Search the calendar
 
 
   ARCHIVE: 2007/08 Academic Calendar
 
 HOME
 
 
 

History

English Language Requirements
Beginning Fall, 2007 students registering in post-secondary level courses (numbered 100 to 499) will be required to meet the English language entrance proficiency requirements. Students in ESL or the University Foundations programs can register in those courses identified in the University Foundations program with lower levels of language proficiency.

HIST 1013 credits
Canada: Prelude to Confederation
Prerequisite(s): None
Examines the development of British North America from the pre-contact period until the Confederation era. Topics include the British conquest, the fur trade, Anglophone/Francophone relations, the struggle for home rule, the rebellions of the 1830s, the economic transformation of central Canada, developments in the Pacific and Atlantic regions, and the origins and nature of confederation.
HIST 101 and HIST 102 are basic to advanced Canadian studies in the humanities and social sciences. Future teachers are also encouraged to enrol in Canadian history courses.

HIST 1023 credits
Canada 1867 to the Present
Prerequisite(s): None
Investigates the development of the Canadian nation from the time of Confederation until the recent past. Topics may include MacDonald's national economic strategy, conflict and consensus between English and French Canada, the Riel rebellions, rise of the grain trade and political protest in the prairie provinces, the Laurier years, the impact of industrialization on Canadian society, the conscription crises, the waning of British influence and the increasing American impact on Canadian affairs, the Mackenzie King era, the Quiet Revolution in Quebec, economic reform, and the constitutional debate.
HIST 101 and HIST 102 are basic to advanced Canadian studies in the humanities and social sciences.

HIST 1033 credits
Stó:lõ History
Prerequisite(s): None
This course examines key themes in the history of the Stó:lõ peoples, from the pre-contact era to the present. Themes will include the nature and structure of leadership, the role of traditional stories and myths in the making of Stó:lõ history, the Indian Act and its socioeconomic impact on Stó:lõ communities, the evolution and impact of educational policies, and First Nations education initiatives in the contemporary period. A special emphasis will be given to oral history as a way of accessing and documenting the community knowledge of its own history.
Participation in field trips scheduled outside of regular class times is required.

HIST 1053 credits
British Columbia: Pre-contact to the Present
Prerequisite(s): None
This course examines a selection of themes beginning prior to European contact in the late 18th century and concluding with recent social trends. These will include relations between newcomers and Aboriginal peoples, the staple export economy, fur trade, and gold rush society, B.C.’s confederation with Canada, reform movements (social gospel, prohibition, maternal feminism), the rise of organized labour, theory and practice of racism, and our political tradition.
Students planning careers in British Columbia's public schools are encouraged to enrol in this and other BC studies courses.

HIST 1083 credits
The Birth of Europe: Antiquity to the 14th Century
Prerequisite(s): None
This course examines the origins of the West in the ancient (Hebrew, Greek, and Roman) world, the collapse of this world, and the subsequent emergence, flowering, and crisis of Medieval Europe.

HIST 1093 credits
A History of the English, 1066-1688: The Emerging Nation-State
Prerequisite(s): None
An examination of the issues that combined to transform England from a medieval society into a comparatively strong, centralized nation-state. Against the background of succeeding monarchs the constitutional, economic, military, religious, colonial, and social themes that produced early modern England will be studied.
Your appreciation of English civilization will be enhanced by studying English literature (ENGL 201/202) either subsequent to or concurrent with HIST 109/110.

HIST 1103 credits
A History of Britain, 1688-1990: Great Power Status and Beyond
Prerequisite(s): None
An examination of the significant factors that account for the rise of modern Britain and her empire to the heights of the world's greatest power during the Victorian era and her subsequent decline in the 20th century to second-rank status. Within this economic, political, and social framework gender issues will be explored with a view to understanding the experiences of the masses, the middling classes, and the aristocracy.
Your appreciation of English civilization will be enhanced by studying English literature (ENGL 201/202) either subsequent to or concurrent with HIST 109/110.

HIST 1153 credits
Traditional East Asian Civilizations
Prerequisite(s): None
An introduction to the evolution of East Asian civilizations (with emphasis on China and Japan) from ancient times to the early 19th century. The focus is on social structure, cultural tradition, economic systems, and political institutions in pre-modern China and Japan.

HIST 2083 credits
European History, 1300-1789: The Rise and Decline of the Ancien Regime
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is a survey of Early Modern Europe from its birth in a crisis of the medieval world to the eve of the French Revolution. Themes examined include: the Renaissance and Reformation, rise of the sovereign state, European expansion and the emergence of a capitalist economy, the Scientific Revolution, popular culture, absolute monarchy, and the Enlightenment.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 201 may not take HIST 208 for further credit.

HIST 2093 credits
European History, 1789-1914: The Revolutionary Age
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is a survey of the impact of the French and Industrial Revolutions on 19th-century European society and culture. Themes examined include conservatism, liberalism, socialism, nationalism, romanticism, imperialism and world war, racism, the consumer revolution, the creation of mass society and mass culture, modernism, and feminism.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 202 may not take HIST 209 for further credit.

HIST 2103 credits
European History Since 1914
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will examine the decline of Europe from its dominant position in 1914 to its destruction in two world wars, and its political and economic reconstruction during and after the Cold War. Themes examined include conservatism, liberalism, socialism, nationalism, revolution, imperialism, racism, totalitarianism and world war, cold war, the consumer society and counter culture, and feminism.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 111 may not take HIST 210 for further credit.

HIST 2203 credits
Seeing Canada's History
Prerequisite(s): None. HIST 101 and HIST 102 or AH 214 recommended
This course will examine the Canadian past from pre-contact to the present through the examination of visual sources which are non-conventional for historians. These rich and varied sources, ranging from paintings to furnishings, tell their own, unique story of technological change, the significance of images as historical evidence, and an increasingly visual culture.

HIST 2263 credits
History of Native-Newcomer Relations in Canada
Prerequisite(s): None
This course provides a survey of the long relationship between the First Nations of Canada and the Newcomers who would come to live amongst them. The course begins with an assessment of Aboriginal Canada and Europe in the 15th century, on the eve of contact. It then examines the contact process and how this flourished into the extensive and diverse relations that emerged over the subsequent five centuries. Proceeding in roughly chronological fashion, students explore a range of topics including the fur trade, missionary activity, warfare and alliances, the development of government Indian policies, treaties, assimilation and indigenous resistance, cultural-political revival, and the legal and constitutional framework of contemporary relations. (Students who have taken HIST 326 cannot not take HIST 226 for further credit.)

HIST 2353 credits
Late Imperial and Modern China
Prerequisite(s): None
A survey of the last 400 years of Chinese history. The course is divided into the Late Imperial, Republican and People's Republic eras and examines the key social, political, and intellectual issues of each. The truly revolutionary changes that have taken place in Chinese society will be examined in the light of traditional institutions, internal forces of change, and shifting international influences.

HIST 2363 credits
Japanese History since 1600
Prerequisite(s): None
A survey of the last 400 years of Japanese history. The course is divided into the Late Traditional, Meiji, Prewar, and Postwar eras and examines the key social, political and intellectual issues of each. The evolution of Japanese society to today's position of influence and affluence is examined through the lens of internal forces of change and international complexities.

HIST 2413 credits
History of the United States to 1865
Prerequisite(s): None
A survey of the major developments in American history and historiography from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War. Attention will be given to social, economic, and political institutions, and to the lives of ordinary people.

HIST 2423 credits
History of the United States since 1865
Prerequisite(s): None
An examination of the struggles to extend the promises of American democracy to all citizens in a rapidly changing political economy, from the end of the Civil War to the present. Topics include industrialization, role of the state, foreign policy, racism, poverty, changing gender roles, religion, and more.

HIST 2433 credits
American Foreign Relations in the 20th Century
Prerequisite(s): None
This course examines the basic characteristics of American foreign policy in the 20th Century, the interactions of domestic factors with the wider world, the origins of America’s expansionism and rise to superpower status, specific objectives of America’s interventions abroad such as the world wars and Vietnam, America’s confrontation with the Soviet Union and the continuous debate about America’s special purpose in international relations.

HIST 2613 credits
Latin American History: The Colonial Experience
Prerequisite(s): None
This course surveys the history of Latin America, from the time of the great pre-Columbian city-states and empires (Mayan, Aztec and Inca), through the colonial era, to the emergence of independent nations in the early nineteenth century. Throughout, the course focuses on how the interaction between Native Americans, Spaniards, Portuguese and people of African descent created distinct societies in the "New World."

HIST 2623 credits
Latin American History: The National Experience
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is a survey of some of the principal themes in Latin American history from the time of independence to the present. Topics will include Latin America's place in the international economy, social and class relations, populism, military regimes, twentieth century revolutions, and the role of the United States in the region.

HIST 2643 credits
History of India: Akbar to Independence
Prerequisite(s): None
The Indian subcontinent comprises a vast geographic area embracing a startlingly complex and ancient array of cultures. The first objective of History 264 is to provide an introduction to the region with reference to the main themes that shaped its evolution from the Mughal Empire to independence. The course will begin by studying the historiography of South Asia in both the imperial and post-imperial eras. The Mughal Empire, the Company Raj and imperial rule will be explored with reference to Indian society. The impact of the Rebellion and rise of nationalism leading to independence will be studied. Finally, History 264 will study the impact of India on Britain and the Indian diaspora on the world. The second objective of the course is to explore the craft of historical research, analysis and writing.

HIST 2653 credits
India and the Indo-Pacific World
Prerequisite(s): None
Students of modern Indian history often focus on the internal development of the Subcontinent and the relationship between India and European imperialism. This course will examine the relationship between South Asia and the peoples of the Indo-Pacific world from the arrival of Islam to recent times. It will explore the influence of South Asian civilization on the economic and cultural development of the many societies bordering on the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Rim. It will also examine the impact of those societies on the South Asian economic and cultural world.

HIST 3004 credits
The Philosophy and Methodologies of History: ‘Learning’ and ‘Doing’ History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Recommended for History majors and extended minors.
This course has two major objectives: 1) to introduce you to the various philosophies and methodologies of history; and 2) to allow you to experience the 'doing' or 'making' of history, by examining the nature of historical evidence, and by applying what you have learned about philosophy, evidence, and historiography to selected methodological problems.

HIST 3014 credits
Studies in Applied History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits.
This course introduces students to public history, which concerns itself with the applications of history outside academia. Students are given a chance to examine the conceptual issues around historical representation outside the classroom, and they will critically assess a range of historical sites, including museums and historical re-creations, as well as popular history in print, film, and television histories, on the Internet, and as taught in the school system. (Students who have completed the former 301a/b can not take HIST 301 for additional or replacement credit.)

HIST 3084 credits
European Culture and Ideas, 1400-1789
Prerequisite(s): HIST 208 (formerly HIST 201) and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course examines selected themes in the cultural and intellectual history of Early Modern Europe and asks how and why Europeans thought the things they did in the years between 1400 and 1789. Themes may include popular culture, the witch craze, the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment.

HIST 3104 credits
Women and the Family in Western Europe, 1700-1930
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. HIST 110 and 209 (formerly HIST 202) are strongly recommended
This course is an introduction to the history of women and the family in Western Europe between 1700 and 1930 and related historiographical controversies and methodological problems. The central theme is the relationship between women's life cycles and those of their families. The British and French experience will be compared with an emphasis on the former.

HIST 3134 credits
War and Society in the Ancient and Medieval West
Prerequisite(s): HIST 108 or HIST 208 (formerly HIST 201) and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course examines the origins of warfare and its development in the ancient and medieval west. Closely linked to civilization itself, war emerged as one of the principal motives of collective effort; the reciprocal relationship between war and society was clear. This course will have a chronological structure interspersed with thematically focused consideration of historiographical debates. Technical and tactical innovations will be considered as they pertain to land and sea warfare, but particular emphasis will be placed on the manner in which war was shaped by the social, cultural, and political context in which it was conducted.

HIST 3144 credits
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Prerequisite(s): One of HIST 109, HIST 110, or HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202); and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course will examine the forces that shaped the emergence, development and collapse of the British Empire from the 17th to the 20th century. The impact of the empire on British economy and society as well as its impact on its colonial subjects will be considered. Issues such as race, gender and class in the context of constantly changing metropolitan and imperial cultural structures will receive special consideration.

HIST 3154 credits
War and Society in the Western World
Prerequisite(s): One of HIST 208 (formerly 201), HIST 209 (formerly 202), HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111), or the previously offered HIST 112; and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university level credits.
This course examines the interrelationship between western society and war from the Renaissance to the present. The influence of politics, economics, social stratification, and technology on the conduct of war will be emphasized along with a reciprocal analysis of the effects of war on society. This kind of military history represents a change from the traditional “great captains and campaigns” approach to a multifaceted analysis that puts warfare into the broader spectrum of human activity.

HIST 3174 credits
European Diplomacy and Crisis: 1919-1939
Prerequisite(s): HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111) and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course examines the international relations between European states from the end of the Great War to the beginning of the Second World War. This period witnessed the conflict between the illusionary hopes of the democratic victors of the Great War set against the revisionist ambitions of the dictators Mussolini, Stalin, Franco and Hitler. In a context of repeated economic crises, heightened social expectations and political discord, European statesmen pursued often divergent foreign policies that seemed to lead inescapably to war. When British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain raised his "piece of paper" and proclaimed a lasting peace had been established in September, 1938, it was the last rhetorical gasp of an illusion that the Great War could be the "war to end all wars".

HIST 3184 credits
History of Modern Germany
Prerequisite(s): One of HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202), HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111), or the formerly offered HIST 112; and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course explores the history of Modern Germany from the beginning of French occupation in the 1790s to the (re)unification of Germany in 1990. Topics addressed include the changing nature of German political culture, German state formation, social and cultural upheaval, war, genocide, reconstruction, the Cold War, and treatment of the Nazi legacy in East and West Germany from 1945 to1990.

HIST 3194 credits
France since 1789
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course will examine the political, social, economic, and intellectual development of France from the Revolution to the Fifth Republic. Themes explored include the revolutionary tradition, the Napoleonic myth, republican ideology, the labour movement, the status of women, mass politics and mass consumption, the French Left and communism, the French Right and fascism, collaboration and resistance, nationalism and imperialism, the family and sexuality, and the political significance of changing attitudes to crime, madness, and disease.

HIST 3204 credits
The Holocaust, 1933-1945
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202) or HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111), or the previously offered HIST 112.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111), or the previously offered HIST 112 and either six
additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.

This course examines a fundamental event: the Nazis' restructuring of Germany and Europe according to racial criteria that involved the relocation and decimation of entire populations. This involved a mosaic of victims, including as many Jews as the Nazis could identify. This premeditated crime required the efforts of an entire society, purportedly civilized, employing modern scientific, bureaucratic, industrial, and professional methods. This event continues to astound and resist comprehension, a problem which scholars have attempted to overcome lest it be forgotten, marginalized, or denied.

HIST 3214 credits
Canadian Military History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course will explore the military experience of a supposedly un-military country and people. Despite the mythology of Canada as a peaceful place, its history since Confederation has been scarred and transformed by conflict. The course will begin with the defensive challenges facing the new Dominion in 1867, continue through the World Wars and Korea, and close with the peace-keeping / peace making and combat missions of the Post-Cold War World. The approach to this subject will be multi-faceted, with students examining the perspective of the private soldier as well as the general, the home front as well as the battle front, and peace-time as well as war-time.

HIST 3224 credits
Quebec, 1867-1970: Industrial Development, Political Change
Prerequisite(s): HIST 102 and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course will give students a good knowledge of the important transitions experienced by four generations of Quebecers from Confederation to the FLQ Crisis. Participants in this course will study the evolution of Quebec from a rural society to an urban-industrial society, setting in motion changes that brought into question both traditional political structures and the ideas and cultural aspirations of the province's elites. Students who have taken HIST 396F cannot take this course for further credit.)

HIST 3234 credits
History of Education in Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course examines the major trends in historical writing on Canadian education and reviews the key developments in Canada's educational history from the early 19th century to the present. Themes include the emergence of the public school system in the 19th century, the politics of education before World War One, school experiences for students and teachers, progressive education ideologies, First Nations schooling, the institutional effects of gender and race/ethnicity, and curriculum change over time. An emphasis will be on education history in British Columbia.
This course is also offered as EDUC 323. Students cannot take EDUC 323 for further credit.

HIST 3244 credits
Canadian Culture since 1945
Prerequisite(s): HIST 102 and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits
This course will follow the development of Canadian society as it showed the effects of the culture of the Cold War, the culture of confrontation and radicalism in the Sixties, the super-sized culture of the 1970s and the neo-conservative culture of the late 20th century. Contemporary Canada has been shaped by the Baby Boom generation; Boomers' concerns continue to affect Canadian society in the current culture of ageism, nostalgia, self-help and spirituality.

HIST 3254 credits
Canadian Sport History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course examines the differing roles of sport in Canada from the time of New France to the late 20th century. Topics will include theoretical and historiographical trends in sport history; industrialization, state formation, and the rise of organized sport; the roots of professionalism and sport commerce; the struggle between amateurism and professional sports; gender identities and conflict in sport; and the business of sport, sport media, and state involvement after 1945.

HIST 3274 credits
Settler-Indigenous Relations in New Zealand and Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits
This course will examine the relationships between the Indigenous peoples of New Zealand and Canada, and the Newcomers who came to live among them. Students will compare and contrast the experiences of Maori and First Nations, as well as those of the explorers, traders, missionaries, soldiers and settlers on the other side of the exchange. The comparative framework will highlight how the global context of British and European colonial patterns interacted with local circumstances to shape Native-Newcomer relations in each region. The course will cover the period from contact through the end of the twentieth century and will deal with issues like the impact of disease, warfare, trade and resource exploitation, settler ideology, land rights and usage, treaties, legislation and government policy, indigenous resistance, accommodation, and politicization.

HIST 3294 credits
Canadian Family History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course is a detailed examination of the changing Canadian family, from the 18th century to the present.

HIST 3304 credits
Politics and Personalities in Canadian History
Prerequisite(s): HIST 102 and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course will survey the key political and constitutional developments in Canadian history from 1763 to the present, and the key actors involved. It will examine Canada's evolution as a British colony, the advent of self-government, the negotiation of Confederation, the development and evolution of institutions in Canadian political life, important events and characters in federal and provincial politics, international relations, and more recent constitutional challenges.
Note: Students with credit for HIST 396D may not take HIST 330 for further credit.

HIST 3404 credits
Colonial America and the Early Republic to 1815
Prerequisite(s): HIST 241 and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course will explore the forces shaping the establishment of the American colonies, their development as a distinct people within the British empire, and the challenges facing them as an independent republic. It will seek to explain colonial America and the early republic from a trans-Atlantic perspective. Topics will include: Europe and the "imagined landscape" of the "New World", settlers and indigenous peoples, community formation, Europe, Africa and America, communication and the creation of an Atlantic culture, Empire and constitution, wars and revolution, establishing the republic, slavery, gender and family, frontier and the American identity, and the War of 1812.

HIST 3574 credits
History of Inter-American Relations: Latin America, the United States, and Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course takes a critical look at the complex, often contentious, and evolving relationship between Latin America, the United States, and Canada, from the early nineteenth century through to the present. Topics may include changes in foreign policy towards the region; forms of political and military intervention; human rights; trade, investment, and globalization; development assistance; drug policy; environmental concerns; cultural perceptions and influences; and the importance of Latin American communities north of the Mexican border.

HIST 3584 credits
African Slavery in the Americas
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course explores the development of the Atlantic slave trade and the history of African slavery in the Americas. It takes a broad view, examining the institution of slavery over four centuries, while considering the diverse experiences of slaves in the hemisphere's distinct colonies and early nation-states. Topics may include the impact of slavery on African polities, the formation of Afro-American societies and cultures, the perspectives of both slaves and slave owners, the genesis of new identities and ideologies regarding race, class, and gender, the mechanisms used to keep slaves under control and the forms of resistance they practiced, and the struggle to achieve personal freedom and abolition.

HIST 3594 credits
Problems in Latin American Regional History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
Advanced study of selected problems in Latin American history. Topics will have a regional or national focus, and may also be restricted to a specific period. Examples include the Andes under Inca and Spanish rule, Brazil from empire to republic, Mexico since the revolution of 1910, or military dictatorship in the Southern Cone during the late 20th century.

HIST 3644 credits
Indian Social History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course will examine the forces shaping the emergence of modern Indian society from the 17th century to the 1980s. Issues such as imperialism, nationalism, urbanization, and industrialization will be explored with reference to their impact on ethnicity, caste, class, and gender in Indian society to recent times.

HIST 3704 credits
The American Civil Rights Movement
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
This course examines the African-Americans' struggle for racial justice, from the 1930s to the 1960s, and recent historiographical debates in the field. Topics will include the use of nonviolence as a strategy for social change; armed resistance and black nationalism; the place of religion in the struggle for, and resistance to, integration; gender dynamics and other tensions within the movement; the role of white allies and the federal government; the impact of the Cold War on civil rights debates; and northern racism. Special attention will be paid to popular and academic representations of the movement.

HIST 3754 credits
The United States since 1945
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include HIST 242 or 243; or HIST 370 or HIST 380. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 242 or HIST 243 and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 university-level credits.
This course will examine the American experience abroad and at home since World War II. It will explore, among other themes, America’s rise to superpower status and the role that it played in international affairs from the Cold War to the Persian Gulf wars; the domestic impact of foreign policy, including anti-communism and more recent violations of civil liberty; the economic achievements, limitations, and cultural manifestations of the postwar “Affluent Society”; the shaping of a postwar liberal “consensus” and its critics; and the rise of a powerful conservative majority since the mid-1960s.

HIST 3814 credits
Social History of Late Imperial China
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 115 or HIST 235 and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course looks at changes in Chinese society and culture during the late imperial period. Topics include demographic change; social stratification; family structures; gender relations; elite and popular cultures; education and literacy; race and ethnicity; Chinese modernity; the emergence of capitalism in China. (Students who took HIST 399 or HIST 399C between Fall 2001 and Fall 2003 may not take HIST 381 for further credit).

HIST 3854 credits
Imperialism and Colonialism in Modern Asia
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: One of HIST 115, HIST 235 or HIST 236; and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course will examine the process of empire building in Asia by the major imperial powers since the early nineteenth century. The impact of the various imperialist and colonial activities in different parts of Asia will also be studied.

HIST 3904 credits
European Socialism from the First to the Third International
Prerequisite(s): HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202) or HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111) and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
This course examines the evolution of socialist thought and practice in Europe from the Industrial and French Revolution to the eve of World War Two, from Marx to Lukacs and Gramsci. Topics include the variety of labour movements and their relation to socialist parties; the impact on socialism of World War I, the Bolshevik Revolution, feminism, and fascism; the division of socialism between social democracy and communism and between Soviet and Western Marxism; and Lenin, Trotsky, and Luxemburg.

HIST 3964 credits
Topics in North American History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: One of HIST 101, HIST 102 or HIST 220; and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
The topics will be in the field of North American history, and will vary with the instructor. Typically this course will be offered by a visiting scholar.
Different topics will be identified by adding a letter to the course numbers, e.g., 396a, 396b.

HIST 3974 credits
Topics in European History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history . Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: One of HIST 208 (formerly HIST 201), HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202), HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111), or the previously offered HIST 112; and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
The topics will be in the field of European history, and will vary with the instructor. Typically this course will be offered by a visiting scholar.
Different topics will be identified by adding a letter to the course numbers, e.g., 397a, 397b.

HIST 3984 credits
Topics in Asian History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 115 or 235 and either six additional credits of lower-level history or 42 additional university-level credits.
The topics will be in the field of Asian history, and will vary with the instructor. Typically this course will be offered by a visiting scholar.
Different topics will be identified by adding a letter to the course numbers, e.g., 398a, 398b.

HIST 3994 credits
Special Topics in History I
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history or 45 university-level credits. Familiarity with the basic skills of historical inquiry is expected.
The topics will vary with the instructor, but will be limited to those which our library resources can support and those which lie outside the subject areas currently offered by our faculty (e.g. topics in Early Modern European History or East/Central/Southern European History).

HIST 4014 credits
Practicum in History
Prerequisite(s): HIST 301 and department permission
This course is designed to integrate applied experience and training into students’ academic studies in history. Through a semester-long practicum, students participate in supervised, unpaid work experience with a local employer or institution to apply or build upon their historical skills and open up employment opportunities through work contracts. (Students who have completed the former HIST 301a/b can not take HIST 401 for additional or replacement credit.) Note: This course is governed by an early application process with an early September deadline.

HIST 4084 credits
Liberty and Authority in 19th Century Thought
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, with one of HIST 208 (formerly HIST 201), HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202), HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111), or the previously offered HIST 112. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: Nine credits of lower-level history and four credits of 300-level history. HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202) or HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111) are recommended.
This course will examine the new ideologies and "isms" of the nineteenth century (liberalism, conservatism, socialism, romanticism, feminism, and modernism) as attempts to make sense of the radically changed world produced by the French and Industrial Revolutions. It will examine how this world produced new conceptions of the relationship between liberty and authority, the individual and the community, men and women, the present and the past. (Seminar)

HIST 4104 credits
The Industrialization of European Society
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. HIST 109, HIST 110, HIST 208 (formerly HIST 201) and HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202) are strongly recommended.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
Nine credits of lower-level history and four credits of 300-level history. HIST 110, HIST 208 (formerly HIST 201) and HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202) are recommended.
This course will present an examination of the economic origins of modern European society from 1700 to 1914. It will focus on a comparative study of Britain-the industrial pioneer-and the varied experiences of other nation-states as industrialization spread across continental Europe. The intellectual dimension and social consequences of industrialization will also be studied. (Seminar)

HIST 4154 credits
Victorian Britain
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. HIST 109 and 110 are strongly recommended.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
Nine credits of lower-level history and four credits of 300-level history. HIST 109 and HIST 110 are recommended.
Prompted by an industrial revolution and a population boom, nineteenth century Britain embarked upon comparatively rapid and persistent change at all levels of society; in short, upon modern times. The goal of the course is to examine confrontations involving the forces for change and those for continuity over important economic, political, social and intellectual issues with a view to understanding the nature of Victorian society (1830-1906). Within this context the following themes will be explored: the meaning of the "Industrial Revolution" and its social impact, the making of a class society, constitutional reform, the role of government in a laissez-faire era, pressure group politics, the illiberal possibilities in liberal ideology, the Irish question, gender relations in Victorian society, the rise of organized labour and late nineteenth century economic decline.

HIST 4184 credits
The Great War, 1914-1918
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202) or HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111); or nine credits of lower-level history and HIST 315. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111), six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course examines the origins and course of the Great War and the peace treaties that concluded the conflict. This course offers an opportunity to study the diplomatic, military, economic, and social causes of the war. It also follows the course of the war, both on the Western and Eastern fronts and those fronts opened all around the world on land, sea, and in the air. Most importantly, students will be exposed to the historical debates and a variety of sources used to understand the events. Finally, the Great War will be positioned in a context that emphasizes its crucial role in ending the 19th century and in shaping events that led to and defined an even greater war, World War II. (Seminar)

HIST 4204 credits
World War II
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, and HIST 315 or HIST 320.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111) or the previously offered HIST 112, six additional credits of lower-level history, and HIST 315 or HIST 320.
This course addresses selected topics in World War II history such as the soldier's experience, the myth and reality of resistance, the development of weapons systems capable of destroying entire societies, the war against civilians, the decision to use atomic bombs, the judgment or misjudgment at Nuremberg and Tokyo, why the Allies won, and the politics of remembrance. (Seminar)

HIST 4244 credits
Modernism in Canada, 1900-1939
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include HIST 102. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 102, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
Canadians at the turn of the 20th century were acutely aware that their society was undergoing momentous intellectual and cultural changes. This course will trace the transformations that Canadians experienced as new ideas, new movements in
the arts, and new lifestyles accompanied Canada's journey from a traditional, rural society to a modern, urban one.

HIST 4254 credits
The Development of Quebec Nationalism
Prerequisite(s): HIST 101 or HIST 102, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course will give students an in-depth understanding of the origins, characteristics, evolution and persistence of Nationalism in French Canada. Participants in this course will study the history of an ideology that has undergone many changes, and has been associated, especially in Quebec, with times of turbulence and dissent. (Students who have taken HIST 499F may not take this course for further credit.)

HIST 4264 credits
Aboriginal Peoples and Warfare in Canada: Pre-contact to the Present
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 101 or HIST 102, six additional credits of lower-level history, and HIST 321.
This course will seek to trace the relationships between warfare and the Aboriginal peoples in what is now Canada. Students will explore not only the weaponry, tactics, and patterns of warfare as practiced by Aboriginal groups in different regions of the country, both prior to and after the arrival of Europeans, but also the societal context and cultural significance of warfare and warriors. The course will also cover the 20th century relationship between Aboriginal peoples and Canada's military establishment, including indigenous participation in the World Wars and Korea. (Seminar)

HIST 4284 credits
The Social and Economic History of Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history which must include one of HIST 101 or HIST 102.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 101 or HIST 102, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
Selected problems in Canadian social and economic history. (Seminar)

HIST 4304 credits
Canada and Migration
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 101 or HIST 102, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course will survey the history and historiography of some of the key migrant groups in Canada, consider major trends in immigration policy, and assess the impact of changing immigrant profiles. It will also address major themes and the key theoretical approaches to migration studies. Migration literature will supplement the historical readings. (Seminar)

HIST 4364 credits
History of British Columbia
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 105, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
Selected problems in the social, cultural, economic and political development of British Columbia. (Seminar)

HIST 4544 credits
Gender and Sexuality in U.S. History
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of HIST 241 or HIST 242. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 241 or HIST 242, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course will introduce students to major themes and new approaches in the history of gender and sexuality. We will examine the changing constructions of masculinity and femininity in the United States, from the colonial era to the late twentieth century. More specifically, we will look at how prescribed social and cultural norms have shaped definitions of acceptable behaviour in areas as diverse as politics, work, family and sexuality; how these norms have changed over time; and how men and women of different classes, races, ethnicity and sexual orientation have responded to these norms. (Seminar)

HIST 4564 credits
Citizenship in America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower level history, which must include one of HIST 241 or HIST 242 (required fall 2005). Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 242, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course examines the changing and contested definitions of citizenship in the United States from the late 18th century to the late 20th century. Through a chronological and thematic approach, we will examine how membership in the American political and civic community has been defined over the years. We will look at legal, political, economic and social definitions of citizenship, and pay special attention to the dynamics of exclusion based on race, ethnicity, economic status, religion, gender and sexual orientation. All these have fundamentally shaped the definition and exercise of one's rights and obligations as a citizen of the United States. (Seminar)

HIST 4574 credits
Sexuality and Gender in Latin America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of HIST 261 or HIST 262. Note: As of Fall 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 261 or HIST 262, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of upper-level history or LAS.
This course examines the history of sexuality and gender in Latin America from the colonial era to the present. Topics may include the historical and sociocultural construction of sexuality and gender, as well as the complex relationship between sex, gender, and power; patriarchy, honour, and authority; contested gender relations and the family; machismo and notions of masculinity and femininity; the nation-state's concern with gender, moral order, and the control of sexual behaviour; sexual identities and politics; and the intersection of gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity. (Seminar)
Students may not take HIST 459c for further credit.

HIST 4584 credits
History of Indigenous Peoples in Latin America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of HIST 261 or HIST 262. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 261 or HIST 262, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of upper-level history or LAS.
This course explores the history of indigenous peoples in Latin America through the in-depth study of a particular region (the Maya area, central Mexico, the Andes, or the Amazon), typically from the pre-European period to the present. Topics may include the political, economic, and sociocultural transformation of indigenous societies under colonial rule; the shifting, complex relationship between indigenous peoples and the state, considering questions of citizenship, ethnicity, class, and gender; national ideology and indigenismo; struggles over land, labour, and other resources; religious change; repression and rebellion; the impact of state-directed development policies; and the emergence of new identities. (Seminar)

HIST 4594 credits
Topics in the Political and Social History of Latin America
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of HIST 261 or HIST 262. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 261 or HIST 262, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of upper-level history or LAS.
Advanced study of selected topics in Latin American history. Topics will have a thematic or comparative focus, and may include contact and conquest, colonial identity, nationalism and independence, elite structures, agrarian revolution, populism, the military and society, and Latin American international relations. (Seminar)

HIST 4644 credits
India, the Punjab and Diaspora: A Study of Migration and Community Formation in Canada.
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. HIST 264 strongly recommended.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 264, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
The Punjab and adjacent regions of northern India have long been a major source of South Asian migration to Canada. History 464 seeks to understand the factors that encouraged the pre- and post- Independence diasporas by studying the history of northern India with special reference to the Punjab. It will explore the reasons that the Punjab developed special connections with Canada. The course will then focus on the process of community formation as South Asians sought to gain a foothold amongst an often hostile Anglo-Canadian society. History 464 shall explore the maturation of Indo-Canadian society and its integration into the broader Canadian cultural mosaic. Special attention will be paid to the Sikh community and its experience in British Columbia. (Seminar)

HIST 4654 credits
British India
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, HIST 264 or HIST 314 is recommended.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 264, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course will explore the rise of the British presence in India and the emergence of a distinct Anglo-Indian society from the 18th century to Indian independence. The impact of Anglo-British society on Britain as well as India will be considered. Issues such as imperialism, racism, gender, and class in the context of a hybrid colonial-metropolitan society will receive special consideration. (Seminar)

HIST 4844 credits
Gender History in Canada
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 101 or HIST 102, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course will review major interpretive issues in the history of gender in Canada. Possible topics include gender and work; the gendering of settlement; race, class, and gender; sex and sexuality; and the history of masculinity. (Seminar)

HIST 4854 credits
La Belle Époque: Sex, Psyche, and Society
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, which must include one of HIST 110, HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202), or HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111).
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 209 (formerly HIST 202) or HIST 210 (formerly HIST 111), six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
The years 1890-1914 were a period of cultural revolution associated with modernism in the arts, Freudian psychoanalysis, irrationalist philosophy, and the birth of new disciplines: sociology, sexology, and crowd psychology. The revolutionary changes in painting, the novel, and social and political thought, will be related to the new phenomena of mass consumption, monopoly capitalism, the new imperialism, the "new woman," mass politics, and dramatic developments in technology and science. (Seminar)

HIST 4864 credits
Problems in the Chinese Communist Revolution
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: HIST 235, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course will examine the origins and development of the Chinese Communist revolution from the May Fourth period to the founding of the People's Republic of China. With emphasis on the social and ideological aspects, the course will investigate the relationship between party leadership and mass participation in the development of a revolutionary movement in China before 1949. (Seminar.)

HIST 4874 credits
Society and Politics in China since 1949
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history.
Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following:
HIST 235, six additional credits of lower-level history, and four credits of 300-level history.
This course studies the major social and political changes in China under Communism since 1949 with emphasis on the interplay between ideology and policy. It also analyses the relationship between China's domestic development and external policy.

HIST 4894 credits
Directed Studies in History -- Projects
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, and written consent of the supervising faculty member. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: Nine credits of lower-level history, four credits of 300-level history, and written consent of the super faculty member.
Designed for students who wish to examine in greater depth a particular historical problem. It will be offered either as an individual reading course or as small seminars, depending upon student and faculty interest. Admission only by consent of the instructor.

HIST 4904 credits
Directed Studies in History -- Readings
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history, and written consent of the supervising faculty member. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: Nine credits of lower-level history, four credits of 300-level history, and written consent of supervising faculty member.
Designed for students who wish to examine in greater depth a particular historical problem. It will be offered either as an individual reading course or as small seminars, depending upon student and faculty interest. Admission only by consent of instructor.

HIST 4994 credits
Special Topics in History II
Prerequisite(s): Nine credits of lower-level history. Note: As of September 2008 the prerequisites will change to the following: Nine credits of lower-level history and four credits of 300-level history.
The topics will vary with the instructor, but will be limited to those which our library resources can support and those which lie outside the subject areas currently offered by our faculty (e.g., topics in Early Modern European History or East/Central/Southern European History).

Last updated: March 31, 2007Top


Calendar Home | Program Index | Course Descriptions | Schedule of Events | UCFV Home | UCFV A-Z | Apply Now | Contact Us 

Copyright © University College of the Fraser Valley (UCFV), 33844 King Road, Abbotsford, BC, Canada, V2S 7M8