Academic Calendar

Biology


English language proficiency requirements

Students registering in post-secondary level courses (numbered 100 to 499) will be required to meet the English language entrance proficiency requirements. Students in ELS or the University Foundations programs can register in those courses identified in the University Foundations program with lower levels of language proficiency.

Please note that not all courses are offered every semester.

BIO 083

3 credits

Adult Basic Education (ABE) Advanced Biology

Prerequisite(s): None. English 10 recommended.

A university preparatory course equivalent to Biology 11. Topics include ecology as it relates to current environmental problems; cell structure, function, and reproduction; and an overview of simple organisms such as algae and their relationship to advanced life forms of plants and animals. An important component of the course is a series of laboratory sessions that reinforce classroom topics.

BIO 093

3 credits

Provincial-Level Biology

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (C- or better in one of Anatomy and Physiology 12 or Biology 12) or (C+ or better in one of Biology 11, Life Sciences 11, or BIO 083).
Note: Chemistry 11 or CHEM 083, and/or Principles of Mathematics 11, Applications of Mathematics 11, Foundations of Mathematics 11, Pre-calculus 11, or MATH 085 are highly recommended.

Mammalian organ systems will be studied in detail. Organic and basic chemical processes will be used as a basis of study for the organ systems investigated. Laboratory skills are developed in a series of laboratory sessions designed to enhance the learning outcomes associated with the lecture material.

BIO 105

4 credits

Human Biology

Prerequisite(s): None

This course is designed for non-science students with an interest in biology. Cell and organismal physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, biotechnology, and basic ecology are studied in lectures and laboratory using the human organism as a focus.

Note: Students with credit for any Biology course numbered above 110 may not take this course for further credit.

BIO 106

4 credits

Ecology from an Urban Perspective

Prerequisite(s): None.

Designed for non-science students with an interest in ecology and the environment. Ecosystems, evolution, biodiversity, and features of populations and communities focused on examples found in local urban and rural ecosystems will be studied in lectures and laboratory.

Note: Students with credit for any Biology course numbered above 110 cannot take this course for further credit.

BIO 111

5 credits

Introductory Biology I

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: ([one of Life Sciences 11, Biology 11, or BIO 083 with a C+ or better] and [one of Chemistry 12, CHEM 093, or CHEM 110 with a C or better]) or ([one of Anatomy and Physiology 12, Biology 12, or BIO 093 with a C+ or better] and [one of Chemistry 11, Chemistry 12, CHEM 083, CHEM 093, or CHEM 110 with a C or better]).

A detailed overview of current concepts in biology designed for students majoring in biology or applying to professional programs. Emphasizes cellular basis of life, biochemical processes, cell structure, and genetics.

BIO 112

5 credits

Introductory Biology II

Prerequisite(s): BIO 111.

A continuation of the study of core biological concepts from BIO 111, designed for students majoring in biology or applying to professional programs. Includes an examination of ecology, anatomy and physiology, biodiversity, and evolution.

BIO 201

4 credits

Cell Biochemistry/Metabolism

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (BIO 112 and CHEM 114, both with a C+ or better) or (BIO 111, [CHEM 110 or CHEM 113], and [two of AGRI 123, AGRI 124, AGRI 129, AGRI 163, AGRI 203, AGRI 204, or AGRI 220], all with a C+ or better).

Studies the biochemistry, structure, and function of cellular components. Students examine pathways of chemotrophic and phototrophic metabolism in cells, focusing on cellular energy flow and control. Laboratory exercises emphasize the experimental evidence underlying current understanding of cell biochemistry and metabolism.

BIO 202

4 credits

Cell Signaling/Gene Regulation

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (BIO 112 and CHEM 114, both with a C+ or better) or (BIO 111, [CHEM 110 or CHEM 113], and [two of AGRI 123, AGRI 124, AGRI 129, AGRI 163, AGRI 203, AGRI 204, or AGRI 220], all with a C+ or better).

Focuses on cellular signal transduction. Topics covered include electrical and chemical signaling, DNA structure and genome organization, the cell cycle and cancer, biotechnology and genetic engineering, transcription and translation mechanisms, and the regulation of gene expression.

BIO 210

4 credits

Introduction to Ecology

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (BIO 112 and CHEM 114, both with a C+ or better) or (BIO 111, [CHEM 110 or CHEM 113], and [two of AGRI 123, AGRI 124, AGRI 129, AGRI 163, AGRI 203, AGRI 204, or AGRI 220], all with a C+ or better).

An introduction to fundamental ecological principles, theories, and methods at the individual, population, community, and ecosystem levels. Interactions between organisms and their abiotic and biotic environments are also examined, as well as the interrelationship between humans and the environment.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required.

BIO 219

4 credits

Biogeography

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: AGRI 163, BIO 105, BIO 106, BIO 111, CHEM 105, CHEM 110, CHEM 113, CHEM 150, GEOG 101, GEOG 102, GEOG 103, GEOG 116, PHYS 100, PHYS 101, PHYS 105, or PHYS 111.

Biogeography integrates geography, biology, geology, paleontology, and ecology. Learn how biogeographers study species distribution, track continental drift, and use fossils to help understand evolutionary changes in flora and fauna through geologic time.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.
Note: This course is offered as GEOG 219 (formerly GEOG 317) and BIO 219 (formerly BIO 317). Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 220

4 credits

Genetics

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (BIO 112 and CHEM 114, both with a C+ or better) or (BIO 111, [CHEM 110 or CHEM 113], and [two of AGRI 123, AGRI 124, AGRI 129, AGRI 163, AGRI 203, AGRI 204, or AGRI 220], all with a C+ or better).

Introductory genetics course dealing with the principles and concepts of transmission of genetic information in all living organisms. The function of a gene will be studied at the molecular level.

BIO 301

4 credits

Anatomy and Physiology of Invertebrates

Prerequisite(s): Any two Biology courses 200-level and above.

An introduction to one of the most abundant life forms on earth. Form and function, with reference to ecology and human impact, will be discussed and examined. Phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships will be emphasized with local examples of this group.

BIO 305

4 credits

Structural and Functional Anatomy of Vertebrates

Prerequisite(s): Any three 200-level or above Biology courses.

Focuses on the physiological and anatomical adaptations of the different vertebrate groups including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Covers the similarities and differences in the integumentary systems, musculoskeletal systems, sensory and nervous systems, and endocrine systems of vertebrate groups.

BIO 306

4 credits

Vertebrate Organ Systems

Prerequisite(s): Any three 200-level biology courses. Note: BIO 305 is recommended.

Focuses on the comparative anatomy and physiology of vertebrate organ systems. Organ systems covered in this course include cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive, and lymphatic/immune.

BIO 307

4 credits

Anatomy and Diversity of Plants

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210.

Focuses on the anatomy and life cycles of plants. Indigenous knowledge, evolutionary relationships, advances in forensics, and medicinal uses of plants will be explored. Laboratory exercises will focus on local flora.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required.

BIO 308

4 credits

Plant Physiology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201 and BIO 220.

Corequisite(s): BIO 320 recommended.

Principal mechanisms that govern the functioning and biochemistry of plants such as carbon and nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis, respiration, water relations, mineral nutrition, response to environmental signals, roles of plant hormones, and plant biotechnology.

BIO 309

4 credits

Microbiology I

Prerequisite(s): BIO 111, BIO 112, and 8 credits of 200-level or above Biology.

Examines advanced concepts in modern microbiology including the fundamentals of microbial structure, bioenergetics, growth, and genetics, predominately by considering a variety of bacteria and viruses.

BIO 310

3 credits

Conservation Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210.

Using an interdisciplinary approach drawing from ecology, evolution, genetics, ethics, society, politics, and law, this course examines both theoretical and practical aspects of conservation biology. Students will investigate the causes and extent of human impacts on the natural world and explore practical solutions to maintain biodiversity.

BIO 312

3 credits

Developmental Biology

Prerequisite(s): (BIO 202 or BIO 220) and two other 200-level Biology courses.

Embryonic development is studied at various levels: organismal, cellular, molecular, and genetic. Both classical and modern experimental approaches using several model species will be described.

BIO 319

4 credits

Swamps and Bogs

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: AGRI 204, AGRI 220, BIO 201, BIO 202, BIO 203, BIO 210, BIO 220, CHEM 213, CHEM 214, CHEM 221, CHEM 241, GEOG 201, GEOG 202, GEOG 211, GEOG 219/BIO 219, GEOG 252, GEOG 253, or GEOG 257/CMNS 257.

Swamps, bogs, and other types of wetlands provide essential ecosystem functions to watersheds that support them. Using hydrology, soils, and vegetation, students will learn how to delineate wetland boundaries and assess biogeochemical cycling along environmental gradients.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.
Note: This course is offered as GEOG 319 (formerly GEOG 417) and BIO 319 (formerly BIO 417). Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 320

3 credits

Biochemistry

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201 and CHEM 213.

Covers the structures, function, and metabolic interactions of lipids, steroids, vitamins, amino acids, and proteins. An emphasis will be placed on metabolic processes that have an impact on human diseases.

Note: This course is offered as BIO 320 and BIOC 320. Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 330

4 credits

Plants and Animals of British Columbia

Prerequisite(s): 60 university-level credits, including BIO 210.

An introduction to some of the most common species of plants, birds, and mammals of British Columbia. Through lecture and laboratory experience, students will learn systematic identification of major families of organisms. The ecology and distribution of organisms will be discussed in the context of the Biogeoclimatic Ecosystem Classification system currently used in British Columbia.

BIO 333

3 credits

Bioinformatics I

Prerequisite(s): BIO 220.

An introduction to major concepts in bioinformatics. Students will use both classroom and computer-based methods to explore how genomic and proteomic data is obtained, assembled, and analyzed. Students will be introduced to software and databases used in bioinformatic analysis.

BIO 335

4 credits

Freshwater Ecology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210 or GEOG 202.

The study of inland waters including lakes, wetlands, rivers, and streams. Topics include the biotic components of freshwater ecosystems such as invertebrate and fish communities, the hydrology and geology of lake and stream systems, and the fundamentals of surface water chemistry and physics.

Note: This course is offered as BIO 335 and GEOG 335. Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 340

4 credits

Population and Community Ecology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210 and MATH 111.

An introduction to the study of ecological populations and communities, including processes that create, modify, and maintain patterns in biodiversity, population dynamics, species interactions, niche theory, ecological networks, community structure and assembly, and metapopulation and metacommunity dynamics. Laboratories will introduce students to research methods used to study populations and communities in both the lab and the field and will further students’ understanding of the process of science in an ecological context, including use of the R language for data analysis.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required.

BIO 350

3 credits

Medical Genetics

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201, BIO 202, and BIO 220.

Examines the inheritance of diseases in human families and analyzes molecular mechanisms through which genetic changes cause disease. Discusses aspects of genetic counselling and bioethics related to medical genetics.

BIO 357

4 credits

Conservation GIS

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

Concepts in conservation planning and management will be investigated through the application of spatial analysis techniques and Geography Information Systems (GIS).

Note: This course is offered as GEOG 357 and BIO 357. Students may take only one of these for credit.

Note: Students with credit for GEOG 300J cannot take this course for further credit.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

BIO 360

4 credits

Insect Biology

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level or above Biology courses.

Topics include internal and external anatomy, moulting and growth, locomotion, reproduction, insects and their relationships with plants and animals, insects as pests, and social insects. A survey of major insect orders and families and an insect collection will be required.

BIO 370

4 credits

Introduction to Mycology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210 and two other 200-level or above Biology courses.

An introduction to the study of fungi. Lecture topics include origin and evolution, Indigenous uses, taxonomy, structure, genomics, metabolism, nutritional acquisition, ecology, pathology, and mycoses. The lab includes both laboratory and field components that give students hands-on exposure to the topics covered in lecture.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required.

BIO 380

4 credits

Ornithology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210 and 45 university-level credits.

An introduction to the study of birds and their diversity. Topics include the origin and evolution of birds; avian taxonomy; avian flight and the design of feathers; long-distance migration; avian reproductive anatomy, physiology, and reproductive strategies; avian behavior and communication; cognition; and the conservation of birds.

BIO 383

3 credits

Human Physiology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201 and BIO 202.

Examines the endocrine, nervous, sensory, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, and gastrointestinal systems of humans. This course is meant as a survey of the different organ systems in humans with particular focus on physiological principles and mechanisms.

BIO 385

3 credits

Neurobiology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 111, BIO 112, and BIO 201.

Pre- or corequisite(s): BIO 202

An exploration of human neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. This course investigates the neural structures and activities underlying various human behaviours and system functions as well as the neural pathology underlying various brain disorders.

BIO 390

4 credits

Animal Behaviour

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210

An introduction to the relationship between the behaviour of animals and their survival and reproduction in natural environments. This course surveys the theory and principles used in ecological and evolutionary analyses of animal behaviour.

Note: Students with credit for BIO 420T cannot take this course for further credit.

BIO 401

3 credits

Molecular Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201, BIO 202, and BIO 220.

A study of the techniques employed in molecular biology covering concepts such as gene expression, cell organization, cell function, and the control of cell division and growth. Incudes analysis of classic and current scientific literature.

BIO 403

4 credits

Molecular Techniques I

Prerequisite(s): BIO 202, BIO 220, BIO 309, and one of the following: BIO 312, BIO 320, BIO 425, or BIO 401.

An intensive laboratory course that introduces students to the methodology used in recombinant DNA technology using an integrated series of molecular biology techniques. Techniques studied include cloning, subcloning, restriction mapping, PCR analysis, and bioinformatics. This course prepares students for careers in research or the biotechnology/pharmaceuticals industry.

Note: This course is offered as BIOC 403 and BIO 403. Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 406

3 credits

Advanced Genetics

Prerequisite(s): BIO 202 and BIO 220.

A number of emerging areas of interest in genetics will be covered, including the genetics of human complex disease, epigenetics and environmental influences on our genes, genomics and personalized medicine, the genetics of infectious disease, legal and ethical issues arising from advances in genetics, and quantitative and evolutionary genetics of populations.

BIO 407

3 credits

Applied Biotechnology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201, BIO 220. BIO 320 recommended.

Biotechnology utilizes biological processes, organisms, or systems for human use. This course examines the application of biotechnology to disciplines such as genetics, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and the impact these technologies have on medicine, industry, the environment, and agriculture.

Note: Students with credit for BIO 405 cannot take this course for further credit.

BIO 408

3 credits

Directed Studies in Biology I

Prerequisite(s): (B+ or better in three of BIO 201, BIO 202, BIO 210, or BIO 220), and instructor's permission.

Designed for students in a Biology major or minor, this course provides an opportunity to apply scientific principles in a creative hands-on directed studies research experience outside the usual course format. Students will develop their own projects in biology under the supervision of a faculty member with expertise in the field.

BIO 409

6 credits

Directed Studies in Biology II

Prerequisite(s): (B+ or better in three of BIO 201, BIO 202, BIO 210, or BIO 220), and instructor's permission.

Designed for students in a Biology major or minor, this course provides an opportunity to apply scientific principles in a creative hands-on directed studies research experience outside the usual course format. Students will develop their own projects in biology under the supervision of a faculty member with expertise in the field. BIO 409 is similar to BIO 408, but is designed to accommodate more ambitious projects.

Note: This course is often taken over two semesters as BIO 409A and BIO 409B.

BIO 410

4 credits

Plant Ecology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210 or GEOG 219/BIO 219.

Examines the interactions of plants with their abiotic and biotic environment, population biology, the structure and dynamics of plant communities, ecosystems, landscapes, and climate. Field methods and analysis techniques for studying plant ecology will be covered.

Note: This course is offered as BIO 410 and GEOG 410. Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 412

3 credits

Advanced Metabolism

Prerequisite(s): BIO 320/BIOC 320. Note: 6 credits of 200-level or higher Chemistry are recommended.

Provides a detailed examination of selected primary and secondary metabolic pathways and their relationship to human health and disease.

Note: This course is offered as BIOC 412 and BIO 412. Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 414

3 credits

Genomics

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201, BIO 202, and BIO 220.

Examines how genetic information is encoded, ordered, and expressed in whole organisms. Methods for obtaining, assembling, and annotating genomic sequences are explored. Students gain hands-on computer experience using various bioinformatics tools to handle and interpret genomic sequence data.

Note: This course is offered as BIO 414 and BIOC 414. Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 415

3 credits

Cancer Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201, BIO 202, and BIO 220.

Cancer biology examines the genetic, developmental and environmental basis of this disease, and explores current as well as future anti-cancer treatments. Topics to be covered include tumorgenesis, control of the cell cycle, the role of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, angiogenesis, metastasis, immunotherapy, and novel approaches to cancer treatment.

BIO 416

3 credits

Evolution

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210, BIO 220, and one 300-level or above Biology course.

An investigation of the mechanisms and processes of evolution that occur from the molecular to the species level and across a few generations to millennia. Evolutionary analysis will be applied to the study of the history of life, natural selection, sexual selection, speciation, life history characteristics, and contemporary topics such as human medicine and environmental issues.

BIO 418

4 credits

Ethnobotany

Prerequisite(s): 60 university-level credits including BIO 210.

The relationship between plants and human cultures, with a focus on the Indigenous Peoples and environments of northwestern North America. Use of plants as foods, materials and medicines, plant nomenclature and folk classification, and the role of plants in religion and mythology.

Note: Students with credit for BIO 421Q cannot take this course for further credit.

BIO 419

4 credits

Paleoecology

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 302, GEOG 303, GEOG 304, GEOG 307, GEOG 308, GEOG 315, GEOG 319/BIO 319, GEOG 335, BIO 301, BIO 305, BIO 306, BIO 307, BIO 308, BIO 310, BIO 330, BIO 335, BIO 340, BIO 360, or BIO 370.

Paleoecology is the study of past environments through the use of fossils, geochemistry, and radiometric dating. During this course you will learn how to reconstruct past environmental change driven by climate, sea-level change, earthquakes, floods, and fire.
Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

Note: This course is offered as GEOG 419 and BIO 419. Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 420

3 credits

Special Topics in Biology

Prerequisite(s): Any three 200-level or above Biology courses.

Students will have an opportunity for an in-depth investigation of specialist areas in biology, under the guidance of an expert in the field. Students must check with the Biology department to determine course availability and content area for a particular semester.

Note: This course will be offered under different letter designations (e.g. C-Z) representing different topics. This course may be repeated for credit provided the letter designation differs.

BIO 421

4 credits

Special Topics in Applied Biology

Prerequisite(s): Any three 200-level or above Biology courses.

Students will have an opportunity to explore a specialized aspect of biology with an expert in the field. Field trips and/or laboratory exercises will introduce methodologies of the specialist area.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required.

BIO 425

4 credits

Introductory Medical Microbiology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 309.

Focuses on the relationship between human health and microbes. The functioning of the immune system, the normal human flora, and diseases caused by microbial pathogens will be studied.

BIO 426

4 credits

Environmental Microbiology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201 and 309.

An examination of pathogenesis, pollution remediation, energy conservation, and the symbiotic relationships between microorganisms and higher organisms which are important to life. This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to study the physiology, ecology, biochemistry, and genetics of microorganisms as they interface with us and our environment, including soil, aquatics, and the atmosphere.

BIO 427

3 credits

Plants and Drugs

Prerequisite(s): 60 university-level credits.

An investigation into the impact plants have on the development of medicinal compounds. How plants influence the cultural use and linguistic terms associated with healing will be an integral part of this course. An analysis of cultural and medicinal impact both Indigenous and western will be included.

Note: Students with credit for BIO 420G cannot take this course for further credit.

BIO 430

3 credits

Forest Ecology

Prerequisite(s): 75 university-level credits, including BIO 210.

An overview of the structure and function of forest ecosystems, with a special reference to forests of British Columbia and Canada. An introduction to the interaction of forest organisms with their physical and biotic environment.

BIO 433

3 credits

Bioinformatics II

Prerequisite(s): BIO 333.

Students will consider recent literature and focus on current topics in bioinformatics, including analysis of the benefits and limitations of existing software, unique challenges in the analysis of different “omics” data, as well as the legal and ethical implications involved with examining and storing genetic information.

BIO 442

8 credits

Biological Field School

Prerequisite(s): Any three BIO courses numbered 200 or above and permission of the department.

An opportunity for an intensive, prolonged, biological learning experience which takes place in unique locations away from the UFV campus. Students will participate in hands-on research in the field and will analyze and present their findings.

Note: Students must check with the biology department to determine course availability and content area for a particular semester.

Note: This course will be offered under different letter designations (e.g. C-Z) representing different topics. This course may be repeated for credit provided the letter designation differs. However, students can only take one BIO 442 topic for upper-level Biology credit for the Biology Honours, major, or minor.

BIO 448

3 credits

Immunology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201, BIO 202, and BIO 220.

Explores the cellular and molecular participants in the immune response. The relationship between immune mechanisms and medical problems will also be discussed, such as allergy, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, infection, and organ transplantation.

BIO 477

4 credits

Traditional Ecological Knowledges

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including 6 credits of IPK or FNST. Biology students can contact the instructor for permission to register.

This course explores Indigenous approaches to botany, zoology, and ecology. Possible topics include classification, traditional ecological knowledge, harvesting, natural resource management, animal care, and relationships to other aspects of Indigenous life, culture, and land claims. Emphasis is on traditional Northwest Coast knowledge.

Note: This course includes class field trips.

Note: This course is offered as IPK 477 and BIO 477. Students may take only one of these for credit.

BIO 496

1 credit

Advanced Biological Topics

Prerequisite(s): Any three 200-level or above Biology courses and permission of the faculty supervisor.

Students will have the opportunity for an in-depth investigation of a specialist area of biology, under the guidance of an expert in the field. Students must obtain a faculty supervisor for this course before registering.

Note: This course will be offered under different letter designations (e.g. C-Z) representing different topics. This course may be repeated for credit provided the letter designation differs.

BIO 498

2 credits

Advanced Biological Topics

Prerequisite(s): Any three 200-level or above Biology courses and permission of the faculty supervisor.

Students will have the opportunity for an in-depth investigation of a specialist area of biology, under the guidance of an expert in the field. Students must obtain a faculty supervisor for this course before registering.

Note: This course will be offered under different letter designations (e.g. C-Z) representing different topics. This course may be repeated for credit provided the letter designation differs.

BIO 499

9 credits

Honours Research Thesis

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Biology Honours and 10 credits of 300-level or above Biology.

Students will conduct a biology research project under the supervision of a researcher (e.g. faculty member) over two semesters. The research results will be written as a thesis and presented as a seminar and at a research conference.

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