‌Canada Census

“While the census and the statistical agency responsible for it are supposed to be ideology free and non-partisan, the census policy consequences that arise from its results often have effects on partisan politics, linked to the two central concerns of government: money and representation.”

From Debra Thompson. "The Politics of the Census: Lessons from Abroad." Canadian Public Policy 36.3 (2010): 377-382. Project MUSE. Web. 22 Jan. 2011. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>.

 

 

Doctors, merchants, farmers and schoolteachers walked door to door enumerating Canadians in 1861.

From Curtis, Bruce. The Politics of Population: State Formation, Statistics, and the Census of Canada, 1840-1875. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001. Print. p. 188.

“Many, though not all enumerators in Canada East recognized only teacher, nun, and servant or day labourer as women’s occupations. Some in Canada West called all women of working age ‘seamstress’ or ‘spinster.’“

From Curtis, Bruce. The Politics of Population: State Formation, Statistics, and the Census of Canada, 1840-1875. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001. Print. p. 229.


 

New France’s first Intendant, Jean Talon, conducted the first census in 1665-1666, shortly after his arrival. The census revealed that 46 per cent of the colony’s population of 547 settlers were unmarried and 90 per cent of those were male.

Cartier, Gwenaël. "City of Québec 1608-2008: 400 years of censuses." Canadian Social Trends 85 (2008): 62-72. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 24 May 2011.

 

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"In 1871 the questionnaire covered a variety of subjects, and asked 211 questions on area, land holdings, vital statistics, religion, education, administration, the military, justice, agriculture, commerce, industry and finance. Information was collected in tabular form on population, houses and other buildings, lands, industries and institutions. The population field included the age, sex, religion, education, race and occupation of each person."

From "History of the Census of Canada."Statistics Canada: Canada's national statistical agency / StatistiqueCanada :Organismestatistique national du Canada. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 May 2011. <http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/info/history.cfm>.

 

"Beginning in 1906, the prairie provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan began to take a separate census of agriculture every five years to monitor the growth of the West. Since 1956, the Census of Agriculture and the Census of Population have been taken together every five years across the entire country."

From "History of the Census of Canada."Statistics Canada: Canada's national statistical agency / StatistiqueCanada :Organismestatistique national du Canada. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 May 2011. <http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/info/history.cfm>.

 

 

 

   

In 1971, Statistics Canada introduced self enumeration. Up until then, every census had been conducted by personal interviews.

From "History of the Census of Canada."Statistics Canada: Canada's national statistical agency / StatistiqueCanada :Organismestatistique national du Canada. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 May 2011. <http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/info/history.cfm>.




Click here to read former Chief Statistician Munir Sheikh's July 21, 2010 open letter to Canadians.
 

 

Library and other Resources:

2006 Community Profiles: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/index.cfm?Lang=E

BC Stats British Columbia population projections, 2009 to 2036 [electronic resource]. [Victoria] : BC Stats, 2009. Call number: Internet (Web)

BC Stats: http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/

BC Vital Statistics: http://www.vs.gov.bc.ca/

Canada Yearbook 2009: http://www41.statcan.ca/ceb_r000_e.htm

Emery, George Neil. Facts of life : the social construction of vital statistics, Ontario, 1869-1952. Montréal : McGill-Queen's University Press, 1993. Call number: HA 39 C33 O64 1993 (Chilliwack)

Curtis, Bruce. The politics of population : state formation, statistics, and the census of Canada, 1840-1875. Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2001. Call number: HA 37 C32 C87 2001 (Chilliwack)

Data Services Libguide: http://libguides.ufv.ca/content.php?pid=140177&search_terms=data

E-stat: http://estat.statcan.ca/

Geography of Canada Libguide: http://libguides.ufv.ca/Geog130

Historical Statistics of Canada: http://www.publications.gc.ca/site/eng/286224/publication.html

Historical Geography Libguide: http://libguides.ufv.ca/HistoricalGeography

Rural Community Profiles: http://www.rural.gc.ca/RURAL/display-afficher.do?id=1230057084263&lang=eng

Statistical Resources Libguide: http://libguides.ufv.ca/StatisticalResources

Statistics Canada: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/start-debut-eng.html

Statistics Canada. How communities can use statistics. [Ottawa] : Statistics Canada, 1981. Call number: HA 37 C3 H69 (Chilliwack)

Statistics Canada. Demography Division Population projections for Canada, provinces and territories, 2009 to 2036 [electronic resource] Ottawa : Statistics Canada, 2010. Call number: E-book on the Internet (Web)

Statistics Canada: The Land: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/kits-trousses/cyb-adc1999/ecozone/edu04_0092c-eng.htm

Statistics Canada Maps and Geography: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/mgeo/index-eng.htm

StatsCan on Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/statcan_eng

StatsCan National Household Survey Questions: http://nhs.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm_r006-eng.htm

Canadian Century Research Infrastructure: Census enumations 1911-1951: http://ccri.library.ualberta.ca/enindex.html

CBC News: "StatsCan head quits over census dispute:" http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2010/07/21/statistics-canada-quits.html

last updated December 13, 2011, lm.

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