taught in Physics 393. Problems amenable to solving with computer algebra systems will be emphasized. The problem-solving emphasis will be on the understanding of the physics and the checking whether the solution correctly predicts the correct physical behaviour.
Political Science
POSC 100 3 credits
Introduction to Political Science
Prerequisite(s): None
Introduction to the study of politics, political culture, ideology, and government. Students will develop an understanding of the process of law-making in Canada. Areas in need of reform will be highlighted in order to encourage debate on important current themes. Discussions combined with readings will permit students to form informed opinions about government and politics.
POSC 110 3 credits
Canadian Politics
Prerequisite(s): None
Approaches the study of the governmental structures and institutions of contemporary Canada by considering social, political, and economic factors which have exercised significant influence on their development. Canadian government will be viewed in terms of its dynamic interaction with the broader political environment.
POSC 120 3 credits
Ideology and Politics
Prerequisite(s): None
Political Science 120 provides an examination of Classical Liberalism, Post-War Liberalism, and Neo-Liberalism as well as Red Tory, Democratic Socialist, and Marxist critiques of contemporary society and politics. The course combines the examination of both economic and political doctrines with a view to the understanding of contemporary Canadian and world politics.
POSC 190 3 credits
International Relations
Prerequisite(s): None
A study of aspects of global conflict and world politics. The course provides students with the background necessary for an understanding of sources of power, techniques of wielding influence, and the formulation of foreign policy. The course typically examines international law, economic disparity, human rights and global ecology in the context of international political economy.
POSC 200 3 credits
Introduction to Political Analysis
Prerequisite(s): POSC 120
Introduction to various modes of political analysis, including classical perspectives, political economy and empirical political analysis.
POSC 210 3 credits
Canadian Constitutional Politics
Prerequisite(s): POSC 110
This course will survey Canada’s constitutional “odyssey” from 1763 to the present, with a strong emphasis on the post-Confederation period. More specifically, the course will focus on the efforts to patriate the constitution in the post-World War II era and the political consequences of those efforts. The course will examine the different perspectives on the constitution advocated by the various actors in the Canadian political process — governments, parties, and interest groups. Special attention will be paid to the changing terms of the debate as new actors — women, new Canadians, and Aboriginal peoples — joined the constitutional conversation. Finally, the course will assess where Canada now stands in relation to its constitutional “odyssey” and the most appropriate processes for constitutional reform.
POSC 230 3 credits
Comparative Politics
Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level course in political science
An introduction to the basic structures, processes and policies of modern governments through an examination of foreign governments.
POSC 270 3 credits
Introduction to Political Theory
Prerequisite(s): POSC 120 or Phil 110 or Phil 130 or Crim 130
Introduction to the activity of political theory and the history of political thought.
Note: POSC 270 is the same as Phil 210. Although transferability may differ, credit cannot be obtained for both POSC 270 and Phil 210 at UCFV.
POSC 290 3 credits
International Organizations
(formerly POSC 195)
Prerequisite(s): POSC 190
This course examines the history and present status of international and regional governmental and non-governmental organizations which act in the international arena. Emphasis will be placed on organizations such as the United Nations, the European Community, OPEC, Amnesty International, and NATO, as well as multinational corporations.
POSC 310 3 credits
Canadian Federalism
Prerequisite(s): POSC 110 or POSC 210
Corequisite(s): None
This course will examine the origin and development of federalism in Canada from 1867 to the present. The course will focus on the difficulties of creating and managing a social welfare state in a federal political system. Particular attention will be paid to the challenge of dividing and sharing fiscal resources. Special attention will also be devoted to how the various mega-constitutional orientations present in Canada affect the operation of the federal political system. The course will conclude with an examination with the challenge of incorporating municipal and aboriginal governments into the federal system and the concomitant idea of multilevel governance. Finally, we shall examine the relationship between democracy and federalism.
POSC 311 3 credits
History of Political Thought I: Plato to Luther
Prerequisite(s): POSC 120 or POSC 270 or Phil 210
History of Western political thought from Classical Greece through the Italian Renaissance. The course will focus on the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Ciccero, Augustine, Aquinas, and Macchiavelli.
POSC 312 3 credits
History of Political Thought II: Protestant Reformation to 1900
Prerequisite(s): POSC 311
History of Western political thought from the Protestant Reformation through the 19th century. The course will focus on the writing of Luther, Calvin, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Bentham, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche.
POSC 320 3 credits
Canadian Political Thought
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Science, or Applied programs, including two of POSC 110, POSC 120, POSC 190, POSC 290, POSC 230, POSC 270
This course will introduce students to many of the major political ideas and theorists that have shaped the intellectual landscape of this country. It will introduce students to such ideas/theorists in an historical manner; the course will finish with a discussion of some of the major issues before us at the present time.
POSC 330 3 credits
Human Rights: Theory and History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of Philosophy or Political Science, including one of the following: POSC 120 or POSC 190 or POSC 290 or POSC 270 or Phil 110 or Phil 210 or Phil 230
The language of human rights is woven into the fabric of our culture, society, and political discourse. This course will examine different notions of rights and responsibilities, and the history of these ideas as they are embodied in various organizations and institutions.
POSC 335 3 credits
Civil Liberties and the Charter in Canada
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Science or Applied programs, including POSC 110
A study of the relationship between the government and individual liberty in Canada. The focus is upon the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its interpretation by our judiciary. Examination of the issues of equality before the law, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, hate literature and obscenity. Consideration of the rights of incarcerated individuals and the rights of individuals designated as mentally disordered.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both POSC 335 and Crim 335.
POSC 410 3 credits
Intergovernmental Relations in Canada
Prerequisite(s): POSC 210 and POSC 310
This course will provide a detailed examination of the processes of intergovernmental relations in Canada. While the theory of federalism posits that there should be two orders of government each with their own sphere of jurisdiction, the practice of federalism in Canada entails considerable intergovernmental collaboration. Almost every policy sector has a federal–provincial interface, which for the most part is managed by a legion of civil servants. A central proposition of this course is that executive federalism is alive and well in Canada. We will evaluate the processes of executive federalism and to consider the ramifications of managing the federation through these processes.
POSC 482 3 credits
Selected Topics in Canadian Politics
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Sciences, or Applied programs, including one of: POSC 311, POSC 312, Phil 305, Phil 310, Phil 315
The study of Canadian politics is a complex and detailed process. This course goes beyond what is covered in introductory courses and allows students to increase their knowledge through the advanced study of one or more topics in Canadian politics.
POSC 482C 3 credits
Readings in Canadian Democracy
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Sciences, or Applied programs, including one of: POSC 311, POSC 312, Phil 305, Phil 310, Phil 315
see course description for POSC 482
POSC 482D 3 credits
Readings in Queer Politics
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits from Arts, Sciences, or Applied programs, including one of: POSC 311, POSC 312, Phil 305, Phil 310, Phil 315
see course description for POSC 482
POSC 490 3 credits
Directed Studies in Political Thought
Prerequisite(s): Twelve credits of Philosophy or Political Science, and written consent of both the faculty member and the department head
This course offers the student the opportunity to pursue in depth independent study of a particular issue, problem or topic in the areas of political thought. The student must, in consultation with a faculty member, develop a detailed individual course proposal indicating the readings or other study to be undertaken and how the course work will be assessed.
POSC 491 3 credits
Directed Studies in Politics
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of Political Science, and written consent of both the faculty member and the department head
This course offers students the opportunity to pursue in-depth independent study of a particular issue, problem, or topic in any area of politics. The student must, in consultation with a faculty member, develop a detailed individual course proposal indicating the readings or other study to be undertaken and how the course work will be assessed.
Practical Nursing
PNUR 100 2 credits
Health I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Practical Nursing program
Corequisite(s): PNUR 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106
This course introduces learners to the concept of health as a dynamic, non-static process. Viewed within the context of Canadian society, health is seen as a holistic process on which our daily choices have a significant effect. The integration of body, mind, and spirit will be examined in order to develop an appreciation for the idea that everything we do, think, feel, and believe has an impact on our health. This course will examine six dimensions of the individual’s health, each of which impacts well-being. Growth and development theory and health promotion strategies will be reviewed across the lifespan.
PNUR 101 1.5 credits
Healing I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Practical Nursing program
Corequisite(s): PNUR 100, PNUR 102, PNUR 103, PNUR 104, PNUR 105, PNUR 106
This course will provide learners with an opportunity to explore healing as a holistic process. Common challenges associated with healing will be discussed as they impact the healing process. Students will examine complementary approaches to healing. The particular needs of persons with physical and mental disabilities will be explored, including discussion of common challenges for the disabled, the role of public and social environments, and community resources. This course will also provide an introduction to principles of primary health care and basic pharmacology as resources to healing.
PNUR 102 1 credit
Human Relationships I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Practical Nursing program
Corequisite(s): PNUR 100, PNUR 101, PNUR 103, PNUR 104, PNUR 105, PNUR 106
This course will provide learners with an opportunity to explore the concept of caring as it applies to the development of human relationships. The development of helping relationships will be discussed with particular emphasis on the application of effective interpersonal skills. Group communication skills will be addressed as they relate to elements of group process. Students will also examine and practice the adaptation of communication skills with persons with physical and/or mental disabilities.
PNUR 103 0.5 credits
Professional Growth I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Practical Nursing program
Corequisite(s): PNUR 100, 101, 102, 104, 105, and 106
This course introduces learners to the evolution and position of practical nursing as a health profession within the health care system. It focuses on the legal, ethical, and philosophical bases for practice. The PN role, interdisciplinary team, partnership, delegation, reporting, and documenting will be discussed. This course also explores reflective writing and critical thinking skills.
PNUR 104 3.5 credits
Nursing Arts I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Practical Nursing program
Corequisite(s): PNUR 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 106
This course introduces learners to the nursing process and basic nursing skills. The classroom and laboratory components will assist learners to acquire the basic knowledge and skill of nursing assessments, promotion of independence, activity, comfort, and personal care skills. This course is intended to help learners integrate theory in selected client care situations. Organizational skills, safety to practice, and communication skills are addressed.
PNUR 105 2.5 credits
Clinical Practice I
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 104
This clinical practice course will provide learners with an opportunity to integrate theory from Semester I into practice. Learners will gain experience caring for clients with health challenges in a variety of community agencies. Placement experiences will include extended care, community living agencies/programs for persons with disabilities, and health promotion programs for the older adult.
PNUR 106 1.5 credits
Human Anatomy and Physiology
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Practical Nursing program
Corequisite(s): PNUR 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105
This course provides students with a review of each of the body systems. The structure and function of each of the systems will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on an understanding of the interrelationship amongst the body systems. As each body system is presented, various health promotion strategies will be discussed that support optimal health.
PNUR 110 1.5 credits
Health II
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 105
Corequisite(s): PNUR 111, 112, 114, 115
Society is bombarded with a variety of myths, stereotypes, and prejudices related to aging. This course will present a discussion of aging through a review of the aging process and theories of aging. In particular, it will examine the demographic profile of the older adult, the aging family, personal adjustments required by the aging individual, and available community resources. Geropharmacology forms the basis for understanding the older adult’s vulnerability to medications. Health promotion and wellness in the older adult will also be addressed.
PNUR 111 1.5 credits
Healing II
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 105
Corequisite(s): PNUR 110, 112, 114, 115
This course will provide learners with the opportunity to examine the unique health issues for the gerontological client. Students will study age-related illnesses including psychogeriatric disorders. The nursing process will be applied to the various health challenges associated with aging. The care of the gerontological client will be reviewed as well as discussion of the levels and context of care for the older adult. This course will also explore the legal and ethical considerations related to gerontological nursing.
PNUR 112 1 credit
Human Relationships II
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 105
Corequisite(s): PNUR 110, 111, 114, 115
This course will focus on effective communication with the older adult, including characteristics of the older adult that affect communication between nurse and client. Students will explore how to adapt communication techniques. A review of the specific needs of the mentally fragile older adult will direct exploration of professional attitudes and communication strategies that support a therapeutic relationship. In addition, discussion of group communication with older adults will provide an opportunity for students to identify effective leadership skills and explore the positive impact of group work for the older adult. Development of collaboration skills will also be addressed in relation to students’ working relationships with members of the health care team.
PNUR 114 3 credits
Nursing Arts II
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 105
Corequisite(s): PNUR 110, 111, 112, 115
This course focuses on the development of practical nursing skills that promote health and healing for the older adult. Clients are viewed from a holistic perspective based on an accurate and comprehensive assessment of their unique needs. Students will utilize the nursing process as they adapt nursing interventions to the older adult. Communication skills and responsibility and accountability will be emphasized throughout this course. Laboratory and selected clinical experiences will promote integration of theory to practice.
PNUR 115 5 credits
Clinical Practice II
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 114
This clinical practice course is intended to provide learners with an opportunity to apply theory to the care of older adults in residential facilities. Students will be assigned resident care responsibilities in a long term care facility. The experience will focus on the development of nursing care abilities within a gerontological context.
PNUR 120 1 credit
Health III
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 115
Corequisite(s): PNUR 121, 123, 124, 125
This course focuses on the promotion of health for individuals across the lifespan in acute care. Students will be introduced to a variety of acute care programs. Discharge planning will be examined in relation to the patient situation and specific nursing care considerations. Students will have an opportunity to examine documentation requirements for the acute care setting. Teaching and learning theory will be reviewed with particular focus on the practical nurse’s role with client education. In addition, this course will provide an overview of maternal-child care with emphasis on the care of the post-partum client and newborn.
PNUR 121 2 credits
Healing III
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 115
Corequisite(s): PNUR 120, 123, 124, 125
This course will explore the promotion of healing across the lifespan for individuals experiencing acute and/or chronic illness. Students will discuss the differentiation between acute and chronic illness as it relates to the client’s illness experience. Common health problems for medical and surgical clients will be addressed for each of the body systems, including a discussion of pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and nursing interventions. Students will utilize the nursing process in planning client care. In addition, this course will review psychosocial challenges that may be experienced by the acute care client.
PNUR 123 0.5 credits
Professional Issues
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 115
Corequisite(s): PNUR 120, 121, 124, 125
This course will address professional practice issues that will assist learners in preparing for the transition from practical nursing student to Licensed Practical Nurse. Discussion of the role of the practical nurse in relation to other members of the health care team will foster an understanding of the independent and interdependent functions of the practical nurse. Collaboration, advocacy, and partnership are concepts critical to the role of the professional nurse. Standards of practice, and professional and union affiliations will be discussed, as well as change theory and lifelong learning.
PNUR 124 4 credits
Nursing Arts III
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 115
Corequisite(s): PNUR 120, 121, 123, 125
This course emphasizes the development of nursing skills for the promotion of healing for individuals requiring acute care nursing. Building on the theory and practice from semesters I & II, students will utilize the nursing process while integrating new knowledge and technical skills relevant to acute care. Comprehensive assessment skills will form the basis for the recognition and reporting of client data. Opportunities for client teaching will be discussed. Communication skills and responsibility and accountability will be applied throughout this course. The laboratory and acute care setting will provide the opportunity for integration of theory to practice.
PNUR 125 4 credits
Clinical Practice III
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 124
This clinical practice course provides learners with acute care nursing experience. This experience will facilitate the student’s ability to integrate theory and develop knowledge related to the care of individuals with acute and chronic illness. Students will be placed on adult medical and surgical nursing units. Selection of client care experiences will be based on client acuity and complexity.
PNUR 135 5 credits
Preceptorship
Prerequisite(s): PNUR 125
The preceptorship experience is designed to provide learners with an opportunity to complete the transition from student practical nurse to graduate practical nurse. During the experience, students will be assigned a preceptor who will assist them to gradually assume responsibility for entry-level LPN practice. Program faculty will collaborate with the preceptor and the student to facilitate the preceptorship experience.
Psychology
Note on prerequisites: Unless stated otherwise, the minimum grade acceptable in all course prerequisites is a C-.
PSYC 101 3 credits
Introduction to Psychology I
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or higher OR Engl 099 with a C or higher OR Engl 081 or 091 with a C+ or higher OR success in a previous university-transfer English course OR English 12 with a B or higher
This course introduces students to the field of psychology and its research methods, and surveys the basic perspectives of psychology with respect to learning, memory, thought, child development, sensation and perception, and physiology.
PSYC 102 3 credits
Introduction to Psychology II
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101
This course is a continuation of Psyc 101. The content areas of emotion, motivation, personality, social influence, psychological disorders, and psychological testing are covered.
PSYC 110 3 credits
Statistical Analysis in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Math 11 or equivalent
This course covers basic techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications to psychological research. Methods of graphing, measures of central tendency, dispersion, relationships, and various parametric and distribution-free tests are included.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Psyc 110 and Psyc 201 (previously offered)
PSYC 200 3 credits
Topics and Issues in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101
This course is designed for non-Psychology major students who would like to take an elective in Psychology. The topics covered in the course may vary from year to year depending on the instructor. Check with the Psychology Department for more information.
PSYC 202 4 credits
Research Methods in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102
Pre- or corequisite(s): Psyc 110 or Math 104 or Math 106
This course will examine the following topics: ethics in research; scientific writing for APA; experimental, descriptive, quasi-experimental, and developmental research designs; an introduction to measurement in Psychology; descriptive and inferential statistics; and generalization and interpretation of research results. Students will be required to conduct and write up one piece of original research on a psychological topic.
PSYC 221 3 credits
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102
This course surveys several important sub-areas of cognitive psychology including pattern recognition, attention, memory, category formation, imagery, problem solving, expertise and creativity, language, and decision making. Students will be introduced to many classic issues and landmark experiments in these areas, and will explore the research literature in specific topics of their choice.
PSYC 241 3 credits
Psychological Disorders
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102
This course surveys basic theory and research in abnormal psychology. Behavioural, cognitive, psychoanalytic, biopsychological, and humanistic perspectives are used to explore various clinical disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, sociopathy, and others. Assessment and treatment of disorders are also included.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both PSYC 241 and PSYC 341 (previously offered).
PSYC 250 3 credits
Introduction to Developmental Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102
This course introduces students to the study of human development across the lifespan. The course will cover the major theories of human development and changes that occur during the lifespan in the areas of cognitive, perceptual, social, and emotional development.
PSYC 280 3 credits
Biological Bases of Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102
This course is an introduction to the relationship between brain and behaviour. Topics include an overview of the nervous system and the neural basis of complex behaviours.
PSYC 301 3 credits
Intermediate Research Methods and Data Analysis in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 202; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course is a continuation of the second-year research methods course. It will provide extensions of basic theory and methods of research design and data analysis. Discussion will include the analysis of substantive problems, the choice of appropriate research designs and special problems that arise in the analysis of psychological data.
PSYC 302 3 credits
Learning
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 202 or Psyc 221; or Psyc 210 and 220
In this course, students will study prominent learning processes including habituation, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, modelling, concept formation, and analogical inference. Learning issues related to discrimination, generalization, biological constraints on learning, and reinforcement will be discussed in the context of human and animal learning. Students will be encouraged to apply the content of this course to the general problem of designing human educational learning programs.
PSYC 303 3 credits
Perception
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 202 , Psyc 221 or Psyc 280; or Psyc 210 and Psyc 220
This course explores the question of how we create an internal representation of the external world from the information provided by our sensory systems. Specific topics covered include reading, speech, perception, recognition of faces and facial expressions, and perception of art and music.
PSYC 305 3 credits
The Psychology of Gender
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102, and one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course will look at the research on gender issues in a variety of subfields of psychology, including developmental, cognitive, abnormal, social, personality, psycholinguistics, and biopsychology. The course is designed for the senior student with an interest in gender issues, but not necessarily a broad base in psychology.
PSYC 306 3 credits
Psychological Assessment
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102; one of Psyc 110 or Math 104 or Math 106; one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210, and Psyc 220
Provides an introduction to the purpose, scope, and mechanics of psychological testing and assessment. Topics include theoretical issues in assessment, methodology of administering tests, statistics, assessment for specific populations, and an overview of currently used assessment instruments.
PSYC 325 3 credits
Memory
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 202 or Psyc 221; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course introduces students to the major areas of memory research. Topics studied include sensory, short-term, working, and semantic memory, as well as encoding strategies, retrieval cues, amnesia, state dependent learning, and mnemonics.
PSYC 326 3 credits
Psychology of Consciousness
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 221; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course is a systematic study of consciousness from both theoretical and applied points of view in Psychology. Topics include the role of consciousness in the history of Psychology; research on states of consciousness (e.g., dreaming, hypnosis, meditation, fantasy); research and theory on the relationship between brain and consciousness; and therapeutic use of cultivated states of consciousness.
PSYC 343 3 credits
Psychology of Health
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102, and one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course presents a blend of basic theory and research along with clinical perspectives and interventions in Health Psychology. An expanded biopsychosocial systems perspective is presented and used to study psychological factors in health and illness. Topics include models and psychophysiological mechanisms of stress; applicable research designs; personality and health; psychological treatments for stress related disorders; lifestyle and health behaviours; and social and societal factors in health and health care.
PSYC 351 3 credits
Child Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 250, and one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course considers the psychological aspects of human development from conception through to adolescence. It covers the changes in the areas of physical, perceptual, language, emotional, social, and cognitive development.
PSYC 355 3 credits
Adolescent Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 250, one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and Psyc 220
This course considers the psychological aspects of human development during the period of adolescence. Changes in the areas of physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development will be covered.
PSYC 357 3 credits
Adulthood and Aging
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 250, one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and Psyc 220
This course considers human development from young adulthood to old age. Topics include theories of adult development and aging, environmental and biological factors in aging, and the effects of aging on sensation, perception, learning, cognition, personality, psychopathology, and social relations.
PSYC 360 3 credits
Social Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102, one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and Psyc 220
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a broad overview of the field of Social Psychology. The course focuses on social psychological theory and findings. Topics may include how individuals view the social world, how individuals make inferences about others, how attitudes are formed and changed, and social relations.
Note: Credits cannot be obtained for both Psyc 360 and Psyc 260 (previously offered).
PSYC 367 3 credits
Psychology of Language
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102, and one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and 220
Language is intrinsically interesting, but also particularly relevant to psychologists. Experiments rely upon language to convey instructions and collect data, while therapeutic interventions rely on communication between psychologist and client. Topics covered in this course will be drawn from many areas of Psychology as well as other disciplines in an attempt to understand the complex nature of human language. Specific topics include linguistics theories, animal language, sign language, neural mechanisms of language, language production and comprehension, multilingualism and social context of language.
PSYC 370 3 credits
Introduction to Personality Theory
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102, and one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course introduces students to the work of prominent personality theorists from Sigmund Freud to modern theorists. The focus of study will progress from Freud to Carl Jung, Henry Murray, Eric Erikson, social learning theorists, and humanists.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both Psyc 370 and Psyc 270 (previously offered).
PSYC 375 3 credits
Fundamentals of Clinical Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 241, and one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course examines both professional issues and selected topics in the discipline of Clinical Psychology. Educational and training issues and requirements, history of the field, career options, and work issues will be studied. Professional ethical guidelines, ethical decision making, and applications will be introduced, as will Canadian issues. Depending on the instructor, the course will either survey assessment, interventions and research in Clinical Psychology, or focus on a specific topic, such as interventions, the therapeutic relationship, the history of psychotherapy, or comparative cultural systems of intervention.
PSYC 380 3 credits
Human Neuropsychology
(formerly Psyc 491A)
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 280; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course is an examination of both clinical and experimental neuropsychology, which is based on case studies of patients with damage to the nervous system. Topics include the assessment of cognitive and behavioural functions such as memory, language, spatial skills; the nature of neurodegenerative diseases and other forms of neuropathology (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, multi-infarct dementia); the treatment of brain pathology (still almost impossible, but a rapidly growing research area); and the application of information gained through the study of patients to the understanding of non-pathological (that is, ‘normal’) brains.
PSYC 383 3 credits
Drugs and Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 280, and one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and 220
This course covers the basics of psychopharmacology, with an emphasis on understanding neural communication and how this is related to human behaviour. Topics include how neurotransmitters work, how drugs affect neurotransmitters, the relationship between neurotransmitters and behaviour, hormones and behaviour, neurochemical deficits in neurodegenerative disease and psychopathy, and theories of addiction.
PSYC 386 3 credits
Social Psychology of Groups
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 101, Psyc 102, one of Psyc 202, Crim 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or Psyc 210 and Psyc 220
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a broad overview of the social psychology of groups. The course focuses on social psychological theory, methodology, and findings. Topics will include group cohesion and development, power, leadership, and performance.
PSYC 408 3 credits
History of Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Psyc 202; or Psyc 210 and 220, 15 credits of upper-level psychology
This course concentrates on the past 125 years of development in the field of Psychology. The major schools and systems of thought will be presented and the outstanding figures within each school or system will be described. Links between psychological systems of thought and broader intellectual and social currents will be examined.
PSYC 491 3 credits
Selected Topics in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission
This seminar course critically reviews theory, methods, and research results in s selected sub-field of Psychology. Students should check with the Psychology Department to determine the content area and prerequisites for a particular semester.
PSYC 493A 3 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Department’s permission
This is an independent reading and research in topics course, selected in consultation with a supervising instructor.
Note: Students who have already completed a directed studies course in Psychology should register under Psyc 493B. Students cannot register in either Psyc 493A or Psyc 493B without first filling out a contract with the instructor.
PSYC 493B 3 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Department’s permission, major in Psychology
This is an independent reading and research in topics course, selected in consultation with a supervising instructor. This course is designed for students who wish to engage in directed studies further to those completed in Psyc 493A.
Note: Students cannot register in either Psyc 493A or Psyc 493B without first filling out a contract with the instructor.
Punjabi
PUNJ 210 3 credits
Intermediate Punjabi I
Prerequisite(s): Familiarity with spoken modern Punjabi language is essential for success in this course.
This course is an introduction to Punjabi (Gurmukhi) script and enhances previous knowledge of modern Punjabi language. It deals with the important grammatical features of Standard Punjabi and its syntax and morphology. The course is restricted to students with familiarity with spoken contemporary Punjabi, but no or little knowledge of reading and writing Gurmukhi Script.
PUNJ 211 3 credits
Intermediate Punjabi II
Prerequisite(s): Punj 210
This course is a continuation of Punj 210, and provides further study of the Punjabi (Gurmukhi) script and modern Punjabi language. It deals with the important grammatical features of Standard Punjabi and its syntax and morphology. The course is restricted to students with familiarity with spoken contemporary Punjabi, but limited knowledge of reading and writing Gurmukhi Script.
Reading and Study Skills
See Academic Support — CSM 108, page 230.
RSS 098 3 credits
Introduction to Reading and Study Skills
Prerequisite(s): Admission to either the CTC Health & Human Services, or Adventure Tourism certificate programs
This introductory reading and study skills course is designed specifically for students in the Health & Human Services and Adventure Tourism programs at CTC. Students will learn basic speed reading techniques and writing skills to facilitate comprehension of their textbooks. In addition, program content material will be used as a basis for learning preliminary study strategies.
Religious Studies
Additional courses in Religious Studies
The following courses also contain Religious Studies content. See the Anthropology and Philosophy sections for course descriptions:
ANTH 130 — World Religions
ANTH 469 — Myth and Ritual
PHIL 240 — Faith and Reason: Philosophy of Religion
RLST 201 3 credits
Religions of the West
Prerequisite(s): Anth 130
An examination of the religions of the Western tradition using their scriptures and other readings, lectures, discussions, and films. Judaism, Christianity and Islam will be considered in depth, and Wicca and New Age as response or counterpoint.
RLST 202 3 credits
Religions of the East
Prerequisite(s): Anth 130
An examination of the religions of the Eastern tradition using their scriptures and other readings, lectures, discussions, and films. Hinduism, Buddhism and Confucianism-Taoism will be considered in depth, Jainism, Sikhism and Shintoism will also be examined. We will also explore the impact of the Eastern tradition on the western tradition.
RLST 330 3 credits
The Christian Tradition
Prerequisite(s): Anth 130 or Religious Studies 201 or Phil 250
A critical and historical examination of the evolution of the Christian tradition, its contribution to western society, and its impact on the cultures and creeds of other parts of the world. Interactions with Judaism, Islam, and Buddhism will be explored. The course will be divided into (a) a historical overview of the evolution of the Christian community and (b) a discussion of the major issues facing Christianity at the end of the second millennium.
Russian
RUSS 101 3 credits
Russian Language I
Prerequisite(s): None
Introduces the Russian language by an intensive study of the Cyrillic alphabet, the case and verb system, and essential vocabulary. Through the use of various audio/visual techniques to avoid translation, we teach you to speak, understand, read and write Russian by directly associating a visual idea with its verbal expression in Russian. Dialogues and conversations are placed within everyday situations to emphasize the “creative” aspects of learning Russian. Considerable time is spent discussing life in the former Soviet Union to familiarize you with Russian culture. There is extensive use of the multimedia laboratory.
RUSS 102 3 credits
Russian Language II
Prerequisite(s): Russ 101, or instructor’s permission
Continues to develop your ability to express yourself in oral and written Russian. It is sequential to Russ 101.
RUSS 201 3 credits
Intermediate Russian I
Prerequisite(s): Russ 101 and 102, or instructor’s permission
Reviews the important elements of Russian grammar studied in the first year, concentrating on the case and verb system. It develops your command of both oral and written Russian and introduces certain simplified texts for literary study. Films and slides are used to enrich the cultural content of the course. There is extensive use of the multimedia laboratory.
RUSS 202 3 credits
Intermediate Russian II
Prerequisite(s): Russ 201, or instructor’s permission
This course, sequential to Russ 201, is designed to continue the development of the study of the Russian language begun in the previous course.
RUSS 251 3 credits
19th Century Russian Literature in English
Prerequisite(s): None
Introduces you to the richness of 19th century Russian society through its authors and their works. We take seven major authors of the period, such as Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Chekhov, and Pushkin, and read selected works translated into English. These literary masterpieces are studied within the context of the historical, sociological, and philosophical development of Russian society.
RUSS 252 3 credits
20th Century Russian Literature in English
Prerequisite(s): None
In this course, we try to understand the development of Russian society since the revolution by examining major works of seven post-revolutionary writers, including Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, Zamyatin, and Sholokhov. Some are pro-Soviet and some are biased against the changes in Russia since 1917, but all are fascinating reading. We read these works in English in an attempt to understand what has happened historically and politically in Russia in the last eight decades.
RUSS 311 4 credits
Advanced Russian Composition and Conversation
Prerequisite(s): Russian 202
This course refines the students’ abilities in oral and written Russian by reviewing essential elements of grammar, stylistics, and conversation. Readings will include both classic and modern selections. There is extensive use of the multimedia laboratory and Russian websites.
RUSS 321 4 credits
Advanced Russian Language and Literature
Prerequisite(s): Russian 202
This course develops the students’ command of Russian with a focus on language in context, be it literary or media-based. The focus on literature will include some short Russian literary masterpieces. There is extensive use of the multimedia laboratory and Russian websites.
RUSS 351 4 credits
Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky in English
Prerequisite(s): Either Russian 251/252 or a second-year English course
This course focuses on the major works of L.N. Tolstoy and F.M. Dostoyevsky, two of the greatest writers and thinkers of 19th century Russia, whose ideas have influenced the development of modern thought around the world. Their works will be examined in English as examples of great literature within their social and historical context.
RUSS 352 4 credits
Bulgakov, Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn
Prerequisite(s): Either Russian 251/252 or a second-year English course
This course concentrates in English on the works of three courageous writers who dared to express ideas that were not acceptable to the Soviet regime. These works will be examined as examples of great literature within their social and historical context.
Note: One of these literature in translation courses may be taken as part of an English major. Refer to the BA — English major requirements for details.
Science
SCI 061 4 credits
Fundamental Science
Prerequisite(s): individual CCP assessment
This course consists of three introductory units in chemistry, biology, and earth science.
SCI 400 3 credits
The History and Philosophy of Science
Prerequisite(s): 60 university-level credits applicable to the BSc
This course examines what science is, what it is not, how it has become what it is, and where it is going. It is designed to help you put science and your own goals into perspective by giving you an understanding of the ways in which science influences and is influenced by the society and world around it, and of the consequences for your own role as scientists. We will examine the trends and the tensions in the development of scientific theories, and the different perspectives on what science is about. We will consider the responsibilities of science and scientists to society, including issues raised by feminism and the environment.
Social Work
SOWK 110 3 credits
Introduction to Social Work and Human Services
(formerly SSSW 110)
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or eligibility to take CMNS 155 or Engl 105
This course will provide students with a critical analysis of social service and social work practice and client needs at local, provincial and federal levels, it will emphasise the role of the professional and para-professional in the service delivery system and the basic structure and function of social service agencies. An introduction to ethical issues will be included. Students will be expected to study in depth at least one social problem area and its concomitant social services.
SOWK 210 3 credits
Introduction to Social Welfare
(formerly SSSW 210)
Prerequisite(s): SOWK 110, or instructor’s permission
This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of social welfare principles and policies in Canada. Beginning with an historical review of social welfare, the student will develop a critical analysis of the context of social welfare including the political, economic, and ideological realities and an understanding of how these realities influence the way in which social problems are identified and addressed.
SOWK 225 3 credits
Human Behaviour & Social Environment
(formerly HSER 125)
Pre- or corequisite(s): SOWK 110. Psyc 101 recommended
This course emphasizes a critique of theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social development, including theories and knowledge about the range of social systems in which individuals live and diversity of human behaviour throughout the life cycle. Students will develop an understanding of the interactions between and among biophysical, social, psychological, and cultural systems as they affect human development. The impact of various social and economic forces, including forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination, are examined as they affect human development and act to promote or deter optimal health and well-being.
SOWK 300 3 credits
Social Work Practice with Individuals
(formerly SSSW 300)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program
This course provides an introduction to the knowledge and competencies underlying generalist social work practice. Students will develop assessment and intervention skills as they relate to working in a human service organization. Advocacy on behalf of clients and skills in brokering of services will also be developed.
SOWK 301 3 credits
Social Work Practice with Groups
(formerly SSSW 301)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program and SOWK 300, or 45 credits in Human Services or Arts programs
This course is designed to give students an understanding of group dynamics, experience in group facilitation and an understanding of the group process in relationship to social work process. Sociocultural forces, legal and ethical issues, and values unique to working with groups will be explored. This course will introduce skills and techniques as they pertain to types of groups and group phases.
SOWK 311 3 credits
Social Work Theory & Ethics
(formerly SSSW 311)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program and SOWK 210, or permission of Instructor
A critical examination of social work theories will include an understanding of ideologies and their relevance to social work practice, including the social construction of theory. Generalist social work practice from several theoretical perspectives will be discussed. This course offers a critical examination of issues including ethical behaviour, accountability, boundary setting, and the intersection of personal and professional values. Students will be expected to articulate and integrate professional values in their emerging social work practice.
Note: Students who have taken SSSW 315 cannot receive further credit for SOWK 311.
Note: SOWK 311 replaces SSSW 310 and SSSW 315.
SOWK 312 3 credits
Legal Knowledge for Social Work Practice
(formerly SSSW 312)
Prerequisite(s): SOWK 110 and 210, or CYC 201 and 210, and admission into the BSW or CYC degree program. (Students in other degree programs, with a minimum of 45 credits, may be able to obtain instructor’s permission at the first class. However, they should check with their program head to see whether they can apply this course to their degree)
This course uses a critical perspective to introduce students to law and related social policies relevant to social work and child and youth care practice. Students will examine law as an expression of social policy in areas such as human rights, child welfare, family law, domestic violence, youth justice, mental health, social assistance, adult guardianship, and privacy. The course addresses procedural fairness and statutory frameworks, with an emphasis on the role of law, the structure of the courts, professional codes of ethics, and legal accountability and liability, particularly as these affect vulnerable and marginalized populations.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both SOWK 312 and CYC 350.
SOWK 320 3 credits
Anti-Racist and Cross Cultural Social Work Knowledge and Practice
(formerly SSSW 320)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program or permission of Director
Pre- or corequisite(s): SOWK 311
This course is intended to introduce students to the knowledge, theories and skills necessary for social work practice in diverse cultural settings. Within a framework that incorporates an anti-oppressive perspective and a critical analysis of social justice and inclusion, this course engages students in self-reflection and an exploration of their own experiences, knowledge, beliefs and attitudes about race, culture and ethnicity. This course involves students in an examination of various theories and practice frameworks required for anti-racist social work practice. Historical and current events, policies and social work practices affecting ethno-cultural groups and marginalized peoples will be analyzed and critiqued.
SOWK 330 6 credits
Practicum I
(formerly SSSW 330)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program, SOWK 300, SOWK 311
Pre- or corequisite(s): SOWK 312
This is a three day per week supervised practicum in a multi-disciplinary setting, for a total of 15 weeks and the completion of 315 practicum hours. Students are also required to participate in a bi-weekly seminar class that will focus on the integration of theory and practice.
Note: A criminal records review is required before placement. The existence of certain kinds of criminal records will preclude placement.
SOWK 380 3 credits
Community Development
(formerly SSSW 380)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program and SOWK 311
This course will focus on the role of the social worker engaged in making change at the community level. Beginning with an understanding of community and social change, students will develop theoretical and practice perspectives on engaging the community in the process of collective action. Fundamental to this process is pursuing the democratic redistribution of power and resources. In constructing an anti-oppressive approach to community development, students will be encouraged to examine the impact of race, class, gender and sexual orientation.
SOWK 392 3 credits
First Nations Social Work
(formerly SSSW 392)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program (Students in other degree programs, with a minimum of 45 credits, may be able to obtain instructor’s permission at the first class. However, they should check with their program head to see whether they can apply this course to their degree)
The purpose of this course is to examine theories and methods of social work practice used by and for Aboriginal people within contemporary society. Historical issues, including colonialism, will be reviewed and the effects of these issues on Aboriginal peoples today will be examined. Other topics include: current methods of intervention; roles and operations of social services in Aboriginal communities; conventional and alternative approaches to social work; and the impact of the media on social work policy and practice with Aboriginal peoples. Self-exploration and self-disclosure will facilitate students’ integration of culturally-sensitive theory and practice into their practice frameworks. The role of helper within the community context will be developed with an emphasis on the principle of “healing” (individuals, families and communities).
SOWK 394 3 credits
Substance Misuse Issues
(formerly SSSW 394)
Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including Psyc 101, or instructor’s permission
This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of the nature of substance use/misuse and addictive behaviours. Students will explore various theoretical perspectives of substance use. Topics include an overview of psychoactive drugs, the use/misuse/abuse continuum, the social costs of addictions, social issues around addiction, and prevention and treatment of addictions. There will be an emphasis on issues related to gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, harm reduction and age. The particular focus of social work and related professions in the continuum of care will also be examined. Students are expected to actively participate in class.
SOWK 404 3 credits
Research Methods and Evaluation
(formerly SSSW 404)
Prerequisite(s): SOWK 330, and either Math 104 or Math 106 or Psyc 110 (or equivalent)
This course will cover scientific methods and their application to social work practice and research. Also included will be strategies and skills appropriate to evaluation of social work interventions and programs. Learners will be expected to read and analyze social work research with a critical focus. Learners can expect to develop a beginning competence in the design and implementation of social work research. Skills in accessing computer-based information will be examined.
SOWK 410 3 credits
Social Welfare Policy and Practice
(formerly SSSW 410)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program; and SOWK 311 and SOWK 330 or permission of the instructor
This course examines the dynamics of social welfare policy and social work practice with diverse populations. Students analyze social issues, policies and policy development processes in the postmodern capitalist state and study how these are affected by political and bureaucratic decisions, the media, citizens, communities and a variety of interest groups. The role of the social worker in developing policy that promotes social justice is also examined.
SOWK 412 3 credits
Legal Skills for Social Work Practice
(formerly SSSW 412)
Prerequisite(s): CYC 310A & B, or SOWK 330; and CYC 350 or SOWK 312. Enrollment in this course is restricted to CYC and BSW students in the Child Welfare specialization.
This course focuses on both the development and demonstration of statutory social work practice skills in child welfare, youth criminal justice, and family court counselling. Students learn and demonstrate skills related to the various mandates that govern their work as professional social workers. The course involves experiential learning related to dispute resolution, advocacy, and legal skills such as investigation, evidence-giving, and report writing. Fundamental to practicing these skills is an understanding of empowerment, partnership, working across differences, and individual and systemic change. The course uses a critical perspective and promotes an understanding of the strengths and limitations of these skills and the legal system.
SOWK 430 9 credits
Practicum II
(formerly SSSW 430)
Prerequisite(s): SOWK 320, SOWK 330, SOWK 404, SOWK 410. Students in the Child Welfare Specialization must have the following additional prerequisites: SOWK 412, SOWK 483 and SOWK 491.
This is a four day per week supervised practicum in a multi-disciplinary setting, for a total of 15 weeks and the completion of 420 practicum hours. Students are also required to participate in an online seminar class that will focus on the integration of theory and practice.
Note: A criminal records review is required before placement. The existence of certain kinds of criminal records will preclude placement.
SOWK 450 3 credits
Social Work in Health Care
(formerly SSSW 450)
Prerequisite(s): SOWK 330
Corequisite(s): SOWK 410
This course will focus on social work issues in Canadian health care settings. Topics to be explored include: HIV/AIDS, provincial and federal health care systems; professional ethics; palliative care, death and dying; discharge planning; mental health issues; cross cultural issues in health care; and working with marginalized populations in meeting their health care needs. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the health care system, health policy, and health services.
SOWK 483 3 credits
Family Centred Social Work
(formerly SSSW 483)
Prerequisite(s): HSER 283 or a family sociology course, and SOWK 300, or instructor’s permission
This course will provide an overview of clinical social work practice theory, including its historical roots and some recent developments. It will help students gain an understanding of how their own personality, value system and past family experiences affect her/his work with families. It will incorporate basic conceptual and clinical skills relating to the theory and practice of family work while critically reviewing issues from a structural/feminist and anti-oppressive framework.
SOWK 490 3 credits
Gerontological Social Work
(formerly SSSW 490)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program (Students in other degree programs, with a minimum of 45 credits, may be able to obtain instructor’s permission at the first class. However, they should check with their program head to see whether they can apply this course to their degree.)
This course is an introduction to gerontology (the study of aging) and to working with an aging population. We will explore a wide range of issues relevant to population aging from a variety of theoretical and practical perspectives. In addition to looking at the role of the elderly in our society, the course will provide a framework for examining the organization and delivery of services to the elderly in both institutional and non institutional settings.
SOWK 491 3 credits
Child Welfare
(formerly SSSW 491)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program and SOWK 311
This course will look at the major historical, ideological, legal, and professional themes that inform child welfare policy. Issues including current legislation, history of child welfare, foster care, adoption, the social construction of mothering and child abuse will be examined. Contemporary policies and programs for populations disproportionately engaged with child welfare services including First Nations children, immigrant and refugee children and children of single parents will be examined. Students will be expected to engage in a process of integrating factors of gender, class, race, culture and sexual orientation into their critical analysis of the ideological nature of Child Welfare.
SOWK 493 3 credits
Feminist Social Work
(formerly SSSW 493)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program and instructor’s permission. (Students with a minimum of 45 credits in other degree programs may be able to obtain instructor’s permission at the first class. However, they should check with their program head to see whether they can apply this course to their degree.)
This course will examine social issues from a feminist perspective, incorporating an analysis of the ideology and conceptual practices and underpinning social welfare policy in Canada. Beginning with the historical development of feminist social work and feminist theories as they relate to social work practice, the class will explore gender role stereotypes, social welfare policies, ethics research as empowerment, and specific issues experienced by women in areas such as disability, sexual orientation, and violence.
SOWK 495 3 credits
Directed Study in Social Work
(formerly SSSW 495)
Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing in BSW program and department’s permission
Students who have a special interest in a topic area not offered through identified social work electives or core curriculum, may request to do directed social work study under the supervision of a faculty instructor.
SOWK 496 3 credits
Disability Issues
(formerly SSSW 496)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program. (Students with a minimum of 45 credits in other degree programs may be able to obtain instructor’s permission at the first class. However, they should check with the program head to see whether they can apply this course to their program.)
This course involves students in an examination of perspectives on disability, as well as a critical analysis of current theories, policies, and practice. The course begins with an examination of common assumptions about disability and provides opportunities to challenge and critique interpretations of the nature and meaning of disability. Several frameworks are proposed for approaching disability issues, with emphasis given to a social justice framework which emphasizes the citizenship and human rights of people with disabilities. The history of attitudes about, and treatment of, people with disabilities is examined. Significant events and the contributions of pioneers of the disability rights movement are also highlighted. The roles and perspectives of people with disabilities, family members, and professionals in service systems are examined in the context of a range of topics.
SOWK 497 3 credits
Social Work and Mental Health
(formerly SSSW 497)
Prerequisite(s): Admission into the BSW program. (Students in other degree programs, with a minimum of 45 credits, may be able to obtain instructor’s permission at the first class. However, they should check with their Program head to see whether they can apply this course to their degree)
This course is an introduction to the field of mental health and the role of social work within the field. Issues to be explored include: the social construction of mental illness, stigmatization of the individual and a critique of the medical model. Influence of factors such as gender, age, race and culture on the definition and treatment of persons with a mental illness will also be explored. The roles and contributions of various mental health professional practitioners will be discussed. Current policy and practice issues in mental health in Canada and their implications for practice will be examined.
Social, Cultural, & Media Studies
The following interdisciplinary courses are offered by the Social, Cultural, and Media Studies department. Each course draws on research and theory from two or more of the following disciplines: anthropology, Latin American studies, media and communication studies, and sociology.
To assist student in planning their programs, the disciplinary focus is noted as follows:
 
ANTH      Anthropology
LAS          Latin American studies
MACS      Media and Communication Studies
SOC         Sociology
For example, a course with a disciplinary focus of SOC, ANTH may be counted as either sociology or anthropology credit, but not both.
Additional courses in anthropology, Latin American studies, media and communication studies, and sociology are located under those discipline names in this calendar.
SCMS 255 3 credits
Introduction to Social Research
(formerly Anth 255, Soc 255)
Prerequisite(s): Anth 102 or Soc 101
Disciplinary focus: Anth, Soc
An introduction to the conduct of sociological and anthropological research. Topics include the relationship between theory and research, concept formation, operationalization, exploratory studies, hypothesis generation and testing, data collection techniques within both sociology and anthropology, the assessment of causality, the critical evaluation of research on both theoretical and methodological grounds, the definition of research problems, and ethical issues in social research.
SCMS 270 3 credits
Dynamics of Racism in Canada
Prerequisite(s): One of Soc. 101, Anth 102, MACS 130, or LAS 200.
Disciplinary focus: Anth, MACS, Soc
This course is a critical introduction to the area of race and ethnic relations within the Canadian context. In particular racism, inequality, and the social construction of racial and ethnic categories and identities will be examined. The student will develop an awareness of competing conceptual definitions and theoretical interpretations of racism, examine controversies about the extent and meaning of racism in Canada, and investigate how the process of racialization occurs within institutions such as education, the media, and the criminal justice system. Course material will draw upon a variety of historical and contemporary sources, cases and examples, particularly those relevant to the Fraser Valley.
Note: Associate of Arts (MACS) students should speak with the Arts Advice Centre before taking this course for MACS credit.
SCMS 310 4 credits
Special Topics: Regional Studies of Latin America
(formerly Anth 310, Soc 310, LAS 310)
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include at least six credits of anthropology, sociology, and/or LAS. (One or more of Soc 250, Anth 220, or LAS 102, 110, 200, or 201 recommended
Disciplinary focus: Anth, Soc, LAS
Using sociological and anthropological approaches, this course is designed to provide you with insights into the society and culture of a specific nation or region within Latin America. In doing so we shall move effortlessly and with intellectual grace from the heady heights of macro-analysis and theoretical sociology to the details of micro-analysis and ethnography, and back again. The course will increase our awareness of the diversity of the Latin American experience — an experience that is becoming increasingly important and which also offers many insights into our own society.
Note: The region of study is denoted with a letter designation (e.g., SCMS 310a). Students may take SCMS 310 twice for credit as long as the letter designation differs, but may not take it more than twice.
Students who have previously taken ANTH 310, LAS 310, or Soc 310 should contact the department before registering for any section of SCMS 310, to ensure they are not repeating a course for which they already have credit.
SCMS 334 4 credits
Cultural Policy
(formerly MACS 334, Soc 334)
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include at least six credits of sociology and/or MACS
Disciplinary focus: MACS, Soc
This course examines public policy in Canada as it pertains to culture. It explores government involvement in areas such as the arts, radio and television broadcasting, multiculturalism, and pornography.
SCMS 355 4 credits
Quantitative Methods
(formerly Soc 355)
Prerequisite(s): Math 104 or Math 106, and SCMS 255
Disciplinary focus: Anth, Soc
An examination of measurement issues within sociological and anthropological research, focusing on the logical and conceptual construction and interpretation of tables, and an examination of the issues and abuses of statistics. Students will blend classroom knowledge of statistics with “real life” analysis of sociological data (including the use of computer software) to develop practical research skills. The course focuses on the application, rather than the mathematics, of statistics.
SCMS 356 4 credits
Qualitative Research Methods
(formerly Soc 356)
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include Soc 101 and SCMS 255
Disciplinary focus: Anth, Soc
This course examines methods used in the collection and analysis of sociological data including interviews, participant observations, ethnographic research, archival research, feminist methodologies, and research ethics.
SCMS 363 4 credits
Processes of Development and Underdevelopment: Latin America
(formerly Anth 363, Soc 363, LAS 318)
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include Soc 101 and at least three additional credits sociology, anthropology, or LAS. (Soc 250, Anth 220, and/or LAS 200 recommended)
Disciplinary focus: Anth, LAS, Soc
An examination of sociological and anthropological theories of development and underdevelopment as applied to the Third World. Topics include the nature and consequences of world system linkages, colonialism and decolonization, patterns of social and cultural change in selected societies and regions. Particular attention will be placed on the political economy for Latin America.
SCMS 387 4 credits
Canadian Native Peoples
(formerly Anth 387, Soc 387)
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include Anth 102 and at least three additional credits of Anthropology and/or Sociology
Disciplinary focus: Anth, Soc
This course looks at selected studies of cultural patterns and contemporary issues of Aboriginal peoples of Canada (including First Nations, Inuit, and Metis).
SCMS 388 4 credits
Minority Indigenous Peoples of the World
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include Anth 102 and at least three additional credits of anthropology and/or sociology
Disciplinary focus: Anth, LAS, Soc
This course will examine the social and cultural experiences of indigenous peoples within
various modern industrial nation-states and relations of these peoples with majority societies and other indigenous groups throughout the world.
SCMS 440 4 credits
Selected Topics in the Sociology of Religion
(formerly Soc 440)
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least nine credits of sociology and/or religious studies
Disciplinary focus: Soc
An advanced course in the sociology of religion. Topics will change from semester to semester. The course is usually offered conjointly with the courses in other specialty areas (e.g., LAS, Women’s Studies, etc.).
SCMS 440A 4 credits
Religion in Latin America
(formerly Soc 440A, LAS 440)
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least nine credits of sociology, LAS and/or religious studies. (HIST 261, 262, 459 can be considered LAS courses) (Anth 130 can be considered religious studies)
Disciplinary focus: LAS, Soc
Most people know of Latin America as the crucible for recent developments in Catholicism like liberation theology. However, religion has long played a central role in shaping Latin American societies just as it has been shaped by them. This course will explore the connections between religion and society in the Latin American context. The emphasis of the course will shift from semester to semester, but it will normally focus on some combination of the following: pre-Columbian religions, Catholicism and conquest, syncretism, liberation theology, religion and revolution, evangelism, the survival of indigenous religions, and other related topics.
SCMS 460 4 credits
Issues in the Information Society
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include at least nine credits of Soc and/or MACS, or permission of instructor
Disciplinary focus: Macs, Soc
This course explores the social, political, and cultural dimensions of information technology and what has come to be known as the “information society”. Students will examine technology in relationship to a variety of social issues such as the changing nature of: work, individual identity formation, social roles, democracy, privacy, and community.
SCMS 463 4 credits
Special Topics in Development Studies
(formerly Anth 463, Soc 463)
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least nine credits of sociology and/or anthropology. (Anth 220, SCMS 363 and Soc 250 recommended)
Disciplinary focus: Anth, LAS, Soc
An examination of processes of social and cultural change in selected Third World societies. Topics will change from semester to semester, but may include liberation movements and colonialism, the comparative study of post-revolutionary societies; the persistence, transformation, and disappearance of contemporary peasantries; and directed change programs.
Note: this course uses a letter designation to denote the specific topic (e.g., SCMS 463a). Students may take SCMS 463 twice for credit as long as the letter designation differs, but may not take it more than twice.
Students who have previously taken Anth 463 or Soc 463 should contact the department before registering for any section of SCMS 463, to ensure they are not repeating a course for which they already have credit.
SCMS 468 4 credits
Environment and Society
(formerly Anth 468, Soc 468)
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include Anth 102 and at least six additional credits of sociology and/or anthropology
Disciplinary focus: Anth, Soc
This course examines anthropological and sociological approaches to ecological and environmental issues. Topics include relationships between forms of social organization and resource use, studies of resource use conflicts, and the ways in which different cultures view the environment.
SCMS 470 4 credits
Race and Racism: Selected Topics
(formerly Anth 470, Soc 470)
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least nine credits of sociology and/or anthropology
Disciplinary focus: Anth, Soc
Questions of race and ethnicity arise frequently in the context of popular discussions of social problems, national identity, and even national unity. They are equally important in academic discussions about modern societies around the world. This course explores selected topics related to race, racism, and ethnicity from sociological and anthropological perspectives. Topics covered may include ethnic conflict, immigration and immigration policy, multiculturalism, racism, the development of immigrant identities and communities, charter groups/dominant cultures, indigenous and migrant subordination, the meaning of exile, etc. Students should consult the department to determine the content for a particular semester.
SCMS 470A 4 credits
Latin American Immigrants and Immigration
(formerly Anth 470A, LAS 470, Soc 470)
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least nine credits of sociology, anthropology and/or LAS (LAS 110 and/or Hist 261 recommended)
Disciplinary focus: Anth, LAS, Soc
Immigration has been a crucial element in the formation of Latin American society and culture. It as shaped the identity and community among Latin Americans abroad and has had reciprocal effects on the immigrants’ societies of origin. This course explores various aspects of Latino immigration from several perspectives. Topics covered may include: the push/pull factors causing immigration, immigration policy, the development of immigrant identities, the meaning of exile, and the formation of immigrant communities and their relationship to the dominant culture of Canadian society. The course will be of interest to students in Latin American studies and other who will work with Latino communities in Canada.
SCMS 492 2 credits
Directed Studies in Social, Cultural, and Media Studies
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include six credits of area of specialization (Anth, Soc, LAS, MACS). Permission to enter requires written consent of both the faculty member supervising the student and the department head
Corequisite(s): None
Disciplinary focus: Dependent on topic selected.
Designed for upper-level students who wish to examine in greater depth a particular problem/issue in anthropology, sociology, Latin American studies, or media and communication studies.
Sociology
Additional credits in sociology
The following SCMS courses can be used as sociology credit. Course descriptions are found under Social, Cultural, and Media Studies beginning on page 333.
SCMS 255 — Introduction to Social Research
SCMS 270 — The Dynamics of Racism in Canada
SCMS 310 — Special Topics: Regional Studies in Latin America
SCMS 334 — Cultural Policy
SCMS 355 — Quantitative Research Methods
SCMS 356 — Qualitative Research Methods
SCMS 363 — Processes of Development and Under-Development in Latin America
SCMS 387 — Canadian Native People
SCMS 388 — Comparative Studies of Minority Indigenous Peoples
SCMS 440 — Selected Topics in the Sociology of Religion
SCMS 440A — Religion in Latin America
SCMS 460 — Issues in the Information Society
SCMS 463 — Special Topics in Development Studies
SCMS 468 — Environment and Society
SCMS 470 — Race and Racism: Selected Topics
SCMS 470A — Latin American Immigrants and Immigration
SOC 101 3 credits
Introductory Sociology
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is an analysis of the basic concepts, methods, and theoretical orientations which are characteristic of sociology. It is designed to acquaint you with the discipline and to facilitate critical and logical thought concerning explanations of society and social interaction.
SOC 201 3 credits
Key Ideas in Sociology
Prerequisite(s): Soc 101 or MACS 110
This course provides a survey of sociological perspectives in the 19th and 20th centuries. It provides a history of sociology as it focuses on the thinkers and ideas that have shaped it. Students will study selected works which represent the breadth and depth of sociology.
SOC 210 3 credits
Social Problems of Canadian Society
Prerequisite(s): Soc 101
This course examines selected social issues, both in terms of their historical development and their relationship to the structure of Canadian society. Particular attention is paid to the core structural and institutional issues that are consequent to the political economy of Canada — issues such as inequality, racism, poverty, technological development and the transformation of communities. Additional issues may be studied such as aboriginal land claims, U.S./Canada relationships issues of Canadian foreign policy, immigration, and the environment. Attention will also be given to strategies for coping with social change, including feminism, the green movement, the anti-free trade movement and others.
SOC 215 3 credits
Socialization
Prerequisite(s): Soc 101 recommended
Socialization is the process by which people learn the norms and values of the society in which they live. This course examines the process of socialization in one or more of the following institutions: family, education, media, and/or religion. Particular emphasis will be placed on issues of gender, ethnicity, and class in North America.
SOC 220 3 credits
Sociology of Women in Canada
Prerequisite(s): Soc 101 recommended
This course will use feminist sociological perspectives used in understanding the changing roles of women in Canada. After introducing the process whereby women and men learn gender roles, the course will emphasize the changes occurring for Canadian women in the family, the labour force, and the community. Students will have the opportunity to examine changes in their own social world.
SOC 230 3 credits
The Individual and Society
Prerequisite(s): Soc 101
This course is an introduction to sociological social psychology. It has been designed to give an overview of the important concepts, issues, and debates within the field. The main paradigm of the course will be interpretive and include such theories as symbolic interactionism and phenomenology. Students will be introduced to the historical development of North American sociological thought and the social construction of self-identity within North American society.
SOC 250 3 credits
Sociology of Development — The Third World Experience
Prerequisite(s): None, Soc 101 recommended
This course is an introduction to the sociology of international development. In it we look at the nature and development of the third world (the largest part of the global social system) and the major explanations of underdevelopment. Among the case studies used to evaluate critically the alternative paths of development there is an emphasis on examples from Latin America. It will be of special interest to those planning to teach, to anyone hoping to work in or travel to the Third World, to those interested in Canada s position in the world, and to anyone concerned about globalization.
SOC 331 4 credits
Sociology of Families
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include at least six credits sociology
A description and analysis of family structures in modern industrial society. Major theoretical perspectives on families and family change in developed societies will be examined, as well as varying methodological approaches to the study of families. Topics may include mate selection, marriage and divorce, family size and structures, domestic labour, power relationships within family, childhood socialization, variant family forms, and policy issues related to families. (Seminar)
SOC 333 4 credits
Schooling and Society
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include at least six credits of sociology
A sociological analysis of the education system and its relation to major social institutions in Western industrial societies, in particular Canada. Aspects studied may include the classroom, teachers, student culture, bureaucratization, inequality, employment, and social policy. (Seminar)
Note: Students cannot take Educ 333 for further credit.
SOC 335 4 credits
Gender Relations and Social Issues
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include at least six credits sociology. (Soc 215 and/or 220 recommended)
A sociological study of the position of women and men in one or more of the major social institutions in western industrial societies, in particular Canada. Social institutions that may be examined include the family, education, the economy, the polity, the law, and the mass media. Various social policy issues and controversial topics related to gender may also be examined.
SOC 340 4 credits
Sociology of Religion
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, including Anth 130 and three Sociology credits
This course examines of the classical theories and modern research used to explain religion and its role in society and social change. Topics may include: the complexity of religious systems, formation and maintenance of religious organizations, religion and social inequality, religion and prejudice, social change and religious adaptation, secularization, the marketing of religion, alternative forms of religion, and religion and globalization.
SOC 350 4 credits
Classical Sociological Thought
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits, to include at least six credits sociology; SOC 201 recommended
An explanation of selected work of 19th or early 20th century sociological theorists, primarily Marx, Durkheim, and Weber.
SOC 450 4 credits
Selected Issues in Sociological Theory
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least nine credits sociology. (Soc 350 recommended)
An examination of the ideas of a particular thinker or group of thinkers, or of the different approaches to a particular theoretical problem. Examples include, but are not limited to, feminist theory, post-structuralism, and neo-Marxism.
SOC 490 4 credits
Directed Readings in Sociology
Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, to include at least nine credits of sociology plus permission from supervising faculty member and department head
Directed reading in a selected field of study under the direction of a single faculty member. A major paper will be required.
Spanish
SPAN 101 3 credits
Spanish Language I
Prerequisite(s): None
Spanish 101, designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Spanish, is an introduction to understanding, speaking, reading and writing. The aim of this course is to provide students with grounding in basic Spanish language skills, either for comfort in non-intensive language use situations (e.g., holidays) or as a basis for future studies toward proficiency in intensive language use situations (e.g., work). Students should also gain a cultural awareness of contemporary Hispanic societies.
SPAN 102 3 credits
Spanish Language II
Prerequisite(s): Spanish 101 or instructor’s permission
Spanish 102 will complete the student’s familiarity with all aspects of basic Spanish. For some, this will be sufficient formal study for comfort in non-intensive language use situations like holidays, while others will wish to continue in order to improve their ability to communicate. The aim of this course is to build on skills learned in Spanish 101 to improve the student’s competency in oral and written Spanish with special attention to communication skills for common situations. Students should also further a cultural awareness of contemporary Hispanic countries.
SPAN 201 3 credits
Intermediate Spanish
Prerequisite(s): Spanish 12 or Spanish 102
Spanish 201 and Spanish 202 together comprise the intermediate level of Spanish language studies at UCFV. They are structured in such a way that students may take either one first. However, students must take both in order to complete their intermediate tasks.
The aim of this course is to further develop the students’ ability to express themselves in spoken and written language at the intermediate level while introducing them to contemporary literary work by important figures in Spanish and Latin American literature in order to provide them with social and historical insight.
SPAN 202 3 credits
Intermediate Spanish
Prerequisite(s): Spanish 12 or Spanish 102
Spanish 201 and Spanish 202 together comprise the intermediate level of Spanish language studies at UCFV. They are structured in such a way that students may take either one first. However, students must take both in order to complete their intermediate tasks.
This course is designed to consolidate the language skills acquired in introductory-level courses and to build communicative skills and cultural competency. The study of context-specific vocabularies helps to prepare students for communication in specific real-life situations as well as developing the interpretive skills needed to cope with unfamiliar situations.
Speech and Language
SLA 201 3 credits
Introduction to the Profession of Speech Language Pathology and the Role of the Speech Language Assistant
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Speech and Language Assistant diploma program or permission of the program head
This course is designed to introduce the student to the profession of speech and language, the affiliated organizations, and related publications. The students will be introduced to the guidelines for supportive personnel. This course will also examine the respective role and responsibilities of the speech and language assistant, as applied to various models of service delivery. Students will be encouraged to attend professional conferences, and guest speakers representing these organizations will be invited to present at class.
SLA 202 3 credits
Language/Learning/Literacy
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Speech and Language Assistant diploma program or permission of the program head
This course will explore the relationship between language, literacy, and academic success. Typical language and literacy development will be studied. Language and cultural issues will be the focus of the interpersonal skills subject area. The nature of language within the context of school (language of instruction) will be compared to that of home. Language intervention strategies (oral and written) will be discussed, emphasizing individual differences in processing styles (top-down and bottom-up) along with the role of metacognition and metalinguistics. Appropriate utilization of speech and language assistants as supportive personnel, carrying out program recommendations in accordance with the assessment profile, will be stressed.
SLA 203 3 credits
Communication Disorders and Intervention Techniques
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Speech and Language Assistant diploma program or permission of the program head
This course will explore the nature of language and communication disorders in children and the impact of such disorders on the child, the family, and the school. Language intervention approaches will be explored addressing the appropriate role of the speech and language assistant in carrying out program recommendations with both preschool and school- aged population. Students will be introduced to augmentative forms of communication and ways of making these systems functional for the child’s environment, as well as adapting programming to reduce barriers for diverse populations.
SLA 204 3 credits
Articulation/Phonology
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Speech and Language Assistant diploma program or permission of the program head
This course is designed to provide you with introductory skills and theoretical background pertaining to treatment and methodology in the areas of articulation and phonology. Normal developmental milestones/sequences determining the need for intervention and the intervention process itself will be discussed. A sampling of activities and strategies reflective of various treatment approaches will be discussed. The role of the speech and language assistant in implementing program recommendations will be emphasized throughout.
SLA 205 3 credits
Programming
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Speech and Language Assistant diploma program or permission of the program head
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of the principles of conditioning so that they may be incorporated into programming strategies. You will develop accurate observation skills and a variety of recording skills enabling you to be more aware of and precise about behaviour change. The course will also emphasize a practical approach to implementing program recommendations. Exposure to various activity-based programming techniques will be presented with a focus on functional life skill activities.
SLA 206 3 credits
Amplification Systems Aural Rehabilitation
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Speech and Language Assistant diploma program or permission of the program head
The fundamentals of sound, the human auditory mechanism, and associated pathologies will be examined. Various amplification systems will be discussed, examined, and used. You will learn maintenance procedures and problem-solving techniques for these systems. Philosophies and methodologies of aural rehabilitation will also be discussed.
SLA 207 3 credits
Language Learning Environments
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Speech and Language Assistant diploma program or permission of the program head
This course emphasizes the practical application of speech and language theory in order to ensure developmentally appropriate hands-on work with children who have delays, disabilities, and challenges in their language and speech patterns.
SLA 215 6 credits
Practicum
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Speech and Language Assistant diploma program and completion of SLA 201, SLA 202, SLA 203, SLA 204, SLA 205, and SLA 206
The practicum is designed to provide students with experience working in an assisting capacity with a qualified speech-language pathologist (BCASLPA Supportive Personnel Guidelines, May 17, 1994). A series of behavioural competencies will be provided as a guideline to facilitate understanding of your learning objectives. In cooperation with the agency, UCFV will provide support in practicum monitoring and evaluation guidelines.
Teaching English as a Second Language
TESL 300 4 credits
Foundations of Teaching English as a Second Language
Prerequisite(s): Ling 101
This introductory foundations course provides prospective ESL/EFL teachers with an overview of theory and research in the field of TESL. By examining a broad range of theory and research, the course is intended to give students an historical perspective of the theoretical foundations of TESL, and to help course participants develop a set of principles to guide their practice as English language teachers.
TESL 310 4 credits
Methodology in Teaching English as a Second Language
Prerequisite(s): Ling 101
This introduction to ESL teaching methodology provides the basic concepts and skills a beginning teacher will need to develop and implement coherent and sequenced lesson plans, select and create teaching materials, provide clear and helpful instruction in the four main skill areas (speaking, listening, reading, and writing), including pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar; monitor and assess student progress, manage the classroom learning environment, and adapt to a variety of teaching situations.
TESL 333 2 credits
Teaching English as a Second Language Practicum
Prerequisite(s): Ling 101
Pre- or corequisite(s): TESL 300, TESL 310
Students will spend a minimum of 10 hours of observation time and 10 hours of instructional time, followed by 10 hours of debriefing by a TESL professional who serves as the supervisor.
Theatre
THEA 101 3 credits
Introduction to Theatre
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the theory and practice of theatre, exploring such topics as the nature and function of theatre in modern society, performance space, the process of theatrical production, the arts of the playwright and the actor, critical and creative analysis of play scripts from a theatrical perspective, critical evaluation and appreciation of theatre productions, the development and value of theatre in one or two specific historical periods (i.e., Classical Athens, Medieval Japan, Italian Renaissance, Elizabethan England).Please note that Thea 101 is not an acting class. Students wishing to study acting must audition for Thea 111.
THEA 111 3 credits
Acting I
Prerequisite(s): None
Integrates the development of acting resources with learning the first stages of a systematic approach to the acting craft.
THEA 112 3 credits
Acting II
Prerequisite(s): Thea 111, or instructor’s permission
Continuation of the development of acting skills begun in Acting I. You will participate in scenes from major dramatic works.
THEA 121 3 credits
Introduction to Technical Theatre
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the techniques of stage management, lighting, and set construction. There will be practical production assignments in these areas.
THEA 123 3 credits
Intro to Tech Theatre II
Prerequisite(s): Thea 121
A continuation of Thea 121, introducing the techniques of costuming, make-up, scene painting, drafting, and sound in the theatre. You will participate in practical application of these techniques.
THEA 199 3 credits
Practicum I
Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission, or audition
Intense practical experience in theatre performance and production.
THEA 201 3 credits
History of Theatre — Major Trends and Issues of the 20th Century
Prerequisite(s): Thea 101
This course surveys the innovations and insights which shaped theatre as an art form during the 20th century. Major trends and issues in the theatre will be explored in their own right, as well as in the context of larger cultural and historical forces.
THEA 202 3 credits
History of Theatre — Major Trends and Issues to the 19th Century
Prerequisite(s): Thea 101
This course surveys key topics in the history of theatre up to the 19th century. Specific themes drawn from the key areas of acting, audiences, theatre architecture, performance space, scenography, directing, and theatre criticism will be examined through a range of historical periods.
THEA 211 3 credits
Acting III
Prerequisite(s): Thea 112, instructor’s permission, or audition
This is an intermediate acting course focusing on textual analysis and the performance of short scenes.
THEA 212 3 credits
Acting IV
Prerequisite(s): THEA 211, or instructor’s permission, or audition
Emphasis in this course is placed on interpretation and characterization. Students will prepare and present several scenes and one full-length play.
THEA 297 3 credits
Independent Study
Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission
An individual course of study in a selected theatre discipline. This course is available to second-year theatre students who must consult with the department head to arrange to take this course.
THEA 298 3 credits
Independent Study
Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission, or audition
An individual course of study in a theatre discipline. This course is available to second-year theatre students who must consult with the department head to arrange to take this course.
THEA 299 3 credits
Practicum II
Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission, or audition
Advanced practical experience in theatre performance and production.
THEA 311 4 credits
Acting for the Camera
Prerequisite(s): Thea 211
An exploration of the theory and practice of acting for the camera. This course examines the close relationship between stage and film acting and introduces students to the unique demands of creating effective on-camera performances. Studio exercises and projects involve students in a progression of on-camera explorations leading to the creation of a basic film acting technique. The course also introduces students to the vocabulary and practices of the film and TV industries.
THEA 352 4 credits
Playmaking
Prerequisite(s): Thea 101, 211
An exploration of the processes of playmaking. The course will examine topics such as mask, street and political theatre, ritual art, collective creation, self-scripting, and other playmaking activities. Emphasis will be placed upon the creation of original material with the possibility of public performance.
THEA 359 4 credits
Selected Topics in Theatre
Prerequisite(s): Thea 101, 211
A specific topic in theatre which provides a stronger focus on a specific area of theatre studies than is available elsewhere. The course will include a combination of practical (studio) and theoretical work. Initially, the course topic will be “Shakespeare’s texts and the actor”.
THEA 370 4 credits
Intro to Stage Design
Prerequisite(s): Thea 121 or 123
An introduction to the fundamentals of theatre design including a brief history of stage development from ancient Greece to the contemporary period. Theoretical and practical use of theatre design principles in set, costume, and lighting will be explored and applied.
THEA 395 4 credits
Costume Practicum I
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
This course will provide students the opportunity to integrate theory and practice in the area of costume studies. By undertaking intermediate responsibilities in costume construction and management, students will develop skills and knowledge.
THEA 399 4 credits
Practicum III
Prerequisite(s): Thea 199 or 299. Admission only by department permission
This course will provide upper-level students with the opportunity to integrate theory and practice. By undertaking intermediate responsibilities in performance or production, students will develop theatre skills and knowledge.
THEA 453 4 credits
Theory and Practice of Directing
Prerequisite(s): Thea 211 plus one of Thea 199 or 299
An introduction of the fundamentals of directing commencing with a survey of directing history and theory. The course will focus on the director’s creative process. Each student will work on practical direction assignments culminating in the presentation of a one-act play.
THEA 490 4 credits
Directed Studies in Theatre
Prerequisite(s): Twelve theatre credits plus the written permission of both the instructor and the Department head. Students enrolled in the English Major Drama Concentration may also seek department permission to take this course
This course offers students the opportunity to pursue in-depth independent study of a particular issue, problem or topic in theatre. Students must, in consultation with a faculty member, develop detailed individual course proposals indicating the readings and how the course will be assessed.
THEA 495 4 credits
Costume Practicum II
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
This course will provide students the opportunity to further integrate theory and practice in the area of costume studies. By undertaking senior responsibilities in costume construction and management, students will develop skills and knowledge.
THEA 499 4 credits
Practicum IV
Prerequisite(s): Thea 399. Admission is only by department permission
This course will provide upper-level students with the opportunity to integrate theory and practice. By undertaking senior responsibilities in performance or production, students will develop theatre skills and knowledge.
Training in Attitudes, Skills, and Knowledge for the Workplace (TASK)
TASK 01 0 credits
Self Assessment
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This module provides students the opportunity to define their strengths and abilities in preparation for selecting realistic career options.
TASK 02 0 credits
Career Exploration
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Students will compare vocational careers, and choose appropriate entry-level work opportunities.
TASK 03 0 credits
Management Skills
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This module covers all aspects of effective communication including appropriate assertive behaviour.
TASK 04 0 credits
Daily Survival Skills
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This module covers all facets of daily living related to: budgeting, banking, identifying pay cheques and pay stubs, and analyzing personal rights and duties.
TASK 05 0 credits
Computer Basics I
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This module, offered throughout the program, introduces students to computers, including the world wide web and e-mail.
TASK 06 0 credits
Employment Readiness
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This module focuses on identifying and locating job openings, as well as covering all other aspects of job search and job maintenance skills.
TASK 07 0 credits
Interview Skills
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This module covers all aspects of preparing appropriately for effective interviews.
TASK 08 0 credits
Work Experience
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This four-week work experience provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate appropriate work attitudes on the job, and also to demonstrate the work skills and knowledge acquired in the classroom.
TASK 09 0 credits
Retaining Employment
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This module covers job retaining skills and their importance in the working world.
TASK 10 0 credits
Computer Basics II
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
Corequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This module focuses on reinforcement and practice of basic computer skills developed in Computer Basics I.
TASK 11 0 credits
First Aid Workshop
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This four-hour course covers the ABC’s of basic first aid, blocked airways, one person CPR, management of the conscious and choking victim, and lift and transport of the victim.
TASK 12 0 credits
WHMIS Workshop
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This course covers “controlled product/hazardous materials labelling which alerts workers to the identity and dangers of products and to basic safety precautions”.
TASK 13 0 credits
Infectious Disease Workshop
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This course covers information on infectious diseases that may be acquired in the workplace, and how to protect yourself and others from acquiring the diseases.
TASK 14 0 credits
Food Safe Level I — Industry Standard Program
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
A food handling course for managers, kitchen staff, and dining attendants. Successful students will be registered with the Ministry of Health, and will receive a Food Safe certificate recognized by the B.C. Hotels and Restaurant Association throughout the province.
TASK 15 0 credits
Super Host — Tourism Industry Course
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the TASK program
This course offers all aspects of customer service required in the service industry and world of work in general. Super Host certificates are supplied by the local Chamber of Commerce offices.
Tutor Training
TUTR 110 3 credits
Introduction to Literacy Tutoring
Prerequisite(s): Admission to Literacy Tutor certificate program
In this introduction to tutoring adults, participants will develop an understanding of literacy, voluntarism and the needs of adult learners. Basic techniques in teaching reading, writing, and numeracy will be covered for native speakers, English as a second language students, and students with disabilities. Participants will complete a practicum in a literacy program (minimum 15 hrs.) as part of Tutor 110.
TUTR 120 2 credits
Interpersonal Skills for Tutors
Prerequisite(s): Tutor 110 or equivalent
This course will provide participants with the skills needed to establish and maintain an effective rapport with literacy-level learners. Using experiential learning techniques, the course will cover topics such as self-concept awareness, active listening, effective responding styles, non-verbal communication, assertiveness, problem solving, and cross-cultural communication.
TUTR 130 2 credits
Group Dynamics for Tutors
Prerequisite(s): Tutor 110 or equivalent
In many programs, literacy tutoring takes place within the context of small learner groups. This course will introduce participants to relevant, practical aspects of small group theory. Through an exploration of stages of group formation, member roles, and leadership styles, participants will learn how to effectively facilitate small groups to encourage co-operative learning and peer support. Elements of instructional design for small groups such as theme units and whole language activities, will also be examined.
TUTR 140 3 credits
Advanced Theory and Techniques for Literacy Tutors
Prerequisite(s): Tutor 110 or equivalent
Designed to further develop participants’ skills as literacy practitioners, advanced theory and techniques in three areas will be covered: basic literacy instruction, ESL literacy instruction, and literacy instruction for learners with disabilities. In each section, participants will explore issues arising from instruction in order to expand their skill-base and foster their professional growth.
TUTR 145 2 credits
Practicum
Prerequisite(s): Tutor 140 or equivalent
This supervised practicum provides skill development and integration of theoretical learning into practice. Participants will develop in-depth experience in one of three instructional areas: basic literacy, learning disabilities, or English as a second language.
Visual Arts
Many of the seats in these courses are reserved for students in the Visual Arts programs but students are invited to apply for non-reserved seats. See also Film and Art History course descriptions.
For current transferability information see the B.C. transfer guide online at www.bccat.bc.ca.
In courses of individual study in various media under the direction of faculty, students have the opportunity to pursue studies of particular interest according to their chosen area(s) of concentration.
Note: Students can apply a maximum of three credits of Independent Study as upper-level credits toward the Visual Arts minor and extended minor.
VA 113 3 credits
Introduction to Drawing
Prerequisite(s): None
This is an introductory drawing course that is designed to give the student technical art training and skill development balanced with experimental processes. Students will be exposed to both traditional and non-traditional methods, materials, ideas, and techniques. This course will emphasize the importance of drawing from three distinct positions: technical skill development , development of personal expression, and the important role art plays in describing and formulating our society today.
VA 123 3 credits
Painting/Drawing I
(formerly FA 123)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course offers an introduction to the basic fundamentals of pictorial development and practice. Students will be introduced to a variety of painting and drawing techniques, theories, and principles that constitute a work of art today. This course is designed to give students technical art training and skill development balanced with experimental processes associated with current art practices.
VA 124 3 credits
Painting/Drawing II
(formerly FA 124)
Prerequisite(s): VA 123
An advanced study of the principles and practices introduced in VA 123. Emphasis will be placed on skill development, personal expression, experimentation, and directed study.
VA 131 3 credits
Sculpture I
(formerly FA 131)
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the concerns and techniques of sculpture through experimentation and exploration with contemporary and traditional materials and methods. The course defines basic sculptural terminology and assists students to analyze and understand production in the context of both individual interests and contemporary theory and practice.
VA 132 3 credits
Sculpture II
(formerly FA 132)
Prerequisite(s): VA 131
A continuation of the investigation in VA 131 into the concerns and techniques of sculpture through experimentation and exploration with contemporary and traditional materials and methods. Students are encouraged to develop and to express their interests and strengths, as well as to establish an ability to work independently in the sculpture area.
VA 151 3 credits
Print Media I
(formerly FA 151)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces fundamental procedures of basic intaglio /relief methods, including etching, collograph, linocut, and various mono-printing techniques. Students will develop their own unique sensibilities in relation to how these processes affect creative image development. They will also gain understanding of the historical, social, and aesthetic ramifications of this medium and its relationship to contemporary art issues.
Note: Because of limited studio resources, students may repeat this Visual Arts course only with permission of both the instructor and department head.
VA 152 3 credits
Print Media II
(formerly FA 152)
Prerequisite(s): VA 151
This course will involve a continuation of the basics introduced in VA151 for creative and personal development. More advanced issues are explored, including advanced etching techniques, multiple plate, colour printing, mixing techniques, and concepts of production.
Note: Because of limited studio resources, students may repeat this Visual Arts course only with permission of both the instructor and department head.
VA 171 3 credits
Interdisciplinary Media I
(formerly FA 171)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course offers an introduction to the language, content, and methods of time-based media. Students are introduced to video and audio art, time-based installation, and performance art. These media are investigated through both studio production and academic research. Many disciplines covered in this course share common histories and interrelated studio practices. Interdisciplinary work is therefore encouraged. The overall objective is to provide students with hands-on production experience while familiarizing them with the various visual and textual discourses that surround time-based art production.
VA 172 3 credits
Interdisciplinary Media II
(formerly FA 172)
Prerequisite(s): VA 171
This course continues the multidisciplinary approach to art making developed in VA 171. In this course research and practice extend to areas within site-specific installation, public art, video and audio production as they relate to visual art practice. Course content is explored through student presentations, reading and writing assignments, individual and collaborative projects, visual presentations of time-based work, class critiques, and discussions. Students continue to develop technical and conceptual skills for production and critical engagement.
VA 183 3 credits
Photography I
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of black-and-white photography. Students will be instructed in the use of the 35mm camera and its controls, the properties of natural light, film processing, and darkroom techniques. Experimentation and the development of a creative personal approach to the medium will be encouraged.
Note: Students are required to provide their own 35 mm camera.
Note: Because of limited studio resources, students may repeat this Visual Arts course only with permission of both the instructor and department head.
VA 184 3 credits
Photography II
(formerly FA 184)
Prerequisite(s): VA 183
This course is a continuation of VA 183. Emphasis will be placed on the creative uses of black-and-white photography through a variety of techniques and presentations, including the introduction of archival printing and fibre-based paper. Students will be expected to develop their individual styles and interest through personal project development.
Note: Students are required to provide their own 35 mm camera.
Note: Because of limited studio resources, students may repeat this Visual Arts course only with permission of both the instructor and department head.
VA 205 3 credits
Art Practices and Popular Culture I
Prerequisite(s): AH 102 and one VA course
An examination of popular culture in relation to contemporary art-making practices, emphasizing the cross-fertilization of “fine” and “popular” art in recent decades. Students will be required to complete both studio and written projects for this course.
This course is also offered as AH 205. Credit cannot be obtained for both VA 205 and AH 205.
VA 210 3 credits
Art Practices and Popular Culture II
Prerequisite(s): AH 102 and one VA course
This course, which may be taken as a sequel to VA 205, continues to examine popular culture in relation to contemporary art-making practices, emphasizing the social and political role of the artist. Students will be required to complete both studio and written projects for this course.
This course is also offered as AH 210. Credit cannot be obtained for both VA 210 and AH 210.
VA 321 3 credits
Painting/Drawing III
(formerly FA 321)
Prerequisite(s): VA 124
This course offers an advanced study of painting and drawing techniques and theories as they pertain to contemporary cultural constructs. This course emphasizes the interrelationship of different art disciplines and practices to produce individual works of art that are culturally relevant and self expressive. Students work independently on projects designed by them in consultation with the instructor.
VA 322 3 credits
Painting/Drawing IV
(formerly FA 322)
Prerequisite(s): VA 321
This course explores the complex relationship art forms share with contemporary culture with a specific emphasis on: a) technical development; b) the knowledge of materials used to produce an art form, and; c) the philosophies and theories of art practice. This is a self directed course and students will be expected to work independently on projects designed by them in consultation with the instructor.
VA 331 3 credits
Sculpture III
(formerly FA 331)
Prerequisite(s): VA 132, or permission of instructor
This course permits focused progress from an understanding of sculptural concepts, media, and methods to more complex sculptural problems. The emphasis will be on developing concepts and applications that address individual interests, ranging from technical exploration and the situation of studio practice to theoretical concerns in contemporary sculptural production.
VA 332 3 credits
Sculpture IV
(formerly FA 332)
Prerequisite(s): VA 331, or permission of instructor
A continuation of VA 331 with an emphasis on independent development and the establishment of independent ideas. Studio projects are complemented by field trips and seminars.
VA 351 3 credits
Print Media III: Mixed Media
(formerly FA 351)
Prerequisite(s): VA 152
This course introduces advanced techniques in print -media practice through individual projects. Emphasis will be placed on the development of a coherent body of work, which reflects the student’s thought processes and critical thinking. This course is designed to encourage students to explore an interdisciplinary approach to image making such as mixing print mediums, or print with other studio disciplines, for creative and personal development. Depending on individual preferences, students can work in the medium of their choice. The instructor is available to guide students with the applications of photo silkscreen techniques, etching on copper, photo-intaglio, mono-print and mono-type techniques.
Note: Because of limited studio resources, students may repeat this Visual Arts course only with permission of both the instructor and department head.
VA 352 3 credits
Print Media IV: Advanced Mixed Media
(formerly FA 352)
Prerequisite(s): VA 351
This course is a further study of print-media art practice and theory. The primary focus will be on personal project development. Students will be encouraged to research their chosen area of interest to create a cohesive body of work in relation to their critical knowledge and understanding of the contemporary art issues discussed in class.
Note: Because of limited studio resources, students may repeat this Visual Arts course only with permission of both the instructor and department head.
VA 371 3 credits
Interdisciplinary Media III
(formerly FA 371)
Prerequisite(s): VA 172
This course is intended to advance students’ technical and conceptual knowledge of time- and technology-based art practices. Students complete two thematic projects before proposing and completing a final independent project. Students actively contribute to course content by presenting independent research and initiating discussion in their area of interest. This course also involves the mounting of an annual Interdisciplinary Media exhibition.
VA 372 3 credits
Interdisciplinary Media IV
(formerly FA 372)
Prerequisite(s): VA 371
This senior studio course is designed to allow for independent research and material development. Students are exposed to professional practices while they develop a material and conceptual language around their work. Course content is explored through theoretical research, independent projects, and a mock gallery submission.
VA 383 3 credits
Photography III
(formerly FA 383)
Prerequisite(s): VA 184
This course introduces advanced techniques in photographic practice including the use of digital photography. Emphasis will be placed on the development of a coherent body of work that reflects the student’s thought processes and critical thinking. Students will also examine the debates and developments of the role of photography within contemporary culture.
Note: Students are required to provide their own 35 mm camera.
Note: Because of limited studio resources, students may repeat this Visual Arts course only with permission of both the instructor and department head.
VA 384 3 credits
Photography IV
(formerly FA 384)
Prerequisite(s): VA 383
This course continues the study of photographic practice and theory. The primary focus will be on personal project development using various photographic media including digital photography. Students will be encouraged to research their chosen area of interest to create a cohesive body of work in relation to their critical knowledge and understanding of the contemporary art issues discussed in class.
Note: Students are required to provide their own 35 mm camera.
Note: Because of limited studio resources, students may repeat this Visual Arts course only with permission of both the instructor and department head.
VA 421 3 credits
Independent Study: Painting
(formerly VA 493)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the program head and instructors based on portfolio review
VA 422 3 credits
Independent Study: Painting
(formerly VA 493)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of program head and instructors based on portfolio review
VA 431 3 credits
Independent Study: Sculpture
(formerly VA 499)
Prerequisite(s): VA332 and permission of program head and instructors based on portfolio review
VA 432 3 credits
Independent Study: Sculpture
(formerly VA 499)
Prerequisite(s): VA332 and permission of program head and instructors based on portfolio review
VA 451 3 credits
Independent Study: Print Media
(formerly VA 495)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of program head and instructors based on portfolio review
VA 452 3 credits
Independent Study: Print Media
(formerly VA 495)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of program head and instructors based on portfolio review
VA 471 3 credits
Interdisciplinary Media V
(formerly VA 498)
Prerequisite(s): VA 372, and permission of instructor and department head based on portfolio review
The objective of this course is to offer students the opportunity to develop and exhibit independent work paralleled by a refined artist’s statement. Overall, students exercise greater independence and initiative as emerging artists. Students meet independently with the instructor, while scheduled group meetings facilitate class critiques and discussions.
VA 472 3 credits
Independent Study: Interdisciplinary Media
(formerly VA 498)
Prerequisite(s): VA372 and permission of program head and instructors based on portfolio review
VA 483 3 credits
Independent Study: Photography
(formerly VA 497)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of program head and instructors based on portfolio review
VA 484 3 credits
Independent Study: Photography
(formerly VA 497)
Prerequisite(s): Permission of program head and instructors based on portfolio review
 
Women’s Studies
Note: The following courses are not currently offered at UCFV. Interested students should check with the Social, Cultural, & Media Studies (SCMS) department head for alternative courses on women and gender.
WMST 101 3 credits
Introduction to Women’s Studies I
Prerequisite(s): None
This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to introduce students to the study of women in society and academia. It explores the development of feminist theories and methodologies, and the construction and meaning of gender. It examines women’s experiences within the context of class, race, age, and sexual orientation.
WMST 201 3 credits
Introduction to Women’s Studies II
Prerequisite(s): WMST 101
This course continues the multidisciplinary approach to the study of women developed in WMST 101. Specific topics may include women in science and medicine, law, politics, culture and philosophy. The analysis of Canadian women is placed within an historical and global context to allow for cross-cultural comparison as well as class, race, and age differences between groups of women.