Academic Calendar Fall 2018

Criminology/Criminal Justice

Many of the seats in these courses are reserved for students in a Criminal Justice program. Other students may take these courses if they meet the prerequisites and there is space. In all courses, students who do not satisfy the prerequisites may request instructor’s permission to register in the course.


English language proficiency requirements

Students registering in post-secondary level courses (numbered 100 to 499) will be required to meet the English language entrance proficiency requirements. Students in ELS or the University Foundations programs can register in those courses identified in the University Foundations program with lower levels of language proficiency.

Please note that not all courses are offered every semester.

CRIM 100

3 credits

Introduction to Criminology

Prerequisite(s): None.

Examines the historical evolution of criminological thought and criminology as a science and a profession. Investigates the structure, content, theoretical paradigms, and practical applications of the discipline, as well as some of its terminology.

CRIM 103

3 credits

Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

Prerequisite(s): None

Analyzes historical and contemporary operational practices of the criminal justice system (CJS). Students are taken through the CJS process, beginning with the moment a crime is reported through the various decision stages to the paroled release of a convicted offender.

CRIM 104

3 credits

Sociological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

Prerequisite(s): None.

Examines the sociological, sociocultural, and sociopsychological explanations of criminal and deviant behavior, which include ecological theories of crime and delinquency, conflict theories, control theories, and symbolic interactionist theories.

CRIM 105

3 credits

Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

Prerequisite(s): None.

Examines the causes of criminal and deviant behaviour through psychological theories, including psychophysiological, psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, and biological theories.

CRIM 129

3 credits

Academic and Professional Development

Prerequisite(s): None.

Introduces knowledge and skills necessary for success in the Criminal Justice program, field placements, and the profession. Emphasis is placed on developing writing skills, and students are challenged to assess their interests, values, beliefs, and ethical stance on critical issues.

CRIM 135

3 credits

Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course introduces students to the Canadian legal system in preparation for law-related courses. It examines the origins and role of law, our system of courts, the legal profession, legal reasoning and statutory interpretation, and private and public substantive law.

CRIM 201

2 credits

Physical Fitness Training I

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course provides an individualized fitness program utilizing modern fitness facilities and sophisticated evaluation procedures.

Note: Students will be required to attend fitness facilities three times per week.

Note: Students may not enrol in CRIM 201 and CRIM 202 concurrently. It is recommended that students take CRIM 201 prior to CRIM 202.

CRIM 202

2 credits

Physical Fitness Training II

Prerequisite(s): None. CRIM 201 is recommended. Note: As of January 2019, prerequisites will change to: CRIM 201.

This course provides a continuation of CRIM 201. Each student’s program will be re-evaluated and intensified.

Note: Students will be required to attend fitness facilities three times per week.
Note: Students should complete CRIM 201 prior to taking CRIM 202.

CRIM 203

2 credits

Peace Officer Use of Force

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course provides students with an opportunity to learn and practise physical contact tactics specifically related to law enforcement.

CRIM 205

3 credits

Police Psychology and Risk Assessment

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 105, or students with related work experience may request a prerequisite waiver from the instructor

This course provides an introduction to the assessment of risk for sexually deviant and violent behaviour. Students will learn the factors correlated to the prediction of violent and sexually deviant behaviour including psychopathy, mental illness, personality disorders, and developmental history. The effect of substance abuse on an individual's propensity for violence and criminal behaviour will also be explored

CRIM 210

3 credits

Youth Crime and the Youth Justice System in Canada

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course provides students with an analysis of the nature, prevalence, characteristics, and consequences of youth crime in Canada. It provides an overview of the historical development of Canada’s juvenile justice and child protection systems, and reviews current political, social, legal, and criminological issues associated with youth crime in Canada.

CRIM 211

3 credits

Indigenous Peoples, Crime and Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s): None

Examines historical and contemporary issues regarding Indigenous peoples, crime, and the criminal justice system, including the impact of colonization, government policies and programs, and the increasing role of Indigenous communities in implementing justice initiatives.

CRIM 212

3 credits

Women, Crime and Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s): None.

Examines the nature of crimes committed by females and common sociological, sociocultural, and sociopsychological explanations. Explores women’s experiences as survivors and victims of criminal behaviour, and as professionals working within the criminal justice system, alongside societal responses to female victims, offenders, and professionals.

CRIM 213

3 credits

Directed Studies

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Director and the Dean of Arts.

Independent reading and research topics will be selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. Students interested in more information should contact the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

CRIM 214

3 credits

Selected Topics in Crime and Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s): None.

Reviews theory, methods, and research results in a selected area of criminal justice. Students should check with the Criminology and Criminal Justice department to determine the content area for a particular semester.

CRIM 214G

3 credits

Selected Topics in Crime and Criminal Justice: Family Violence

Prerequisite(s): None

This course will review theory, methods, and research results in a selected area of criminal justice. Students should check with the Criminology and Criminal Justice department to determine the content area for a particular semester.

CRIM 215

3 credits

Theory and Practice of Restorative Justice

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides students with an introduction to the theory and practice of restorative justice. Theoretical, historical, and philosophical perspectives on restorative justice will be analyzed. Foundational principles and values of restorative justice will be explored in the context of restorative justice as a response to crime and violence distinct from traditional methods within the criminal justice system. A variety of processes and program models for restorative justice will also be examined with emphasis on program effectiveness.

CRIM 216

3 credits

Psychopathy and the Criminal Justice System

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course will examine the definition, root causes, and behaviour of psychopaths, and the response of the criminal justice system to this personality disorder.

CRIM 220

3 credits

Research Methods in Criminology

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 100 and one of: CRIM 104, CRIM 105, PSYC 101 or SOC 101

This course is designed as an introduction to criminological research and is intended to develop the students' research and analytical skills. The course will focus on the theory of inquiry, the logic, reality and structure of criminological inquiry, and criminological analysis and reporting.

CRIM 230

3 credits

Criminal Law

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course investigates the nature, purpose, scope, sources, and basic principles of criminal law within its historical and contemporary contexts. The evolution of such legal concepts as guilt, criminal responsibility, and due process of law is also studied.

CRIM 240

3 credits

Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 103.

An introduction to the study of several criminal justice systems. Focus will be placed on the role of political institutions, criminal law, history, and culture on the development of criminal justice systems. Includes an exploration of how different criminal justice systems respond to common problems, issues, and events.

CRIM 250

3 credits

Customs and Immigration Law

Prerequisite(s): None

For students considering a career in Customs or Immigration, as well as for those with particular interest in this area, this course examines the Customs and Excise division of Revenue Canada, as well as the Immigration department, from an organization and legal perspective. The course covers the role of Customs and Excise as a part of the Revenue Canada mandate, relevant legislation such as the Customs Act and the Narcotic Control Act, current issues surrounding Customs policies, as well as internal regulatory procedures (e.g., search and seizure, appeal procedures and citizen’s rights). Also included are the other issues which relate to the Customs and Immigration authority, such as primary duties and relevant sections of the Criminal Code of Canada.

CRIM 251

3 credits

Law Enforcement in Canada

Prerequisite(s): None.

Surveys law enforcement agencies, discussing the development of policing in Canada, their role in society, organizational structure and management, and community expectations of their task. Specific police functions and powers are examined. Key issues include use of force, corruption, accountability, ethics, and the political dimension of police work.

CRIM 252

3 credits

Corrections in Canada

Prerequisite(s): None.

Examines the history of correctional systems in Canada, as well as the current theory and practices of corrections. Topics include sentencing, the incarceration process, probation, parole, institutional programs, rehabilitation, offender case management, community-based correctional programs, correctional workers, and community involvement in corrections.

CRIM 265

3 credits

Problem Management Skills for Criminal Justice Interventions

Prerequisite(s): None. Note: As of January 2019, prerequisites will change to: CRIM 129.

Provides students with foundational concepts and skills for responding to common criminal justice situations. Students learn and apply communication, teamwork, and leadership concepts and strategies; apply problem-solving, conflict, and ethical decision-making models; and examine their own strengths and weaknesses using personality assessment instruments.

CRIM 270

4 credits

Introduction to Forensic Biology

Prerequisite(s): five university transfer courses, one of which must be from the following list: BIO 105, BIO 106, BIO 111, BIO 112 or CHEM 150

This course introduces the student to the techniques involved in locating, processing and interpreting forensic scenes with human remains. Students will learn to interpret the effects of biological and environmental factors on forensic scenes. Students will learn basic osteology so that they can identify human remains, determine their sex, age, ancestry, and stature and correctly interpret any associated trauma to the bones. This course includes a required one-day field exercise. Students must have a current tetanus shot.
Note: Credit cannot be obtained for both CRIM 270 and BIO 270.

CRIM 281

6 credits

Field Work Practicum

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 100, CRIM 103, CRIM 104, CRIM 105, (B- or better in CRIM 129), CRIM 265, (one of CMNS 125, CMNS 155, or ENGL 105 or higher), CGPA of 2.67 or greater, and department permission.

This course provides students with a supervised work experience in a criminal justice or community agency.

Note: Enrolment in this course is by prior arrangement with the Career Development Coordinator.

CRIM 310

3 credits

Advanced Theoretical Perspectives

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 104, and CRIM 105.

Explores the diverse nature of knowledge within the field of crime and deviance by focusing on contemporary criminological theories and their related research. Practical and political implications of the theories are also discussed.

CRIM 311

3 credits

Diversity, Crime, and Criminal Justice in Canada

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 103, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Examines the social construction of “difference” and inequalities faced by selected identity groups in their interactions with Canadian laws and the criminal justice system. Students will explore innovative options for social change and social justice.

CRIM 320

3 credits

Quantitative Research Techniques

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Bachelor of Arts (Criminal Justice) and 45 university-level credits including CRIM 220, 6 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM, and one of (STAT 104, STAT 106, or PSYC 110 with a C or better).

Students will become familiar with quantitative data analyses. The concepts underlying statistical tests will be discussed. Students will also gain practical experience with statistics using a statistical program on computers to analyze and interpret data.

CRIM 321

3 credits

Qualitative Research Methods

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Bachelor of Arts (Criminal Justice) and 45 university-level credits including CRIM 220 and 6 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Examines the foundations of research and the qualitative methods and techniques most commonly used in criminology. Will involve critical analysis of methods, consideration of ethics, and the design and completion of a qualitative research project.

CRIM 330

3 credits

Criminal Procedure and Evidence

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 103, CRIM 230, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Examines the progression of criminal cases through the court system. Topics include jurisdiction, search and seizure, arrest, judicial interim release, the determination of admissibility of evidence, and the impact of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms on criminal procedure and evidence.

CRIM 335

3 credits

Human Rights and Civil Liberties

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100 and 6 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM. POSC 110 is strongly recommended.

Provides an inquiry into the historical, legal, and political nature of human rights and civil liberties. Topics may include armed conflicts; doctrines promoting human rights and individual liberties; slavery and human trafficking; terrorism; international crimes; and political, social, economic, and gender rights.

CRIM 339

3 credits

Professional Ethics in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 103, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Studies professional ethics in the criminal justice system, with a special focus on law enforcement. Four main subject areas include ethics education, dominant theoretical approaches, development of professional ethics, and ethical leadership.

CRIM 400

3 credits

Terrorism

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including 9 credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Examines the nature, extent, and causes of terrorism as an officially designated crime. Emphasis is placed on extremism as a foundation for terrorism, specific types of terrorism, and how governments and law enforcement agencies seek to counter terrorism.

CRIM 401

3 credits

Sex Work and the Law

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including 9 credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Explores legal, political, and social contexts surrounding sex work by critically evaluating research from a variety of sources. Topics include legislative history, research challenges and ethical issues, type of sex work and sex worker, vulnerable populations and exploitation, trafficking, and law reform.

CRIM 402

3 credits

Mental Disorder and Crime

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including 9 credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Students will review the history and current legislation that govern mental disorder and crime. The relationship between crime and specific disorders, such as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and schizophrenia, will be examined. The response to these disorders by criminal justice agencies will be evaluated.

Note: Students with credit for CRIM 410G cannot take this course for further credit.

CRIM 403

3 credits

Advanced Studies in Youth Crime and Justice

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Criminal Justice degree program with a minimum of 45 university-level credits, including CRIM 210 and six additional credits of lower-level CRIM; or ermission of the School of
Criminology and Criminal Justice.

This course is designed to advance the knowledge base of CRIM 210, Young Offenders and the Youth Justice System and provide students with practical skills that will assist them in working with at-risk populations of children and youth. Students will learn about the variety of at-risk populations of children and youth, and local and international best practices for preventing and intervening to reduce their risk of developing negative psychosocial outcomes, including mental health issues, addictions, homelessness, and contact with the criminal justice system. Local Indigenous practices and strategies, as well as international policies and practices, designed to mitigate risk among child and youth populations will be discussed. This course will apply a developmental perspective in understanding and responding to the issues faced by at-risk populations of children and youth, and will pay particular attention to specific segments of this population, including Indigenous, mentally ill, and LGBTQ children and youth, as well as children with incarcerated parents and child victims/witnesses of violence within and outside of the criminal justice system.

CRIM 410

3 credits

Selected Topics in Crime and Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 103, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Critically reviews selected criminal justice phenomena through an analysis of theory, methods, and research.

Note: Students should check with the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice or the timetable to determine content area and prerequisites for a particular semester.

CRIM 411

3 credits

Directed Studies

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the director and the dean.

Independent reading and research topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor.

Note: Students interested in more information should contact the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

CRIM 412

3 credits

Organized Crime

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 103, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Examines the issue of organized crime in Canada and its transnational dimension. Grounded in empirical research on various forms of organized crime and on the effectiveness of the criminal justice system response to this particular threat.

CRIM 413

3 credits

History and Philosophy of Police Practices

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 151

This course surveys contemporary police practices (such as organization, enforcement emphasis, recruiting, community relations, role in politics, response to crime, use of force) in the modern world, with a special emphasis on democratic states. Consequently, international police practices will be examined in the context of their historical and philosophical roots. Although there will be a special emphasis on policing in Canada, the general concept of policing in a democracy will be examined through a comparative study of policing in countries such as England, the United States, France, Israel, and others.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 414

3 credits

Intervention Techniques in Corrections

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into a degree program (with a minimum of 45 university-transferable credits) and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100 and 101

This course will examine the methods and means that criminal justice system personnel and associated professionals use to change criminal behaviour. The primary focus of these intervention techniques is to reduce recidivism. The course will review techniques that span from supervision to psychotherapy both inside and outside of jail or prison. The course is to develop the ability to critically analyze the theoretical foundations and treatment effectiveness (e.g., quantitative outcome research) of approaches in this area.
Note: Criminology courses number 410 to 419 are not necessarily offered on an annual basis. Student should check the current timetable or contact the Criminology and Criminal Justice department for further information.

CRIM 415

3 credits

Safe Schools: Moving from Policy to Practice

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Criminal Justice degree program with a minimum of 45 university-level credits including nine credits of lower-level CRIM, to include CRIM 103 and 230; or permission of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

This course explores issues related to safer schools and communities by examining the nature and extent of intimidation and harassment in schools, educational and administrative responses to various aspects of school safety, and educational and administrative strategies to develop healthier and more inclusive educational settings. Philosophical and sociological discussions of educating for citizenship will provide the theoretical framework for the examination of safer schools.
Note: Students with credit for CRIM 410D cannot take CRIM 415 for further credit.

CRIM 416

3 credits

Media, Crime, and Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 103, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Focuses on the relationship between media and the criminal justice system. The “social construction of reality”, role of the media in creating and maintaining ideologies about crime, media distortion and sensationalism, and media as a cause and cure for crime are discussed.

CRIM 417

3 credits

Leadership in Groups and Organizations

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Criminal Justice degree program with a minimum of 45 university-level credits, to include BUS 203 or BUS 307 and nine credits of lower-level CRIM including CRIM 100; or permission of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice

This theoretical and competency-based leadership course prepares students to assess and develop their potential for leadership. Students will learn the differences between leadership and management, study an overview of leadership theory, including international and Aboriginal perspectives on leadership, and learn a new model for transformative leadership interventions for groups and organizations. Students will assess and develop key knowledge and skill areas that will enable them to facilitate the development of individuals, groups, and organizations. Students will develop the ability to shift styles, skills, and roles appropriately, thereby increasing the effectiveness of their interventions.

CRIM 418

3 credits

Techniques of Crime Prevention

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 103, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Critically examines the contemporary field of crime prevention. Students will examine the theoretical foundations of various approaches to crime prevention and the evaluative research available to assess the efficacy of these initiatives.

CRIM 419

3 credits

Victimology

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including 9 credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

An introduction to victimology’s key concepts and to the study of various forms of victimization, the risk of victimization, the experience of victims of crime, the rights of victims, and the impact of various forms of victimization and associated trauma.

CRIM 421

6 credits

Research Proposal

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Criminal Justice degree program, CRIM 220

This course is designed as an upper-level university research seminar in criminology and criminal justice. It consists of individual student consultation with the instructor to guide students through to the main requirement of the course – the completion of a detailed research proposal. The course is based on the assumption that incoming students are reasonably well versed in research methods. It is also assumed that since the course is primarily intended as a proposal/research seminar, students will take a very active and independent role in acquiring and demonstrating their research expertise.
Note: Students with CRIM 420 cannot obtain further credit for CRIM 421.

CRIM 435

3 credits

Innovations in Criminal Justice and Public Safety

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 103, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Identifies areas within the criminal justice system where current processes, techniques, methods, and approaches appear to be either ineffective or inefficient, discusses the reasons for the current problems, and explores innovative, evidence-based strategies to prevent crime and improve the criminal justice system.

CRIM 450

3 credits

Social Policy Analysis

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Bachelor of Arts (Criminal Justice) and 45 university-level credits including CRIM 100, CRIM 103, and 3 additional credits of 100- or 200-level CRIM.

Discusses how social and criminal justice problems are recognized, defined, and solved with policy. Focuses on the construction, implementation, and evaluation of policy, and examines various influencing forces over policymaking.

CRIM 470

4 credits

Advanced Forensic Biology

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 270 or BIO 270

This course further develops the investigative techniques and methodology of forensic biology. Topics of further study will include the investigation and methods of processing and interpreting human remains. Students will use biological and physical features of the environment to interpret remains recovered from buried, scattered, underwater (ocean and freshwater), and arson scenes. Advanced studies will examine juvenile and developmental osteology. New advancements in the field involving DNA and individualizing techniques will also be examined. This course includes a required one-day field exercise. Students must have a current tetanus shot and steel toed boots.
Note: This course is offered as BIO 470 and CRIM 470. Students may take only one of these for credit.

CRIM 479

3 credits

Professional Practice II

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Criminal Justice degree program, CRIM 281, CRIM 310, CRIM 311, CRIM 320, CRIM 321, and department permission.

Corequisite(s): CRIM 480.

This course enhances field placement learning through the application and analysis of foundational concepts, skills, and theories from previous coursework. Learners will reflect on their field placement experiences, share problem solving techniques, successes, and challenges, and draw links between theory and practice.

CRIM 480

6 credits

Field Work Practicum

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Bachelor of Arts (Criminal Justice), CRIM 281, CRIM 310, CRIM 311, CRIM 320, CRIM 321, and department permission See additional practicum regulations in the academic calendar.

Corequisite(s): CRIM 479.

Provides students with a supervised work experience in a criminal justice or community agency.

CRIM 481

6 credits

Field Work Practicum

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 281, CRIM 310, CRIM 311, CRIM 320, CRIM 330, CRIM 335 and instructor's permission

This is a supervised work experience in a criminal justice or community agency. The goals and objectives of this course are similar to the field work practicum in CRIM 280/281; however, more advanced levels of performance are required. (Enrolment in this course is by prior arrangement with the Career Development Coordinator, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice.)

CRIM 490

4 credits

Honours Thesis Development

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Criminal Justice Honours program and permission of a supervising instructor.

This course provides students enrolled in the Criminal Justice Honours program an opportunity to develop a research proposal consisting of i) a comprehensive critical review of the literature related to their Honours thesis project; ii) a data collection instrument; and iii) request for ethical review and minimal risk checklist. The course is taken under the direction of a single faculty member. The student will meet with their supervisor on a regular basis to develop their research proposal.

CRIM 491

6 credits

Honours Project

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Criminal Justice Honours program, permission of a supervising instructor, and CRIM 490.

This course provides students enrolled in the Criminal Justice Honours program with an opportunity to collect and analyze the data for their honours thesis proposal developed in CRIM 490 and to disseminate their research findings in a research paper and public presentation.

CRIM 700

3 credits

Crime, Criminals, Victims, and the Criminal Justice System

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program

This is a foundations course which will critically examine the goals, structure, and practices of the criminal justice system in terms of its capacity to respond to the problems of crime and criminals, and the needs of victims and the community. Attention will be given to what we can learn from criminal justice systems, initiatives, and best practices internationally from a historical perspective. Special attention will be given to our approach to current, emerging, and long-standing problems in the Canadian criminal justice system.

CRIM 705

3 credits

Policy Analysis and Social Justice

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to examine major issues in the field of policy analysis within a framework of social justice. Students will develop an understanding of a variety of policy and analysis models and major analytical activities including the examination of the social, political, historical, and economic context within which policy alternatives are assessed; the identification and mapping of interest group and stakeholder dynamics; and the application of efficacy criteria to policy options. Students will examine the foundational role that problem construction plays in policy development and analysis. The course will bridge the theoretical and conceptual components of policy analysis with practical applications of the techniques.

CRIM 710

3 credits

Change Management in the Criminal Justice System

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program

This course will focus on the application of systems theory, and the principles and theories of change to the management of criminal justice systems. Attention will be give to challenges in implementing change, why certain policies and practices seem resistant to change, and the role of activism and leadership in creating change. Students will learn how to anticipate, plan, implement, and evaluate change. They will also learn how to write and present a change management plan. There will be a focus on change and future trends throughout the course.

CRIM 730

3 credits

Ethical and Legal Issues in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program

The emphasis of this course will be on professional (applied) ethics within the field of criminal justice and as such will focus on how practitioners ought to treat others within the context of their respective vocations. To ground the discussion, the connection between the idea of morality and theories of ethics will be explored, along with the progressively dominant role that law is currently playing in professional ethics. At the same time, there will be an analysis of contemporary issues, both ethical and legal, that are especially relevant in the criminal justice professions. The objective is that students, from both moral and legal points of view, will be able to justify positions taken on ethical dilemmas and problems that they are likely to face within their chosen professions.

CRIM 745

3 credits

Human Resource Administration

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program

This course focuses on issues in personnel management relating to job analysis, performance appraisal, productivity assessment, compensation, recruitment, selection, promotion, career development, disciplinary systems and civil liability, collective bargaining agreements and other labour management matters.

CRIM 755

3 credits

Selected Topics in Criminal Justice

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program.

This course critically reviews topics in advanced theory, methods, and research in criminal justice. Topics will vary with instructor.

CRIM 765

3 credits

Crime and Intelligence Analysis for Crime Reduction

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program

This course deals with outcomes and the precursors to crimes, and provides a foundation for crime reduction concepts and methodology. Crime analysis uses multi-disciplinary and scientific methodology to reduce crime and victimization. Crime analysis includes ideas and concepts from geography, psychology, mathematics, epidemiology (the study of how disease spreads), economics, and other schools of knowledge. Using these concepts, this course gives students a foundation of thirty-nine key skills to accomplish crime analysis to derive practical responses to crime, situational crime prevention, and choosing responses to crime that are likely to be implemented. The course also gives students an understanding of intelligence analysis and the role of intelligence analysts. Intelligence analysis uses sophisticated software, data sources, informants, and observations to draw linkages across events, people, places, and times to determine offence patterns and relationships among offenders.

CRIM 775

3 credits

Contemporary Initiatives in the Criminal Justice System

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program.

This course examines and critiques salient and current critical issues affecting the criminal justice system, public policy and recent social developments. Students will be challenged to understand the various methods of addressing current issues and innovations in criminal justice systems, address those issues in both a constructive and analytical approach, and recommend and defend new policies, practices, and procedures

CRIM 785

3 credits

Methods of Research and Evaluation

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program.

This course will provide students with an understanding of quantitative and qualitative research, and the field of program evaluation. The principles of research methodology and program evaluation will be examined, such as data collection, research designs, logic models, and process monitoring. Students will develop the skills to critically evaluate published research and design evaluation studies.

CRIM 790

5 credits

MA Major Paper

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice program and completion of all coursework

The major paper provides students with an opportunity to submit an original piece of research based on a student’s interests. In this course, students work with a supervisor to complete a major paper. The focus of the course is on introducing and framing an issue in criminal justice and conducting a literature review related to the major paper topic, make recommendations, and/or draw conclusions. Following the completion of the major paper, students will present their work to their cohort and an external reviewer.

CRIM 799

8 credits

Thesis

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the MA Criminal Justice & completion of all coursework

The thesis provides students with an opportunity to design, conduct, and submit an original piece of research based on a student’s interests. In this course students work with a supervisory committee to complete a thesis. The focus of the course is on introducing and framing a research problem, conducting a literature review related to the thesis topic, and collecting and analyzing data in order to present findings, make recommendations, and draw conclusions. Following completion of the thesis, students will defend their work before an examination committee.

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