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Ceilidh Hart

Ceilidh Hart

Assistant Professor

English

Abbotsford campus, B338

Phone: 604-504-7441 ext. 4157

email Ceilidh

Education

PhD (University of Toronto)

Teaching Philosophy

In answer to the question, “Why poetry?” Don McKay cites Polish poet Adam Zagajewsi who says, “poetry allows us to experience astonishment and to pause in that astonishment for a long moment or two.”  I strive to create a classroom environment that respects and, indeed, validates that astonishment, whatever literary text we’re studying.  I believe the classroom should be a place where students feel welcome to reflect, to ask questions, and to make mistakes.  I insist, for them and for myself too, that these are moments for learning and that the process of literary analysis is often a heuristic one.  I emphasize the importance of dialogue to critical discourse: we do not need to agree, we do not need to always get it right, but there is, I suggest, value in the conversation that speaks to the value inherent in the art we study.

Teaching Interests

I teach Canadian literature broadly, from its earliest beginnings to contemporary writing.  I am particularly interested in connecting recent Canadian literature to its 19th-century precursors and exploring with students the important conversations between texts that result.  I have a passion for poetry, especially contemporary poetry, and I bring that into the classroom too.

I believe it’s important to connect the classroom with the community, and I encourage students in my Canadian literature courses to think beyond the texts we’re reading in class to broader socio-cultural structures; so, for example, we might listen to clips of the Massey Lectures, watch part of the Canada Reads debates, or explore the phenomenon of literary celebrity in Canada.

I am involved in efforts to indigenize the curriculum, and I continually seek ways of improving my teaching and the curriculum I deliver.

Research Interests

My doctoral research focused on nineteenth-century women’s writing and print culture.  My interest in early literary culture in Canada and in periodical publishing continues, and  I am increasingly interested in the echoes of these things in contemporary culture.  For example, my work extends the consideration of poetry as an opportunity for public engagement and the poet as a public figure by addressing twenty and twenty-first century examples, such as Sachiko Murakami’s online Project Rebuild and CBC Radio’s House Poet position.

In an unexpected leap in research topics, I am currently working on a project exploring the representation of the west (wild or otherwise) in Canadian literature.

Presentations

Selected:

“The West and the Aesthetics of Violence: Patrick DeWitt’s The Sisters Brothers and Michael Ondaatje’s The Collected Works of Billy the Kid.” Western Literature Association. Modern Language Association. January 2014.

“The Sound of Traffic: Cities, Motels, and Cars in Karen Solie’s Modern and Normal.” Association of Canadian and Quebec Literatures Conference. University of Victoria. June 2013.

“Isabella Valancy Crawford: Authorship and the Newspaper Press.” Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English. Wilfred Laurier University. May 2012.

“Hallowed Spaces/Public Places: Women’s Literary Voices and TheAcadian Recorder.”  Rediscovering Early Canadian Literature - Canadian Literature Symposium. University of Ottawa. May 2010.

“The Poetess and the Press: Literary History and the Newspaper Archives in Canada.” Archives and the Canadian Narrative – Re: Telling Canada’s Stories. Mount Allison University.  June 2009.

 “Rethinking the Sentimental in Sinclair Ross’s As For Me and My House.” Constructing Consciousness: From the Early Modern Period to the Present.  University of Toronto.  March 2007.

Publications

Selected:

Peer-Reviewed Articles and Book Chapters

“The Periodical Press: Newspapers, Magazines, and Literary Culture in Early Canada.” CanLit Guides. Canadian Literature forthcoming 2017.

 “Hallowed Spaces/Public Places: Women’s Literary Voices and The Acadian Recorder 1850-1900.” Home-Ground, Foreign Territory: Essays on Early Canadian Writing. Ed. Janice Fiamengo. Ottawa: U Ottawa Press, 2014. 237-256.

 Malcolm’s Katie: Exploring the Competing Narratives of a Complex Poem.” Studies in Canadian Literature 31.2 (2006): 7-22.

 Review Articles

Rev. of The Writings of David Thompson, Volume 2: The Travels, 1848 Version and Associated Texts. “Letters in Canada” University of Toronto Quarterly 86.3 (2016) forthcoming.

Rev. of Listening for the Heartbeat of Being: The Arts of Robert Bringhurst. BC Studies (2016) forthcoming.

Rev. of Basements and Attics, Closets and Cyberspace: Explorations in Canadian Women’s Archives. “Letters in Canada,” University of Toronto Quarterly 83.2 (2013).

Rev. of The Victorian Women Writers Project. Indiana University Digital Library Program. www.dlib.indianan.edu/collections/wwp/Papers of the      Bibliographical Society of Canada.  51.1 (2013): 167-9.

Rev. of Collected Poems of Isaballa Valancy Crawford. “Letters in Canada.” University of Toronto Quarterly 82.3 (2013).

Peer-Reviewed Articles and Book Chapters

“The Periodical Press: Newspapers, Magazines, and Literary Culture in Early Canada.”     CanLit Guides. Canadian Literature forthcoming 2017.

 

“Hallowed Spaces/Public Places: Women’s Literary Voices and The Acadian Recorder      1850-1900.” Home-Ground, Foreign Territory: Essays on Early Canadian         Writing. Ed. Janice Fiamengo. Ottawa: U Ottawa Press, 2014. 237-256.

 

Malcolm’s Katie: Exploring the Competing Narratives of a Complex Poem.” Studies in    Canadian Literature 31.2 (2006): 7-22.

 

Review Articles

Rev. of The Writings of David Thompson, Volume 2: The Travels, 1848 Version and A      Associated Texts. “Letters in Canada” University of Toronto Quarterly 86.3     (2016) forthcoming.

 

Rev. of Listening for the Heartbeat of Being: The Arts of Robert Bringhurst. BC Studies     (2016) forthcoming.

 

Rev. of Basements and Attics, Closets and Cyberspace: Explorations in Canadian Women’s Archives. “Letters in Canada,” University of Toronto Quarterly 83.2      (2013).

 

Rev. of The Victorian Women Writers Project. Indiana University Digital Library   Program. www.dlib.indianan.edu/collections/wwp/Papers of the      Bibliographical Society of Canada.  51.1 (2013): 167-9.

 

Rev. of Collected Poems of Isaballa Valancy Crawford. “Letters in Canada.” University of Toronto Quarterly             82.3 (2013).

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