Search the calendar
 
 
   ARCHIVE: 2007/08 Academic Calendar
 
 HOME
 
 
 

Psychology
Note on prerequisites: Unless stated otherwise, the minimum grade acceptable in all course prerequisites is a C-.

English Language Requirements
Beginning Fall, 2007 students registering in post-secondary level courses (numbered 100 to 499) will be required to meet the English language entrance proficiency requirements. Students in ESL or the University Foundations programs can register in those courses identified in the University Foundations program with lower levels of language proficiency.

PSYC 1013 credits
Introduction to Psychology I
Prerequisite(s): CPT score of 48 or higher OR ENGL 099 with a C or higher OR ENGL 081 or 091 with a C+ or higher OR success in a previous university-transfer English course OR English 12 with a B or higher
This course introduces students to the field of psychology and its research methods, and surveys the basic perspectives of psychology with respect to learning, memory, thought, child development, sensation and perception, and physiology.

PSYC 1023 credits
Introduction to Psychology II
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101
This course is a continuation of PSYC 101. The content areas of emotion, motivation, personality, social influence, psychological disorders, and psychological testing are covered.

PSYC 1103 credits
Statistical Analysis in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): MATH 11 or equivalent
This course covers basic techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications to psychological research. Methods of graphing, measures of central tendency, dispersion, relationships, and various parametric and distribution-free tests are included.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both PSYC 110 and PSYC 201 (previously offered)

PSYC 2003 credits
Topics and Issues in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101
This course is designed for non-Psychology major students who would like to take an elective in Psychology. The topics covered in the course may vary from year to year depending on the instructor. Check with the Psychology Department for more information.

PSYC 200J3 credits
Explaining the Brain
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101
This course is designed for the non-Psychology major student who would like to take an elective in Psychology. The topics covered in the course may vary from year to year depending on the instructor. Check with the Psychology department for more information.

PSYC 2024 credits
Research Methods in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102
Pre- or corequisite(s): PSYC 110 or MATH 104 or MATH 106
This course will examine the following topics: ethics in research; scientific writing for APA; experimental, descriptive, quasi-experimental, and developmental research designs; an introduction to measurement in Psychology; descriptive and inferential statistics; and generalization and interpretation of research results. Students will be required to conduct and write up one piece of original research on a psychological topic.

PSYC 2213 credits
Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102
This course surveys several important sub-areas of cognitive psychology including pattern recognition, attention, memory, category formation, imagery, problem solving, expertise and creativity, language, and decision making. Students will be introduced to many classic issues and landmark experiments in these areas, and will explore the research literature in specific topics of their choice.

PSYC 2413 credits
Psychological Disorders
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102
This course surveys basic theory and research in abnormal psychology. Behavioural, cognitive, psychoanalytic, biopsychological, and humanistic perspectives are used to explore various clinical disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, sociopathy, and others. Assessment and treatment of disorders are also included.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both PSYC 241 and PSYC 341 (previously offered).

PSYC 2503 credits
Introduction to Developmental Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102
This course introduces students to the study of human development across the lifespan. The course will cover the major theories of human development and changes that occur during the lifespan in the areas of cognitive, perceptual, social, and emotional development.

PSYC 2803 credits
Biological Bases of Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102
This course is an introduction to the relationship between brain and behaviour. Topics include an overview of the nervous system and the neural basis of complex behaviours.

PSYC 3013 credits
Intermediate Research Methods and Data Analysis in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 202; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course is a continuation of the second-year research methods course. It will provide extensions of basic theory and methods of research design and data analysis. Discussion will include the analysis of substantive problems, the choice of appropriate research designs and special problems that arise in the analysis of psychological data.

PSYC 3023 credits
Learning
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 202 or PSYC 221; or PSYC 210 and 220
In this course, students will study prominent learning processes including habituation, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, modelling, concept formation, and analogical inference. Learning issues related to discrimination, generalization, biological constraints on learning, and reinforcement will be discussed in the context of human and animal learning. Students will be encouraged to apply the content of this course to the general problem of designing human educational learning programs.

PSYC 3033 credits
Perception
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 202 , PSYC 221 or PSYC 280; or PSYC 210 and PSYC 220
This course explores the question of how we create an internal representation of the external world from the information provided by our sensory systems. Specific topics covered include reading, speech, perception, recognition of faces and facial expressions, and perception of art and music.

PSYC 3053 credits
The Psychology of Gender
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102, and one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course will look at the research on gender issues in a variety of subfields of psychology, including developmental, cognitive, abnormal, social, personality, psycholinguistics, and biopsychology. The course is designed for the senior student with an interest in gender issues, but not necessarily a broad base in psychology.

PSYC 3063 credits
Psychological Assessment
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102; one of PSYC 110 or MATH 104 or MATH 106; one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210, and PSYC 220
Provides an introduction to the purpose, scope, and mechanics of psychological testing and assessment. Topics include theoretical issues in assessment, methodology of administering tests, statistics, assessment for specific populations, and an overview of currently used assessment instruments.

PSYC 3253 credits
Memory
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 202 or PSYC 221; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course introduces students to the major areas of memory research. Topics studied include sensory, short-term, working, and semantic memory, as well as encoding strategies, retrieval cues, amnesia, state dependent learning, and mnemonics.

PSYC 3263 credits
Psychology of Consciousness
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 221; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course is a systematic study of consciousness from both theoretical and applied points of view in Psychology. Topics include the role of consciousness in the history of Psychology; research on states of consciousness (e.g., dreaming, hypnosis, meditation, fantasy); research and theory on the relationship between brain and consciousness; and therapeutic use of cultivated states of consciousness.

PSYC 3433 credits
Psychology of Health
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102, and one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course presents a blend of basic theory and research along with clinical perspectives and interventions in Health Psychology. An expanded biopsychosocial systems perspective is presented and used to study psychological factors in health and illness. Topics include models and psychophysiological mechanisms of stress; applicable research designs; personality and health; psychological treatments for stress related disorders; lifestyle and health behaviours; and social and societal factors in health and health care.

PSYC 3513 credits
Child Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 250, and one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course considers the psychological aspects of human development from conception through to adolescence. It covers the changes in the areas of physical, perceptual, language, emotional, social, and cognitive development.

PSYC 3553 credits
Adolescent Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 250, one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and PSYC 220
This course considers the psychological aspects of human development during the period of adolescence. Changes in the areas of physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development will be covered.

PSYC 3563 credits
Developmental Psychopathology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 202, PSYC 241 and PSYC 351
This course provides an introduction to the field of developmental psychopathology. The course takes the position that abnormal development is best viewed from its relation to normal development. As such the course material integrates developmental theory, theoretical perspectives on the origins and treatments of disordered behaviors in childhood, and relevant research findings in these areas. Further, it is also assumed that the behavior disorders of children are best understood within the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which they occur. Topics will include problems such as conduct, attentions, anxiety, mood, and autistic disorders.
Note: Students with credit for PSYC 491E cannot take PSYC 356 for further credit.

PSYC 3573 credits
Adulthood and Aging
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 250, one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and PSYC 220
This course considers human development from young adulthood to old age. Topics include theories of adult development and aging, environmental and biological factors in aging, and the effects of aging on sensation, perception, learning, cognition, personality, psychopathology, and social relations.

PSYC 3603 credits
Social Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102, one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and PSYC 220
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a broad overview of the field of Social Psychology. The course focuses on social psychological theory and findings. Topics may include how individuals view the social world, how individuals make inferences about others, how attitudes are formed and changed, and social relations.
Note: Credits cannot be obtained for both PSYC 360 and PSYC 260 (previously offered).

PSYC 3673 credits
Psychology of Language
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102, and one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and 220
Language is intrinsically interesting, but also particularly relevant to psychologists. Experiments rely upon language to convey instructions and collect data, while therapeutic interventions rely on communication between psychologist and client. Topics covered in this course will be drawn from many areas of Psychology as well as other disciplines in an attempt to understand the complex nature of human language. Specific topics include linguistics theories, animal language, sign language, neural mechanisms of language, language production and comprehension, multilingualism and social context of language.

PSYC 3683 credits
Political Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102
This course undertakes a brief survey of the interdisciplinary field of political psychology. Because politics is an interactive process that involves both the people whom we usually think of as political leaders and the "little people" who do not do much more than vote, analysis of both leaders and voters (or other low-level political actors) will be undertaken. Some of the topics examined are chimpanzee politics, game theory, personality processes, cognition and decision-making, small group processes, emotion, social identity, political legitimacy, race relations, nationalism, terrorism, and social capital.
Note: Students with credit for PSYC 491F cannot take PSYC 368 for further credit.

PSYC 3703 credits
Introduction to Personality Theory
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102, and one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course introduces students to the work of prominent personality theorists from Sigmund Freud to modern theorists. The focus of study will progress from Freud to Carl Jung, Henry Murray, Eric Erikson, social learning theorists, and humanists.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both PSYC 370 and PSYC 270 (previously offered).

PSYC 3753 credits
Fundamentals of Clinical Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 241, and one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course examines both professional issues and selected topics in the discipline of Clinical Psychology. Educational and training issues and requirements, history of the field, career options, and work issues will be studied. Professional ethical guidelines, ethical decision making, and applications will be introduced, as will Canadian issues. Depending on the instructor, the course will either survey assessment, interventions and research in Clinical Psychology, or focus on a specific topic, such as interventions, the therapeutic relationship, the history of psychotherapy, or comparative cultural systems of intervention.

PSYC 3803 credits
Human Neuropsychology
(formerly PSYC 491A)
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 280; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course is an examination of both clinical and experimental neuropsychology, which is based on case studies of patients with damage to the nervous system. Topics include the assessment of cognitive and behavioural functions such as memory, language, spatial skills; the nature of neurodegenerative diseases and other forms of neuropathology (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, multi-infarct dementia); the treatment of brain pathology (still almost impossible, but a rapidly growing research area); and the application of information gained through the study of patients to the understanding of non-pathological (that is, ‘normal’) brains.

PSYC 3833 credits
Drugs and Behaviour
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 280, and one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and 220
This course covers the basics of psychopharmacology, with an emphasis on understanding neural communication and how this is related to human behaviour. Topics include how neurotransmitters work, how drugs affect neurotransmitters, the relationship between neurotransmitters and behaviour, hormones and behaviour, neurochemical deficits in neurodegenerative disease and psychopathy, and theories of addiction.

PSYC 3853 credits
Evolutionary Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102, and one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and PSYC 220
This course incorporates data from the life and social sciences with theory and research from diverse areas psychology (e.g., cognitive, social, physiological and personality). The evolutionary givens of survival and reproduction are examined, starting with the core assumptions informing evolutionary and typical research methods. Also examined are gender differences/similarities in mate selection/retention, parenting, kinship, cooperative alliances, aggression, status and inter-gender conflict.
Note: Students with credit for PSYC 200E cannot take PSYC 385 for further credit.

PSYC 3863 credits
Social Psychology of Groups
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101, PSYC 102, one of PSYC 202, CRIM 220, KPE 400, SCMS 255; or PSYC 210 and PSYC 220
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a broad overview of the social psychology of groups. The course focuses on social psychological theory, methodology, and findings. Topics will include group cohesion and development, power, leadership, and performance.

PSYC 4083 credits
History of Psychology
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 202; or PSYC 210 and 220, 15 credits of upper-level psychology
This course concentrates on the past 125 years of development in the field of Psychology. The major schools and systems of thought will be presented and the outstanding figures within each school or system will be described. Links between psychological systems of thought and broader intellectual and social currents will be examined.

PSYC 4913 credits
Selected Topics in Psychology
Prerequisite(s): Instructor's permission
This seminar course critically reviews theory, methods, and research results in s selected sub-field of Psychology. Students should check with the Psychology Department to determine the content area and prerequisites for a particular semester.

PSYC 493A3 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Department's permission
This is an independent reading and research in topics course, selected in consultation with a supervising instructor.
Note: Students who have already completed a directed studies course in Psychology should register under PSYC 493B. Students cannot register in either PSYC 493A or PSYC 493B without first filling out a contract with the instructor.

PSYC 493B3 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Department's permission, major in Psychology
This is an independent reading and research in topics course, selected in consultation with a supervising instructor. This course is designed for students who wish to engage in directed studies further to those completed in PSYC 493A.
Note: Students cannot register in either PSYC 493A or PSYC 493B without first filling out a contract with the instructor.

PSYC 4955 credits
Directed Studies
Prerequisite(s): Psychology major, 90 credits, permission of instructor and department
This is an independent research or field experience course, selected in consultation with a supervising instructor and the Psychology Department.

Last updated: March 31, 2007Top


Calendar Home | Program Index | Course Descriptions | Schedule of Events | UCFV Home | UCFV A-Z | Apply Now | Contact Us 

Copyright © University College of the Fraser Valley (UCFV), 33844 King Road, Abbotsford, BC, Canada, V2S 7M8