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Criminology/Criminal Justice
Many of the seats in these courses are reserved for students in a Criminal Justice program. Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space. In all courses, students who do not satisfy the prerequisites may request instructor’s permission to register in the course.

English Language Requirements
Beginning Fall, 2007 students registering in post-secondary level courses (numbered 100 to 499) will be required to meet the English language entrance proficiency requirements. Students in ESL or the University Foundations programs can register in those courses identified in the University Foundations program with lower levels of language proficiency.

CRIM 1003 credits
Introduction to Criminology
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the historical evolution of criminological thought and criminology as a science and a profession. The structure, content, theoretical paradigms and practical applications of the discipline are investigated as well as some of its terminology (e.g., crime, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation, and treatment).

CRIM 1013 credits
Introduction to Corrections
Prerequisite(s): None
A historical review of correctional systems and the current theory and practice of Canadian corrections. Topics include sentencing, the incarceration process, probation, parole, institutional programs (e.g., work, education, security, social), rehabilitation, offender case management, community-based correctional programs, correctional workers, and community involvement in corrections.

CRIM 1033 credits
Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
Prerequisite(s): None
This introductory course provides an analysis of the historical and contemporary operational practices of the criminal justice system. Beginning with the moment that a crime is reported and following the offender through the various decision stages from initial police involvement to the paroled release of a convicted offender, this course examines the use of discretion, the day-to-day practices of criminal justice personnel, and the patterns of decision making and problems that underlie the operation of the criminal justice system.

CRIM 1043 credits
Sociological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the sociological, sociocultural, and sociopsychological explanations of criminal and deviant behaviour, which include ecological theories of crime and delinquency, conflict theories, structural theories, control theories, and symbolic-interactionist theories.

CRIM 1053 credits
Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the causes of criminal and deviant behaviour in terms of psychological theories and suppositions, including psychophysiological, psychoanalytic, behavioural, cognitive, and biological theories. The focus of the course is on the similarities and differences across theories and research findings, and on the relationship between theories discussed and criminal justice policy.

CRIM 1093 credits
The Administration of Justice in Canada
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the administration of justice. This includes perceptions of justice and the relationship between ideas and practice. Aspects of judicial selection and administration, Canadian political culture and civil liberties will be examined for their effects on individuals, social groups, minorities, and criminal justice as a whole.

CRIM 1293 credits
Academic and Professional Development
(formerly CRIM 329)
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in the Criminal Justice program, in field placements, and on the job. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing writing skills. Opportunities will be provided for learners to assess their interests, values, beliefs, and ethical stance on critical issues. This course is required for all first-year Criminal Justice program students.

CRIM 1303 credits
Philosophy of Law
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will discuss natural law and positive law, law and morality, law and justice, law and civil disobedience, national and international law, as well as the social function of law and the validity and limitation of law. The course will also examine various treatments of responsibility, guilt, punishment, deterrence, and retribution. We will approach these issues from a historical perspective; this method will guide us to the significant questions and the various answers that have been offered.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CRIM 130 and PHIL 230 (formerly 130).

CRIM 1353 credits
Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective
Prerequisite(s): None
A general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. Prepares students for those law and law-related courses offered within the department. Considers the history of Canadian law, development of the Canadian Constitution, the system of Canadian courts and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course will consider the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and principles of statutory interpretation, and will also include the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Also examines the process of law reform in Canada.

CRIM 1513 credits
Introduction to Law Enforcement
Prerequisite(s): None
The course surveys law enforcement agencies, including their role in society, their organizational structure and management, and community expectations of their task. Specific police functions (e.g., patrol, investigation, traffic control, work with juveniles, crisis intervention) and powers (e.g., arrest, search and seizure) are closely examined. Attention is also given to the training of police officers and to policing as an occupation. Behavioural aspects of policing and an assessment of police effectiveness are emphasized.

CRIM 2012 credits
Physical Fitness Training I
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides an individualized fitness program utilizing modern health-club facilities and sophisticated evaluation procedures. Students will be required to attend health-club facilities three times per week.
Note: CRIM 201/202 cannot be taken concurrently.

CRIM 2022 credits
Physical Fitness Training II
Prerequisite(s): None
The course provides a continuation of CRIM 201. Each student's program will be re-evaluated and intensified.
Note: CRIM 201/202 cannot be taken concurrently.

CRIM 2032 credits
Peace Officer Use of Force
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students with an opportunity to learn and practise physical contact tactics specifically related to law enforcement.

CRIM 2053 credits
Police Psychology and Risk Assessment
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 105, or students with related work experience may request a prerequisite waiver from the instructor
This course provides an introduction to the assessment of risk for sexually deviant and violent behaviour. Students will learn the factors correlated to the prediction of violent and sexually deviant behaviour including psychopathy, mental illness, personality disorders, and developmental history. The effect of substance abuse on an individual's propensity for violence and criminal behaviour will also be explored

CRIM 2103 credits
Youth Crime and the Youth Justice System in Canada
Prerequisite(s): None
The course provides students with an analysis of the nature, prevalence, characteristics, and consequences of youth crime in Canada. It offers an overview of the political, social, legal, and criminological issues associated with youth crime in Canada. The historical development of Canada’s juvenile justice and child protection systems is examined as well as the legal framework established by the Youth Criminal Justice Act. That statute is reviewed in detail and in relation to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and various other international human rights standards. The objectives pursued by the youth criminal justice system are examined in relation to prevailing scientific and popular explanations of juvenile deviance and delinquency. The relative effectiveness of the youth justice system in preventing and responding to youth crime is also considered.

CRIM 2113 credits
Indigenous Peoples, Crime and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): None
An examination of some of the major historical and contemporary issues regarding indigenous peoples, crime, and the criminal justice system. Some of the issues to be explored include the impact of colonization, Aboriginal involvement with the police, courts, and corrections, government policies and programs aimed at reducing Aboriginal conflict with the law, and the increasing role of Aboriginal communities in implementing justice initiatives.

CRIM 2123 credits
Women, Crime and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the nature of crimes committed by females and some of the sociological, sociocultural, and sociopsychological explanations of this criminal and deviant behaviour. Women's experiences as survivors and victims of criminal behaviour and as professionals working within the criminal justice system will be explored. Societal responses to female victims, offenders, and professionals will be examined.

CRIM 2133 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
Independent reading and research topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Students interested in more information should contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department.

CRIM 2143 credits
Selected Topics
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will review theory, methods, and research results in a selected area of criminal justice. Students should check with the Criminology and Criminal Justice department to determine the content area for a particular semester.

CRIM 2153 credits
Theory and Practice of Restorative Justice
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides students with an introduction to the theory and practice of restorative justice. Theoretical, historical, and philosophical perspectives on restorative justice will be analyzed. Foundational principles and values of restorative justice will be explored in the context of restorative justice as a response to crime and violence distinct from traditional methods within the criminal justice system. A variety of processes and program models for restorative justice will also be examined with emphasis on program effectiveness.

CRIM 2203 credits
Research Methods in Criminology
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 100 and one of: CRIM 104, CRIM 105, PSYC 101 or SOC 101
This course is designed as an introduction to criminological research and is intended to develop the students' research and analytical skills. The course will focus on the theory of inquiry, the logic, reality and structure of criminological inquiry, and criminological data analysis and reporting.

CRIM 2303 credits
Criminal Law
Prerequisite(s): None
Investigates the nature, purpose, scope, sources and basic principles of criminal law within its historical and contemporary contexts. The evolution of such legal concepts as guilt, criminal responsibility, and due process of law is also studied. Current policy and legislation, e.g. the legislative policy inherent in the Criminal Code, the specific offenses and categories in the Criminal Code, the Young Offenders Act (Canada), the Protection of Children Act (B.C.), and the control and treatment of drug addicts, dangerous sexual offenders, habitual criminals, and mentally ill offenders, are examined in detail.

CRIM 2403 credits
Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 103
This course offers an introduction to the study of several criminal justice systems. Specific focus will be placed on the role of political institutions, criminal law, history, and culture on the development of criminal justice systems. This course will also provide students with the opportunity to explore how different criminal justice systems respond to common problems,
issues, and events.
Note: Students with credit for CRIM 460 may not take CRIM 240 for further credit

CRIM 2503 credits
Customs and Immigration Law
Prerequisite(s): None
For students considering a career in customs or immigration, as well as for those with particular interest in this area, this course examines the Customs and Excise division of Revenue Canada, as well as the federal Immigration department, from an organizational and legal perspective. The course covers the role of Customs and Excise as a part of the Revenue Canada mandate, relevant legislation such as the Customs Act and the Narcotic Control Act, current issues surrounding Customs policies, as well as internal regulatory procedures (e.g., search and seizure, appeal procedures and citizen's rights). Also included are the other issues which relate to the Customs and Immigration authority, such as primary duties and relevant sections of the Criminal Code of Canada.

CRIM 2613 credits
Investigative Interviewing
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 160
This course explores the theory and practice of police (investigative) interviewing and interrogation. Course content will include the application of law (procedural and evidentiary), along with the application of psycho-physiological, psychological, and analytical paradigms. The course will include simulated exercises where such theories are applied to the practice of police interviewing and interrogation.

CRIM 2623 credits
Field Mentoring
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 151 and CRIM 160
This course introduces students to the leadership role of the (police) field coach. It emphasizes the theory of coaching for performance techniques, but also provides practical instructional techniques for coaches (e.g., coaching for tutoring, for confrontation, and for skill building), as well as learning strategies for the person being coached. The course reviews problem oriented policing theory and how it should be used by police cadets for solving projects.

CRIM 2633 credits
Police Supervision
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 160
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of personnel supervision. Topics include effective communication with subordinates, peers, supervisors, and the general public; effective interviewing and counselling skills; and identifying leadership styles and the use of a flexible approach to applying different leadership styles.

CRIM 2643 credits
Interactive Leadership
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 160
This course explores the theory and practice of leadership in policing, emphasizing the interpersonal and relational attributes and processes of leaders. Leadership and management are compared and contrasted, and the leader's role in developing an ethical workforce is examined. Seminal motivational concepts are reviewed, particularly as they apply to the policing environment, and these concepts are used in the study of employee commitment. The coaching role of the leader is analyzed, and various coaching functions (coaching for assistance, tutoring, performance, correction and growth) are reviewed and practised. A feedback system is reviewed and practised and issues specific to both problem performance and troubled employees are addressed. Finally, leadership priorities and value management concerns are reviewed.

CRIM 2653 credits
Problem Management Skills for Criminal Justice Interventions
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will provide students with a foundation set of skills in preparation for problem interventions in common criminal justice situations. They will examine theories and develop skills for successful interventions. The course introduces strategies for negotiation, mediation, crisis management, conflict de-escalation, and facilitation of problem solving and decision-making. The course also includes a focus on the necessary ethical dimension of professional interventions in the criminal justice field. Students will also learn appropriate intervention strategies for a wide range of situations including one-to-one encounters, in team situations, and in organizations. The skills of personal mastery, interpersonal communication skills, interviewing skills, conflict management, and understanding of diversity, team leadership, decision making and problem solving models are also introduced and practiced.
NOTE: Students with CRIM 260 cannot take CRIM 265 for further credit.

CRIM 2704 credits
Introduction to Forensic Biology
Prerequisite(s): five university transfer courses, one of which must be from the following list: BIO 105, BIO 106, BIO 111, BIO 112 or CHEM 150
This course introduces the student to the techniques involved in locating, processing and interpreting forensic scenes with human remains. Students will learn to interpret the effects of biological and environmental factors on forensic scenes. Students will learn basic osteology so that they can identify human remains, determine their sex, age, ancestry, and stature and correctly interpret any associated trauma to the bones. This course includes a required one-day field exercise. Students must have a current tetanus shot.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CRIM 270 and BIO 270.

CRIM 2816 credits
Field Work Practicum
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 100, 103, 104 and 105, CRIM 160, and one of: (CMNS 125, CMNS 155 or ENGL 105 or higher); and instructor's permission
Supervised experience in work situations in which you may later be employed. You will have an opportunity to practise skills gained in prerequisite courses and will receive feedback about your competencies. A field work practicum may be innovative and respond to community need. There will be a monthly feedback seminar with your instructor.
Note: Students must meet with the Career Development Coordinator to confirm a practicum placement and sign a practicum agreement prior to receiving permission to register.

CRIM 2913 credits
Theory and Practice of Criminal Investigations
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 151 and CRIM 160
This course is intended for those who are or will be responsible for the investigation and follow-up of criminal offences. Core topics provide a foundation for investigation skills, and include principles of human behaviour, effective communication techniques with victims, working with witnesses and offenders, principles of crime scene examinations, substantive criminal law and criminal evidence and procedure (e.g., principles of taking statements and confessions), human source handling, and the investigation of high profile offences. The intent is to achieve a sound approach to handling any investigative responsibilities.

CRIM 2926 credits
Theory and Practice of Drug Investigations
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 151 and CRIM 160
This course examines the unique investigative procedures that are essential to drug enforcement and the investigation of major drug offences. The course also examines the statutes and jurisprudence uniquely related to drug enforcement. Topics include professionalism, street level enforcement, and investigations relating to importing, exporting, cultivating, and trafficking.

CRIM 2933 credits
Theory and Practice of Fire Investigations II
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 151, CRIM 160, and either CRIM 291 or CRIM 292
This course examines basic fire investigation techniques that, when combined with expert assistance, will enhance the success of fire investigations, which are recognized as among the most difficult types of investigations. In particular, the course examines how fire scene investigations can scientifically determine whether the fire was deliberately set. The course includes field studies (labs) to introduce students to actual on-the-scene fire investigations.

CRIM 2953 credits
Theory and Practice of Accident Investigation II
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program
This course examines the theory and practice of traffic collision investigations and is designed for police who specialize in traffic accident investigations and general duty officers whose responsibilities include investigating vehicle collisions. The course will provide investigators with advanced skills and techniques for understanding accident dynamics, reconstructing accidents from objective evidence, documenting collision investigations, assessing liability, and giving expert court evidence

CRIM 2966 credits
Theory and Practice of Accident Investigation III
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program, CRIM 295 and Principles of Math 11
Recommended: CMNS 235 or Effective Presentation course, and Airbrake Inspection course
This course examines the theory and practice of traffic collision investigations and is designed for police who specialize in traffic accident investigations. It will provide investigators with advanced skills and techniques for understanding accident dynamics, reconstructing accidents from objective evidence, documenting collision investigations, assessing liability, and giving expert court evidence. This course builds upon the skills learned in Accident Investigation Level II. As a result, students who successfully complete Level III can be qualified to present "expert" (opinion) evidence in court and in coroner's inquests.

CRIM 2993 credits
The Theory and Practice of Sexual Assault Investigations
Prerequisite(s): None
This course explores the issues relevant to a police officer assigned to investigate cases of sexual offences, including sexual offences against children, in the Canadian criminal justice system. It examines the investigative process and follows a case from reporting to sentencing. Examined in some detail are Criminal Code sexual offences, rules of evidence and procedure related to sex-crime prosecutions, the accommodations for children and/or vulnerable witnesses and the control and treatment of sex offenders, and dangerous offenders including youthful offenders. The course also examines where the social science and law meet to embrace the complexity of these cases.

CRIM 3103 credits
Advanced Theoretical Perspectives
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits), and CRIM 100, 104 and 105
This course explores the diverse nature of theory within the field of crime and deviance by focusing on modern and post-modern theories. The selected paradigms are studied with regard to their explanatory domain, role in examining social and criminological problems, and research implications.

CRIM 3113 credits
Multiculturalism, Conflict, and Social Justice
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 103
This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the conflict which various cultural and ethnic groups have experienced, historically and during contemporary times, with the criminal law and the criminal justice system in Canada. This course examines the multicultural fabric of Canadian society and its implications for social and criminal justice. This course examines some of the critical areas related to cultural and ethnic groups and the criminal justice system. Students will be exposed to a myriad of materials and ideas and be challenged to consider the complex issues which surround crime and criminal justice in a multicultural society.

CRIM 3205 credits
Quantitative Research Techniques
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits), a C or better in MATH 104 and nine credits of lower-level Criminology including Criminology 220.
Corequisite(s): none
This course is designed to more fully introduce criminology and criminal justice students to applied social research. Emphasis is placed on developing practical experience in a variety of research methods and techniques. Students will become familiar with quantitative research methods. Experience will be gained in questionnaire design, data analyses and technical report writing. Some of the problems routinely confronting research practitioners are also examined. Students will also gain practical experience in using a statistical program on computers to analyze data.

CRIM 3303 credits
Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 103 and 230
Critical examination of selected topics in criminal procedure and evidence. Analysis and cross-national comparisons of how criminal cases are processed through the court system. Brief survey of the system of rules and standards by means of which the admissibility of evidence is determined. Close examination of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its impact on criminal procedure and evidence.

CRIM 3353 credits
Human Rights and Civil Liberties
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100. POSC 110 is strongly recommended
A study of the relationship between government and individuals. This course focuses on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its interpretation by our judiciary. It includes an examination of the issues of equality before the law, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, hate literature, and obscenity, as well as consideration of the rights of incarcerated individuals and the rights of individuals designated as mentally disordered. It also includes an examination of "victimless crimes", such as drug use, prostitution, and gambling, as areas of civil libertarian concern.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CRIM 335 and POSC 335

CRIM 3393 credits
Professional Ethics in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 103, and acceptance into the diploma in Criminal Justice program or into a degree program
This course studies professional ethics in the criminal justice system, with a special focus on law enforcement. The course will be organized into four subject areas: ethics education; dominant theoretical approaches (social contract, utilitarianism, formalism, and virtue theory); development of professional ethics; and ethical leadership. These subjects will be grounded in contemporary issues that criminal justice practitioners must address on a daily basis.

CRIM 3916 credits
The Theory and Practice of Major Case Management
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 151 and CRIM 160, and one of CRIM 291or CRIM 292 or CRIM 392
The proliferation of complex and serious incidents across the country makes it essential for investigative agencies to maintain personnel capable of managing major case (large and complex) investigations. This course provides qualified investigators with the knowledge and skills required to macro-manage the resources and the direction/speed/flow of a coordinated and/or integrated investigation team using a criminal investigative approach.

CRIM 3926 credits
The Theory and Practice of Major Crime Investigation
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 151 and CRIM 160, and either CRIM 291 or CRIM 292
This course is designed to provide experienced police officers who are assigned to investigate major crimes with the skills, knowledge and abilities to conduct successful investigations into crimes such as murder, sexual assault, child abuse, conspiracy and other complex crimes. The course examines topics related to advanced law (statements, search and seizure), advanced forensics (such as DNA and blood spatter evidence), and crime analysis.

CRIM 3933 credits
Criminal Intelligence and Crime Analysis
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 151 and CRIM 160
This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of criminal intelligence in the Canadian law enforcement setting. The broad themes covered include tactical, strategic and environmental intelligence; sources and methods of gathering intelligence; intelligence analysis and its application; management of intelligence; linking intelligence to enforcement; and risks and limitations of intelligence. The overall goal of the course is to impart an understanding of how criminal intelligence practices can be applied within contemporary Canadian policing, in a manner which is both relevant to enforcement and conditioned by case law and applicable statutes.

CRIM 3946 credits
Theory and Practice of Accident Investigation IV
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the BGS Police Studies program; and CRIM 296
[Airbrake Inspection course and Motorcycle Operator Training recommended]
This course examines the theory and practice of traffic collision investigations and is designed for police who specialize in traffic accident investigations. It will provide investigators with advanced skills and techniques for understanding accident dynamics, reconstructing accidents from objective evidence, documenting collision investigations, assessing liability, and giving expert court evidence. The course builds upon the skills learned in Accident Investigation Level II and Level III, where some of the topics are similar but the material is more advanced and complex.

CRIM 4103 credits
Selected Topics in Crime and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Will vary depending on topic: permission of Criminology and Criminal Justice department or the instructor.
This course critically reviews theory, methods, and research results in a selected area of criminal justice. Students should check with the Criminology and Criminal Justice department or the timetable to determine content area and prerequisites for a particular semester.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4113 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Instructor's permission
Independent reading and research topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Students interested in more information should contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4123 credits
Organized Crime
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 103
This course will examine the issues surrounding organized crime in North American society, while advancing a critical analysis of this subject area. The analysis will primarily be grounded in theory as well as in an applied research approach which emphasizes a police and government functional and operational perspective. While concentrating on sociological and criminological theory, the approach to this topic is multi-disciplinary and will involve other fields, including economics, history, political science, criminal intelligence, and operations theory, among others.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4133 credits
History and Philosophy of Police Practices
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 151
This course surveys contemporary police practices (such as organization, enforcement emphasis, recruiting, community relations, role in politics, response to crime, use of force) in the modern world, with a special emphasis on democratic states. Consequently, international police practices will be examined in the context of their historical and philosophical roots. Although there will be a special emphasis on policing in Canada, the general concept of policing in a democracy will be examined through a comparative study of policing in countries such as England, the United States, France, Israel, and others.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4143 credits
Intervention Techniques in Corrections
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 101
This course will examine the methods and means that criminal justice system personnel and associated professionals use to change criminal behaviour. The primary focus of these intervention techniques is to reduce recidivism. The course will review techniques that span from supervision to psychotherapy both inside and outside of jail or prison. The course is to develop the ability to critically analyze the theoretical foundations and treatment effectiveness (e.g., quantitative outcome research) of approaches in this area.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4153 credits
Safe Schools: Moving from Policy to Practice
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits).
This course explores issues related to safer schools and communities by examining the nature and extent of intimidation and harassment in schools; educational and administrative responses to various aspects of school safety; and, educational and administrative strategies to develop healthier and more inclusive educational settings. Philosophical and sociological discussions of educating for citizenship will provide the theoretical framework for our examination of safer schools.

CRIM 4163 credits
Media, Crime, and Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 103
This course focuses on the relationship between society's primary system of information dissemination, the media, and its primary system of social control and social value legitimation, the criminal justice system. Various aspects of this relationship are examined, with particular reference to the "social construction of reality", the notion that the media are especially important in constructing our image of the social world, which we come to accept as "objective" social reality. Topics include the constructionist view of the role of media in society; contextual and content analysis of media content; gender, crime and the media; crime and justice in the news; the role of the media in creating and maintaining ideologies about crime; media influences on attitudes and beliefs about crime and the criminal justice system; media distortion and sensationalism; media as a cause of crime; and media as a cure for crime.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4173 credits
Leadership in Groups and Organizations
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits), BUS 203 or BUS 307 and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100
This course will prepare those currently in supervisory or management positions (or those who seek to be) to assess and develop their potential for leadership. Learners will understand the differences between leadership and management, study an overview of leadership theory, and learn a new model for transformative leadership interventions in groups and organizations. As potential agents of positive change, students will assess and develop key knowledge and skill areas which will enable them to facilitate the development of individuals, groups and organizations. Finally, learners will develop the ability to shift styles, skills and roles appropriately, thereby increasing the effectiveness of their interventions. The knowledge and skills in this course will be applicable to a wide range of settings in the criminal justice system.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4183 credits
Techniques of Crime Prevention
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 103
Critical examination of the contemporary field of crime prevention. This course will examine the theoretical foundations of various approaches to crime prevention and the evaluative research available to assess the efficacy of these initiatives.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4193 credits
Victimology
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 103
Analysis of the phenomenon of criminal victimization. Review historical development of victimology, its scope and subject matter. Characteristics of the victim population and the profile of the typical victim. An in-depth analysis of the extent and patterns of criminal victimization, victimizers' attitudes to their victims, victim/target selection. Examination of the theoretical explanations of the differential risks of criminal victimization, focusing on multiple victimization, lifestyle/routine activity/opportunity models and the possibility of developing an integrated model of criminal victimization.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 4206 credits
Research Project/Seminar
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and CRIM 320
This course is designed as an upper-level research seminar in criminology and criminal justice. To successfully meet the requirements of this seminar, students must first demonstrate an ability to review and critique examples of research within Criminology and Criminal Justice. This component of Criminology 420 requires students to assume an active and independent role in acquiring and demonstrating research expertise. Secondly, students must complete a research project. Relying on research skills acquired in Mathematics 104, Criminology 220 and Criminology 320, students are expected to demonstrate their ability to design and complete a research project in a timely fashion.

CRIM 4216 credits
Research Proposal
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program, CRIM 220
This course is designed as an upper level university research seminar in criminology and criminal justice. It consists of lectures, seminars, labs, online lab assignments, and individual student consultation with the professor. These activities combined are structured to guide students through to the main requirement of the course -- the completion of a detailed research proposal.
CRIM 421 is a six credit course. As such students will be expected to undertake a greater amount of work than normally required in a typical three credit course. Further, the course is based on the assumption that incoming students are reasonably well versed in research methods. It is also assumed that since the course is primarily intended as a proposal/research seminar, students will take a very active and independent role in acquiring and demonstrating their research expertise.
Note: Students with CRIM 420 cannot obtain further credit for CRIM 421.

CRIM 4303 credits
Advanced Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 330 and Acceptance into a degree program ( with a minimum of 45 university transferable credits) and 9 credits of lower level CRIM which must include CRIM 230
This course provides students with a critical examination of the process for obtaining and executing search warrants in Canada. An analysis of the principles and legal issues relating to each phase of the warrant process will be conducted. A close examination of the Charter of Rights of Freedoms, the laws of evidence and their impact on search warrant process will be included. The course builds on the content introduced in CRIM 330.

CRIM 4503 credits
Social Policy Analysis
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 103
This course explores various aspects of policy, planning, and analysis as they relate to social policy and criminal justice policy.

CRIM 4704 credits
Advanced Forensic Biology
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 270 or BIO 270
This course further develops the investigative techniques and methodology of forensic biology. Topics of further study will include the investigation and methods of processing and interpreting human remains. Students will use biological and physical features of the environment to interpret remains recovered from buried, scattered, underwater (ocean and freshwater), and arson scenes. Advanced studies will examine juvenile and developmental osteology. New advancements in the field involving DNA and individualizing techniques will also be examined. This course includes a required one-day field exercise. Students must have a current tetanus shot and steel toed boots.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CRIM 470 and BIO 470.

CRIM 4806 credits
Field Work Practicum
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 280 or 281, CRIM 310, CRIM 311, CRIM 320, CRIM 330, CRIM 335, and instructor's permission
Supervised work experience in a criminal justice agency. The goals and objectives of this course are similar to the field work practicum in CRIM 281/281 however, higher levels of performance are required.

CRIM 4816 credits
Field Work Practicum
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 281, CRIM 310, CRIM 311, CRIM 320, CRIM 330, CRIM 335 and instructor's permission
This is a supervised work experience in a criminal justice or community agency. The goals and objectives of this course are similar to the field work practicum in CRIM 280/281; however, more advanced levels of performance are required. (enrollment in this course is by prior arrangement with the Career Development Coordinator, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice)

CRIM 7003 credits
Crime, Criminals, Victims, and the Criminal Justice System
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This is a foundations course which will critically examine the goals, structure, and practices of the criminal justice system in terms of its capacity to respond to the problems of crime and criminals, and the needs of victims and the community. Attention will be given to what we can learn from criminal justice systems, initiatives, and best practices internationally from a historical perspective. Special attention will be given to our approach to current, emerging, and long-standing problems in the Canadian criminal justice system.

CRIM 7053 credits
Policy Analysis and Social Justice
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to examine major issues in the field of policy analysis within a framework of social justice. Students will develop an understanding of a variety of policy and analysis models and major analytical activities including the examination of the social, political, historical, and economic context within which policy alternatives are assessed; the identification and mapping of interest group and stakeholder dynamics; and the application of efficacy criteria to policy options. Students will examine the foundational role that problem construction plays in policy development and analysis. The course will bridge the theoretical and conceptual components of policy analysis with practical applications of the techniques.

CRIM 7103 credits
Change Management in the Criminal Justice System
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course will focus on the application of systems theory, and the principles and theories of change to the management of criminal justice systems. Attention will be give to challenges in implementing change, why certain policies and practices seem resistant to change, and the role of activism and leadership in creating change. Students will learn how to anticipate, plan, implement, and evaluate change. They will also learn how to write and present a change management plan. There will be a focus on change and future trends throughout the course.

CRIM 7154 credits
Advanced Research Methods
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course focuses on the knowledge and skills students need to conduct both qualitative and quantitative research, critique published research, and build research designs from a theoretical perspective and action research framework. Special attention will be given to data collection, construction, and qualitative analysis, and statistical techniques using SPSS.

CRIM 7203 credits
Community Development, Justice Initiatives, and Governance in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course examines the changing role and capacity of government and criminal justice agencies in responding to crime. The emphasis will be on analysis of "responsibilization" and mobilization strategies involving individuals, families, community organizations, the private sector, and communities in general. Special attention will be given to social justice initiatives, partnership models, governing at a distance, and the need for new, innovative, and broadly-based approach to crime prevention.

CRIM 7253 credits
Evaluation Research
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop an understanding of different evaluative designs and the role that theory, methods, and statistics play in the field of program evaluation. Students will use a framework of evidence-based decision-making to guide their exploration of program logic models, process and outcome evaluative designs, settings in which evaluations are conducted, and ethical considerations of evaluation research. This course will enable students to design and conduct evaluation studies and will contribute to their ability to engage in program and policy development.

CRIM 7303 credits
Ethical and Legal Issues in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
The emphasis of this course will be on professional (applied) ethics within the field of criminal justice and as such will focus on how practitioners ought to treat others within the context of their respective vocations. To ground the discussion, the connection between the idea of morality and theories of ethics will be explored, along with the progressively dominant role that law is currently playing in professional ethics. At the same time, there will be an analysis of contemporary issues, both ethical and legal, that are especially relevant in the criminal justice professions. The objective is that students, from both moral and legal points of view, will be able to justify positions taken on ethical dilemmas and problems that they are likely to face within their chosen professions.

CRIM 7353 credits
Leadership and Organizational Development in the Criminal Justice System
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course prepares students to conduct leadership competency assessments and organizational effectiveness audits, and to design and implement strategic plans. There is a special emphasis in the course on the theory and practice of quality management through continuous improvement initiatives that lead to the development of a learning organization that can demonstrate accountability for the achievement of organizational objectives.

CRIM 7403 credits
Criminal Justice Planning and Budgeting
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course is designed to help students understand the interactive process and political context of planning and financial management, principles of accounting and public sector budgeting, audits, and the requirements of budget preparation.

CRIM 7453 credits
Human Resource Administration
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course focuses on issues in personnel management relating to job analysis, performance appraisal, productivity assessment, compensation, recruitment, selection, promotion, career development, disciplinary systems and civil liability, collective bargaining agreements and other labour management matters.

CRIM 7503 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program. Chair of Graduate Studies Program approval required.
This course allows students to focus on a specific criminal justice issue from a particular perspective, including perspectives from disciplines other than criminal justice.

CRIM 7553 credits
Selected Topics in Criminal Justice
Prerequisite(s): CRIM 700, 705, 710, 715, 720, 725, 798
This course critically reviews topics in advanced theory, methods, and research in criminal justice. Topics will vary with instructor.


CRIM 7606 credits
Internship
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program, completion of CRIM 700, CRIM 705, CRIM 710, CRIM 715, CRIM 720, CRIM 725, and CRIM 798. Faculty approval required
The internship offers students the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills gained through the program to a full-time four-month practicum experience by assuming a key role in program or policy development, implementation, or evaluation in a criminal justice agency or organization concerned with criminal justice issues. The internship will also provide an opportunity for students to study specific criminal justice practices abroad, and for students who wish to focus on a criminal justice issue from an international perspective.

CRIM 7981 credit
Thesis/Project Preparation Seminar
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program
This course is designed to help students develop their thesis/project proposal. The course will focus on refining research questions, and developing a specific research plan, setting the foundation for agency and key stakeholder involvement, ethics approval, and thesis/project requirements. It will also emphasize the importance of conducting a thesis/project from a leadership perspective. Students will be expected to produce a draft proposal as a primary requirement for the course.

CRIM 7996 credits
Thesis, Major Research Paper, or Extended Essay
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program, and thesis, major research paper, or extended essay approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies.
The thesis, major research paper, or extended essay provides the student with an opportunity to design, conduct, and submit an original piece of research based on a student's interest.

Last updated: March 31, 2007Top


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