School of Criminology and Criminal Justice Values

Academic Rigor

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice expects faculty, staff, and students to encourage and demonstrate content mastery and uphold the highest standards and quality in teaching and learning. This constitutes meeting and exceeding educational expectations, challenging perspectives, asking questions, analyzing and evaluating information, and effectively applying what is learned.

Examples: Using class time fully and appropriately for the entire semester; Course material is comprehensive and current; Incorporating empirical research when writing papers; Understanding that meeting the minimum expectations of an assignment is not equivalent to receiving a high grade

Critical Thinking

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice expects faculty, staff, and students to be analytical, objective, relevant, and well-reasoned concerning both their own and other’s perspectives, re-examine and re-interpret their own and other’s perspectives, and contribute to solving problems within the criminal justice field. This constitutes supporting arguments with sound research evidence and reflection, and finding innovative solutions to address concerns with policy and practice.

Examples: Course material is relevant; Apply research to question the practices and policies of the criminal justice system; Consider how to implement positive and progressive changes; Demonstrate curiosity; Develop efficient and effective solutions

Fairness

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice expects faculty, staff, and students to be objective and impartial. This constitutes balancing conflicting interests and making appropriate accommodations in order to treat individuals equitably.

Examples: Clear and objective grading criteria; Refrain from allowing biases or stereotypes to influence perceptions; Distributing workloads equally when engaging in group work; Refrain from comparing individual instructional styles

Integrity

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice expects faculty, staff, and students to commit to ethical and professional practice whereby these principles guide what we say and do. This constitutes transparent decision making, and inclusive and honest practices.

Examples: Refrain from all forms of academic and non-academic misconduct; Report incidents of dishonest or unprofessional practices to appropriate individuals

Respect

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice expects faculty, staff, and students to welcome and appreciate the unique contributions and ideas of all individuals. This constitutes listening to and acknowledging diverse backgrounds and both individual and collective differences.

Examples: Provide constructive feedback on assignments; Show up for scheduled appointments; Review all course requirements, expectations, and School policies; Refrain from behaviours that obstruct the learning environment

Responsibility

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice expects faculty, staff, and students to be accountable for their words and actions and to lead by example. This constitutes making informed decisions, taking control of your educational experience, upholding the academic requirements of your courses and the School, and accepting the consequences of one’s choices.

Examples: Begin class on time; Knowledgeable about course material; Current knowledge of student program plans; Follow program plans; Regular class attendance; Arrive at classes on time; Take exams on the scheduled dates; Time management; Seek clarification; Adopt an internal locus of control

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