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English
Placement in your first English university-level course (ENGL 105 and above) for students lacking specific course prerequisites depends on your Composition Placement Test (CPT) score. If it is 41–47, take ENGL 081, 091, or 099 as preparation for more advanced English courses. Students whose score is lower than 41 should attend a College and Career Preparation orientation and assessment for placement in ENGL 051, 061, or 071. If your score is between 48 and 67, we strongly recommend that you take ENGL 105 before registering in any course numbered above 105. If your CPT score is higher than 67 and you feel confident that you do not need ENGL 105, you may begin with ENGL 120, 130, 150, or 170. Students whose CPT is below 41 and whose first language is not English should enroll in English as a Second Language training. Students who require English 11 (081) or English 12 (091) as prerequisites to other programs should contact the CCP department.
Students who have an A in English 12 or English Literature 12 do not need to write the CPT in order to register in ENGL 105–170.
Note: An LPI score of 30/40 (Level 5) on the essay section is considered equivalent to a CPT score of 48; a score of 24-26 (Level 4) is equivalent to a CPT score of 41.
For Literature in Translation courses, please see French 350, 360 and Russian 251, 252, 351, 352.


English Language Requirements
Beginning Fall, 2007 students registering in post-secondary level courses (numbered 100 to 499) will be required to meet the English language entrance proficiency requirements. Students in ESL or the University Foundations programs can register in those courses identified in the University Foundations program with lower levels of language proficiency.

ENGL 0513 credits
Fundamental English I
Prerequisite(s): CCP department permission (assessment may be required).
This course develops beginning reading, sentence writing, spelling, and oral communication skills. It is a course for adults who wish to obtain the basic literacy skills required for personal, workplace, and educational settings. This course is not designed for English as a Second Language students.

ENGL 0613 credits
Fundamental English II
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 051 or CCP department permission (assessment may be required).
This course develops strategies for reading short stories and articles, paragraph writing, spelling, grammar, vocabulary development, oral communications, and study skills. It is not designed as a course for English as a Second Language
students unless they are referred by the ESL department and assessed by the CCP department.

ENGL 0713 credits
Intermediate English
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 061, LPI essay score of 18-23 (level 3), or CCP department permission (assessment may be required).
This course develops proficiency in reading comprehension, paragraph composition, vocabulary development, sentence variety, grammar, punctuation, spelling, study skills, critical thinking, and interpersonal communication skills. An
introduction to essay writing is included. This course is not designed for English as a Second Language students.

ENGL 0813 credits
Advanced English
Prerequisite(s): One of the following: ENGL 071, English 11 with a C or better, English 12 with a C or better, LPI essay score of 24 or higher (level 4), CPT score of 41 or better, or CCP department permission (assessment may be required).
This university preparatory course develops in-depth skills in the writing process, reading, critical thinking, literary analysis, research, grammar, and oral communications. Emphasis is placed on developing essay writing and research skills. Completion of ENGL 081 with a C+ or better satisfies the prerequisite requirement for ENGL 105.

ENGL 0913 credits
Provincial English
(Pre-College Introduction to Literature and Composition)
Prerequisite(s): One of the following: ENGL 081, English 11 with a C+ or better, English 12 with a C or better, ENGL 099 with a C or better, LPI essay score of 24 or higher (level 4), CPT score of 41 or better, or CCP department permission (assessment may be required).
This university preparatory course introduces students to fiction, poetry, and drama at the Grade 12 level, preparing them for the challenges of post-secondary English courses. Development of essay-writing skills is a major component of this
course. ENGL 091 satisfies the Grade 12 English requirement of the B.C. Adult Graduation Diploma (adult secondary completion). Completion of ENGL 091 with a C+ or better satisfies the prerequisite requirement for ENGL 105.

ENGL 0993 credits
Pre-College Composition
(formerly ENGL 101)
Prerequisite(s): English 12 with a B or better, or CPT score 41 or better
Corequisite(s): None
This is a pre-college composition course designed to prepare students for the writing requirements of college-level courses.
NOTE: Students may not take CMNS 099 for further credit.

ENGL 1043 credits
Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction, Poetry and Drama
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will introduce students to the fundamental techniques of creative writing, in the three basic genres of fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will learn to use these techniques in their own writing, enhancing both their academic and non-academic work.

ENGL 1053 credits
The Reading and Writing of Prose
Prerequisite(s): One of the following:
CPT score of 48 or better
CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better
ENGL 081 or 091 with a grade of C+ or better
ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better
Completion of Level II of UCFV's University Foundation Certificate Program
English 12 or English Literature 12 with a final grade of A
Success in previous university transfer English course
LPI score of 30/40 or level 5 or better in the essay section
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE (Essay) score of 4.0
MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery) score of at least 85
CAEL (Canadian Academic English Language) score of at least 70
CanTEST score of at least 4.5 in Listening and Reading and a score of 4.0 in Writing
Cambridge Proficiency Examination — competence level of C
IELTS (International English Language Testing System) score of at least 6.5 with no band less than 6.0
UCFV English Language Assessment — results equivalent to completion of UCFV's University Foundation Certificate Program Level 2 compulsory ESL core courses or articulated equivalent
A workshop for students who want to improve their ability to read and write non-fiction prose. Selected readings from an essay anthology help introduce the principles and practice of writing clear and effective sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Students who are not fully confident of their essay-writing ability are strongly advised to take this course before they embark on other UCFV courses which require essays.

ENGL 1093 credits
Introduction to the English Language
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in ENGL 099 or CMNS 099 C or better, or C+ in CCP ENGL 081 or 091, or success in a previous university-transferable English course.
ENGL 109 approaches the introductory study of the English language with three principal objectives in mind. Students will acquire an elementary vocabulary for the analysis of word-formation and semantics, gain a basic knowledge of the origin and development of Present Day English vocabulary, and explore critical approaches to the use and abuse of the language as they experience it in their daily lives. While the course is intended to engage the non-specialist student with no previous exposure to the study of language, it lays a foundation for subsequent study not only of the structure and history of English, but of composition and rhetoric, as well as linguistics.

ENGL 1113 credits
Creative Writing: Screenwriting
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will introduce students to the fundamental techniques and principles of screenwriting in various styles, including dramatic, documentary and experimental forms. Students will complete several short assignments during the semester, as well as one 8-10 page script. Complementary topics will include script analysis and the writing of treatments and proposals. Students will be
required to give at least one in-class presentation. Screenplays and Proposals will be workshopped in class.

ENGL 1203 credits
Introduction to Modern Fiction
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in ENGL 099, or C+ in CCP ENGL 081 or 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
A study of some of the main themes and techniques in the modern novella, novel, and short story. Students will read these literary forms attentively and discuss them articulately.

ENGL 1303 credits
Introduction to Modern Drama
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in ENGL 099, or C+ in CCP ENGL 081 or 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
An introduction to dramatic literature, focusing chiefly on 20th century plays. A variety of forms of drama are read, seen where possible, and discussed.

ENGL 1503 credits
Introduction to Modern Poetry
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in ENGL 099, or C+ in CCP ENGL 081 or 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
An introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques of poetry, focusing on the works of 20th century poetry. Students are encouraged to read poetry sensitively, to listen appreciatively to the poetic voice, and to write about the works analytically.

ENGL 1653 credits
Word and Image
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces students to an integrated, inter-dependent form of writing and video. Students will explore and practice the techniques of both means of expression – narrative and non-narrative writing styles, narrative and non-narrative video styles – progressing to the process of “layering”, i.e. what kind of textual elements work with images and what kind of visual elements work with text. Students will also explore the traditional process of bringing words to the screen by first creating the script for production as well as the nontraditional process of using image or text as a “springboard” for discovering the ultimate form for the work.
Note: This course is offered as both VA 165 and ENGL 165. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 1703 credits
Literature in Context
(formerly ENGL 110)
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or better, or a grade of C or better in ENGL 099, or C+ in CCP ENGL 081 or ENGL 091, or success in a previous university-transfer English course
This course centres on specific themes or cultural fields of study that will vary with the instructor. Areas of interest may include the diasporic literatures; aboriginal cultures; gay, lesbian, and bisexual writings; and period or theme-based studies. The course will feature literary texts drawn from various genres, which may include historical narratives and documents, films, videos, or visual art displays.

ENGL 2013 credits
English Literature, 14th-17th Century Major Authors: Chaucer to Milton
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
An introduction to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Shakespearean drama, Milton's Paradise Lost, and to other 15th to 17th century verse and prose. Essays and an examination are required.
Your appreciation of English literature will be enhanced by studying History 109 either previously to, or concurrently with, ENGL 201.

ENGL 2023 credits
English Literature, 18th-20th Century Major Authors: Pope to Yeats
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
Students will study 18th century writers such as Pope, Swift, Johnson and the early novelists; the rebellion against reason led by Blake and the Romantic poets; Victorians such as George Eliot and Dickens; and the literary innovators of the 20th century such as Woolf, Shaw, Yeats and Joyce. Your appreciation of English literature will be enhanced by studying History 110 either previously to, or concurrently with, ENGL 202.

ENGL 2043 credits
Mediaeval Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
Corequisite(s): None
Students will read a selection of mostly 14th-century English texts, including works by Chaucer, the Gawain-poet, Langland, Kempe, Gower, and others, as well as popular lyrics, Mystery, and Morality plays. They will gain an elementary knowledge of Middle English as well as develop an understanding of the artistic, religious, social, and political conditions which shaped Mediaeval culture, through readings of representative texts.

ENGL 2053 credits
The English Renaissance
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher.
Corequisite(s): None
This course will study the major Renaissance writers in English from 1550 to 1660 and features Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton.

ENGL 2063 credits
The Classical and the Romantic
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
Corequisite(s): None
The course will study the transition in English literature from 1660 to 1830 from a largely "classical" vision to a "romantic" one and features Pope, Swift, Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats.

ENGL 2073 credits
Victorian and Early Modern Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
Corequisite(s): None
This course will study the major authors in English from 1830 to 1930 such as Tennyson, Browning, Dickens, George Eliot, Yeats, Hardy, Joyce, and Woolf.

ENGL 2093 credits
The Structure of the English Language
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100 level English courses (ENGL 105 or higher)
This course will introduce students to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of modern English. While the course will focus on a descriptive approach to linguistic analysis, students will also examine issues of meaning and usage, with particular reference to Canadian English.

ENGL 2103 credits
Composition
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher; or CMNS 125 and 251; or CMNS 155 and 251;
Students analyze aspects of academic discourse and compare this with discourse for other communities. Students also work to improve their own writing for academic readers as well as for general and specific readers.

ENGL 2113 credits
Creative Writing: Play-Writing
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any first year literature course, ENGL 120 or higher
This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of play-writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established playwrights are studied as models. Students produce their own dramatic writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom discussion.

ENGL 2123 credits
Creative Writing: Fiction
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any first year literature course, ENGL 120 or higher
This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of short fiction writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established writers are studied as models. Students produce their own writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom discussion.

ENGL 2133 credits
Creative Writing: Poetry
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any first-year literature course, ENGL 120 or higher
This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of poetry writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established writers are studied as models. Students produce their own writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom. discussion.

ENGL 2143 credits
Writing and Rhetorical Theory
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
This course is an introduction to selected theories of composition and rhetoric. This theory course requires written essays and exams.

ENGL 2153 credits
Creative Writing: Creative Non-fiction
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any first-year literature course 120 or higher
Creative Non-fiction is a relatively new genre that is gaining critical attention. The course explores this genre's range and potential. Working with the personal essay as transformed by fictional elements and poetic technique, students will discover Creative Non-fiction's special capacity to explore and illuminate their worlds -- through their own travel, memoir and biographical writings, and by studying the works of skilled practitioners.

ENGL 2203 credits
Development of the British Novel
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
A study of the social and literary developments which made the novel possible, and the robust and varied works of the early novelists -- Defoe, Richardson, Fielding -- and their successors. ENGL 220 is occasionally offered in England.

ENGL 2253 credits
Classical Literature in Translation
(formerly ENGL 265)
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher, or instructor's permission
This course studies some of the most influential literature written in Greek and/or Latin from the period of Homer to the period of Virgil and Ovid.

ENGL 2263 credits
Renaissance Literature in Translation
(formerly ENGL 266)
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher, or instructor's permission
This course studies some of the most influential literature written in Europe from the period of Dante and Petrarch to the period of Cervantes and Moliere.

ENGL 2273 credits
European Literature in Translation, 1750-1940
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher, or instructor's permission
This course surveys literary developments in Europe between the 18th and 20th centuries, enabling students to compare English with other national literatures. The readings clarify the nature of continental influences on English authors and literary movements.

ENGL 2283 credits
Topics in Aboriginal Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100 level English courses
This course will examine significant Aboriginal texts from a range of genres and traditions, and will focus on specific themes such as the oral tradition, the experience of Aboriginal women, colonialism/decolonization, and the literature of resistance.

ENGL 2303 credits
The Tragic in Western Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
This course examines representative dramatic texts from a variety of historical periods, with a view to understanding the forms, conventions, and concepts of tragedy in Western drama.

ENGL 2313 credits
The Comic in Western Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100 level English courses - ENGL 105 or higher
This course examines representative dramatic texts from a variety of historical periods, with a view to understanding the forms, conventions, and concepts of comedy in Western drama.

ENGL 2403 credits
An Introduction to Canadian Literature
(formerly ENGL 140)
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher, or instructor's permission
An introduction to influential figures and themes in Canadian literature. Students read the texts closely, discuss them articulately in the classroom, and identify major themes and styles. Essays and an examination are required for university- transfer credit.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both ENGL 140 and ENGL 240.

ENGL 2453 credits
Indian Literature in English
Prerequisite(s): Any two first-year English courses
This course examines Indian literature written in English in its social and historical contexts. The course focuses primarily on fiction by Indo-Canadian authors, but course materials may include influential works by other Indian writers and works in other genres (e.g., autobiographies, essays, film).

ENGL 2503 credits
The Bible as Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher, or instructor's permission
A study of the principal literary forms found in the 1611 King James Bible, with emphasis on biblical narrative, poetry, comedy, romance and epic, and the centrality of the Bible to English literacy history.

ENGL 2543 credits
Women's Writing: 1000 to 1660
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses - ENGL 105 or higher
This course is a historical survey that follows the development of women’s writing from 1000 to 1660. It focuses on the selfrepresentation of women in medieval literature, history, and art.

ENGL 2553 credits
Women's Writing: 1660 to 1900
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses - ENGL 105 or higher
This course is a historical survey that follows the development of women’s writing from 1660 to 1900. It will include major authors such as Aphra Behn, Mary Wollstonecraft, and the Brontës, as well as lesser known writers.

ENGL 2563 credits
Women's Writing: 1900 to the Present
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses - ENGL 105 or higher
This course is a historical survey that follows the development of women’s writing from 1900 to today. It focuses on the struggle for women’s equality as it is manifested in art, politics, and daily life.

ENGL 2633 credits
Life Writing
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100 level English courses - ENGL 105 or higher
This course will introduce students to life writing in English in the context of ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and community.

ENGL 2643 credits
Introduction to Literary Criticism
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses
This course will introduce the student to a range of literary theories and reading strategies. The objective is to broaden the student’s knowledge of the field and offer opportunities for the discussion and practice of literary criticism. The course will also prepare the student for more advanced studies in literary theory.

ENGL 2703 credits
Special Topics in Popular Fiction
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses -- ENGL 105 or higher
This course is a literary study of selected fictional genres popularized in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and/or twentieth centuries.
Note: The specific genre of study is denoted with a letter designation (i.e. ENGL 270c). Students may take ENGL 270 twice for credit as long as the letter designation differs, but may not take it more than twice to meet English major, minor or extended minor requirements.

ENGL 2743 credits
The Rhetoric of Science
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses; ENGL 105 or higher
What makes scientific communication persuasive and powerful? This course surveys answers to that question by analyzing the role of language in communicating science. The course also examines the nature of scientific knowledge and the values that influence the writing of science, providing students with approaches to analyzing and writing scientific texts.

ENGL 2753 credits
Literature and Ecology
Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level ENGL courses
This course examines a range of writing modes that explore the nature and origins of our contemporary environmental challenges. In reading, discussing and critiquing different kinds of ecologically-based writing, students will also develop their own composition skills in addition to cultivating an appreciation of the relations that have emerged between literature, natural science, and the environment. Topics will include the ‘romantic ecology’ of Wordsworth’s generation in response to the Industrial and Agrarian Revolutions, popular literary portraits of the Canadian wild, the development of current ‘ecological poetics’, and the evolution of ‘green’ criticism.

ENGL 2803 credits
Survey of Children's Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two first-year courses numbered 105 or higher
This course introduces students to the major streams of literature written in English for children from the 17th century through the "Golden Age" of children's literature in the Victorian period and the early part of the 20th century. The course will focus on major authors in classical children's literature and on the images of childhood presented in these works over time.

ENGL 3014 credits
Homer, Classicism, and English Literary History
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course is specifically designed to introduce students of English literature to the influence of Homer and other classical authors on the development of the English literary tradition.

ENGL 3033 credits
Writing Historical Fiction
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses. One of ENGL 211, 212, 213, or 215 recommended.
Historical Fiction is a genre combining traditional fiction elements with research and historical content. This course is an introduction to the creative elements and techniques associated with Historical Fiction writing. Works by skilled writers are analyzed and studied as models. As a writing-intensive course, students will experiment with the elements of Historical Fiction to produce their own writing samples, which are then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in the
workshop.

ENGL 3044 credits
Topics in Medieval literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will introduce students to the non-Chaucerian literature of the 14th and 15th centuries in England. Topics are based on individual themes, genres, or authors.

ENGL 3064 credits
Chaucer
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
Following a concise study of Chaucer’s Middle English, students will read representative selections from Chaucer’s poetic works in all genres, with particular emphasis on the Canterbury Tales.

ENGL 3094 credits
Topics in Renaissance Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course introduces students to writers and literature of the 16th and 17th centuries (excluding Shakespeare and Milton).

ENGL 3104 credits
Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will survey Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama, excluding Shakespeare's plays.

ENGL 3113 credits
Novel Writing
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses. One of ENGL 211, 212, 213, or 215 recommended.
This course further explores fiction writing, specifically the creative elements and techniques necessary to the popular genre of the novel. Excerpts of novels by skilled authors will be analyzed as models. Authors working in this genre will be invited to speak in the class. As a writing-intensive course, students will experiment with novel writing elements to produce their own writing samples,
which will then be critiqued by the instructor and classmates in the workshop.
PREREQUISITES: Any two 200-level English courses. One of ENGL 211, 212, 213, or 215

ENGL 3124 credits
Shakespeare
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course examines a representative sample of Shakespeare's plays selected from the "genres" of the works as they have been traditionally divided.

ENGL 3153 credits
Writing Children's Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses. One of ENGL 211, 212, 213, or 215 recommended.
A writing/seminar course detailing the elements specific to the genre of Children’s Literature. Samples of popular Children’s Literature will be used as models. As a writing-intensive course, students will learn techniques to produce successful children's literature in several genres. Writing produced in the class will be
critiqued in a workshop setting. Special emphasis will be placed on learning the skill of constructive critical analysis of new writing.

ENGL 3164 credits
Milton
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
The poetry and prose of John Milton will be examined.

ENGL 3184 credits
Major Authors of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century: Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will study Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson as well as some of their contemporaries.

ENGL 3194 credits
The Eighteenth-Century Novel
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses
The course will introduce students to the birth and early development of the English novel through such writers as Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, and Sterne.

ENGL 3234 credits
Special Topics in Romanticism
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course approaches the English Romantic period from a variety of perspectives that will vary with the instructor. Studies might, for example, focus on Blake and Archetypal Psychology, or Works by and Attitudes Toward Women, or The Politics of English Romanticism.

ENGL 3254 credits
British Literature, 1780-1830
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
A survey of literature published in England during the Romantic period, with emphasis on the poetry and poetics of Romanticism. Representative novels, essays, and other genres will also be studied.

ENGL 3334 credits
Nineteenth-Century British Novelists
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course will explore novels written by such major authors as Austen, Scott, Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Trollope, the Brontës, George Eliot, Hardy, Gissing, and George Moore.

ENGL 3354 credits
Topics in Victorian Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
Topics in Victorian literature will be drawn from the rich offerings in Victorian poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and art.

ENGL 3364 credits
English and Anglo-Irish Fiction, 1880s-1920s
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200 level English courses
Some of the major English and Anglo-Irish fiction writers -- Thomas Hardy, George Gissing, Joseph Conrad, E.M. Forster, Ford Maddox Ford, Katherine Mansfield, D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce -- will be studied.

ENGL 3384 credits
Studies in Modernism
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
Works by writers such as Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Kafka, Joyce, Beckett, and David Jones will be studied.

ENGL 3444 credits
American Prose and Poetry, Beginnings to the Civil War
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course is a survey of American authors and literary/national themes from the Colonial era to the eve of the Civil War.

ENGL 3484 credits
American Literature 1865-1910
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course offers a survey of major literary figures and movements from the Civil War to the eve of World War I. This course will pay particular attention to the rapid development of prose fiction under the influence of literary theories of realism and naturalism, and will demonstrate the contemporary "shock of the new" as registered in poetry, prose, and drama.

ENGL 3494 credits
Topics in American Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
Special topics in American literature can include the influence of Puritan theology on American literature, the American Renaissance, naturalism and realism in American literature, and American modernism.

ENGL 3504 credits
Survey of American Literature, 1914-1945
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course surveys the heralded American authors of the "Modern" period, including Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulker, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens.

ENGL 3524 credits
American Writers of World War II and Later
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course is a survey of the key authors and trends in modern and contemporary American writing since World War II.

ENGL 3544 credits
Canadian Poetry and Prose, Beginnings to 1920
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses
This course examines selected works by early Canadian writers, dating from the period of exploration up to the First World War. These texts introduce a variety of themes that have remained significant in Canadian studies: the impact of settlement on the wilderness, imperial loyalties, and relations with indigenous peoples.

ENGL 3564 credits
Modern Canadian Prose
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses
This course examines prose written in Canada from 1920 up to the present. Course readings are predominantly fiction – novels and short stories – but may include works in other prose genres, such as memoir and autobiography.

ENGL 3584 credits
Modern Canadian Poetry
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses
This course aims to help you appreciate the richness and diversity of Canadian poetry. The course readings range from the work of early twentieth-century poets such as EJ Pratt and FR Scott up to contemporary poetry by writers such as Don
McKay and Anne Carson.

ENGL 3604 credits
Topics in Canadian Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses
This course examines a significant theme or topic in Canadian literature such as the North, World War I, urbanization, or social protest. Typically, course materials include works in a variety of genres.

ENGL 3614 credits
Canadian Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
A literary study of drama as it has developed in Canada, with emphasis on contemporary plays, and on the richness of diversity in form and content. In addition to the reading, students are required to see and review live performances.

ENGL 3624 credits
Literature of British Columbia
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses
This course surveys the literature of British Columbia from its beginnings to the present. It examines such themes as the wilderness, urbanization, indigeneity, and multiculturalism. Course readings may include works in a variety of genres.

ENGL 3634 credits
Autobiography
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200 - level English courses
This course will study the major autobiographical writing in the West from Marcus Aurelius, Boethius, and Augustine through Rousseau, Adams, and Mill to present day writers.

ENGL 3644 credits
History and Principles of Literary Criticism
Prerequisite(s): Any two English courses 300 or higher
This course explores a selection of major critical statements about literature, ranging from the Greek classics to renaissance, romantic, and early modern constructions of the literary text. Topics may include the social and aesthetic function of literature as it has been variously conceived, the formal or philosophical parameters of the major genres, or the politics of the criticism itself.

ENGL 3664 credits
Studies in Critical Approaches to Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two English courses 300 or higher
This course surveys seminal texts in post-war and contemporary literary theory. Areas of concentration may include poststructuralism, psychoanalytic criticism, or Marxism. Students will apply one or two of these critical approaches to a sampling of literary works. Areas of concentration and course content will vary with the instructor.

ENGL 3684 credits
Special Topics in Drama
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses
This course offers a literary study of selected dramatic works which are
organized around a single topic. The topic might be a theme such as Theatre of Social Protest, a form or genre such as Theatre of the Absurd, a region such as Anglo-Irish drama, or a critical approach such as Metatheatre.

ENGL 3704 credits
The History of the English Language
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
The course explores the evolution of the English language from its origins in the West Germanic dialects established in England in the seventh century to its present position as an international medium for commerce and technology. Students will examine the linguistic, historical, and social factors that have influenced the language's development. Special attention will be paid to the rise of diverse national and regional variations of English.

ENGL 3714 credits
Advanced Composition: Theory and Practice
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course allows you to examine theories of rhetoric and composition, and to test those theories through your own writing and through observing and helping other students in their composing process.

ENGL 3724 credits
Canadian English
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses. LING 101 is recommended
This course explores the history and structure of English as spoken and written in Canada. In addition to examining the roots of Canadian English in both the British and North American contexts, students will compare the historical and contemporary dialects of the Canadian regions to explore the impact of history, geography, and ideology on the language as used. Readings will be drawn from a range of literary and non-literary sources. The course will begin with a brief introduction to the basic principles of linguistic analysis.

ENGL 3744 credits
Rhetoric: Advanced Composition
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course helps already strong writers further develop competence and flexibility in writing. Practical exercises and discussion cover features of writing for general, academic, and professional readers. The workshop classroom provides hands-on experience in drafting, evaluation, and revision.

ENGL 3754 credits
Rhetoric: Composition Theory
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course introduces students to the field of composition as it emerges from within university English departments in the 1960s. The readings and discussion will focus on ideas which have shaped the ways composition is both thought of and taught.

ENGL 3764 credits
Rhetoric: An Historical Survey
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course introduces students to definitions and roles of rhetoric through the centuries. Readings and discussion in this survey will point to the long-standing connections among language, persuasion and education. The readings cover major periods of rhetoric: Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Twentieth Century.

ENGL 3794 credits
Rhetoric: Composition Teaching
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course offers readings and discussion that traces trends in writing curriculum design, theories of writing pedagogy, and attitudes towards composition. Workshops teach students to understand assignment design and evaluation as well as curriculum design. This course is of value to prospective teachers.
Note: Students with ENGL 379 cannot take EDUC 379 for further credit.

ENGL 3804 credits
Studies in South Asia Literature
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
This course offers a historical survey of South Asian writing in English. It examines the contribution of such authors as Rabindranath Tagore, Mulk Raj Anand, Raja Rao, R. K. Narayan, and Salman Rushdie to the development of a South Asian literary tradition in English.

ENGL 3813 credits
Playwriting
Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses. ENGL 211 recommended.
This is a writing-intensive course. Students create and revise writing for the stage as well as constructively critique other students' writing. Classical and contemporary models are studied.

ENGL 3824 credits
India in English
Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses
During the colonial period, India was not merely a source of wealth and imperial power. It was also an endlessly fecund source of ideas, images, and influences. This course examines how various notions of India--the mysterious East, the origin of civilization, a place of spiritual discovery, a sensual paradise--entered into English culture. The major focus of the course is fiction from the colonial period, but we will also examine other modes of representation, such as travel writing, journalism, film, architecture, photography, and ethnography. Course readings will include some theoretical materials that introduce the fundamental terms of postcolonial studies.

ENGL 3853 credits
Language and Action: A Survey of Contemporary Rhetoric
Prerequisite(s): 45 credits of university-transfer courses including a first-year Communications or English course
Students will investigate major schools of contemporary rhetorical theory in an effort to understand the paradigms governing language use in contemporary social and linguistic environments. Rhetoric always includes study of the ways language serves as a call to action; in this course, the emphasis will be on the ways language acts -- in itself, on the user, and on the discourse community.
This course is offered as both CMNS 385 and ENGL 385. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 4904 credits
Directed Studies in English
Prerequisite(s): Permission to enter requires 45 credits in English and written contract between student and instructor, signed by student, instructor and department head
This independent study course is designed for upper-level students who wish to pursue in-depth study of an author, genre, period, or topic not otherwise offered.

ENGL 4914 credits
Honours Directed Reading
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Honours program as outlined in the calendar; completion of all lower-level course requirements for the English major, and a minimum of 24 upper-level requirements for major, and permission of an instructor and as outlined by the department
Honours Directed Reading is the first of two courses specific to the Honours program: A reading course, and a course devoted to the writing of an extended research essay. Honours Directed Reading is therefore intended to prepare students to write the research paper. The course will consist of instruction in research techniques and intensive reading in an area of interest to be defined by agreement between students and instructors.

ENGL 4924 credits
Honours Directed Essay
Prerequisite(s): Acceptance to Honours program as outlined in the calendar; completion of all lower-level course requirements for the English major, and a minimum of 24 upper-level requirements for major, and permission of an instructor and as outlined by the department
Honours Directed Essay is the second of two courses specific to the Honours program. Preceded by Honours Directed Reading, the Honours Essay course will be devoted to the writing of an extended research paper. This essay is to be the graduating project for the student's BA Honours degree in English, and should display excellent writing ability, knowledge of scholarly conventions, and thorough familiarity with the student's chosen topic.

Last updated: March 31, 2007Top


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