Academic Calendar Fall 2017

English

Students who achieve a C+ in English 12 or English Literature 12 satisfy the prerequisite for ENGL 105. For prerequisites for other first year English courses, please refer to individual course listings.

Students lacking specific prerequisites for the 100-level English courses may take the Composition Placement Test (CPT). This assessment will assist in the placement, as well as selection, of an appropriate level of English. Students achieving a score of 48 on the CPT may enter any of the 100-level English courses. Students achieving a score of 41-47 should register for ENGL 099.

Students achieving less than 41, and whose first language is English should contact the Upgrading and University Preparatory (UUP) department for appropriate placement.

Students achieving less than 41, and whose first language is not English should contact the English as a Second Language (ESL) department for appropriate placement.

Note: An LPI score of 30/40 (Level 5) on the essay section is considered equivalent to a CPT score of 48; a score of 24-26 (Level 4) is equivalent to a CPT score of 41.

For Literature in Translation courses, please see RUSS 251, 252, 351, and 352.


English language proficiency requirements

Students registering in post-secondary level courses (numbered 100 to 499) will be required to meet the English language entrance proficiency requirements. Students in ELS or the University Foundations programs can register in those courses identified in the University Foundations program with lower levels of language proficiency.

Please note that not all courses are offered every semester.

ENGL 052

1.5 credits

Fundamental-Level English III

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 043 or UUP department permission (assessment may be required)

This course is designed to develop fundamental reading, writing, oral communication, and learning skills. It focuses on the development of reading fluency and the expansion of reading, listening, and speaking vocabulary. In addition, students will begin to develop paragraph writing skills and basic oral communication skills for classroom and workplace settings. Students will be introduced to study skills and classroom learning techniques to help them become independent learners.

Note: English 052 is not designed for English as a second language students.

ENGL 053

1.5 credits

Fundamental English Level IV

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 052 or UUP department permission (assessment may be required)

This course is designed to build on the reading, writing, oral communication, and learning skills introduced in ENGL 052. It focuses on increasing reading fluency and expanding reading, listening, and speaking vocabulary. Students will expand their paragraph writing skills, as well as the oral communication skills required in classroom and workplace settings. In addition, students will develop the study and learning techniques necessary for independent learning.

Note: ENGL 053 is not designed for English as a second language students.

ENGL 062

1.5 credits

Fundamental-Level English V

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 051, ENGL 053, or UUP department permission (assessment may be required).

This course develops skills and strategies for reading and responding to a variety of written materials. Students will also develop basic paragraph writing, oral communication, and critical thinking skills.

Note: ENGL 062 is not designed for English as a second language students.

ENGL 063

1.5 credits

Fundamental-Level English VI

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 062 or UUP department permission (assessment may be required).

This course further develops skills and strategies for reading and analyzing a variety of written materials, including short stories and poetry. Students will expand on sentence structure and paragraph writing skills developed in ENGL 062. They will also strengthen oral communication and critical thinking skills.

Note: ENGL 063 is not designed for English as a second language students.

ENGL 071

3 credits

Intermediate English

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: ENGL 063, English 10 with a C- or better, Communications 11 with a C or better, Communications 12 with a C- or better, LPI essay score of 18-23 (level 3), or UUP department permission (assessment may be required).

This course develops proficiency in reading comprehension, paragraph composition, vocabulary development, sentence variety, grammar, punctuation, spelling, study skills, critical thinking, and interpersonal communication skills. An introduction to essay writing is included. This course is not designed for English as a Second Language students.

ENGL 081

3 credits

Advanced English

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 071, English 10 with a C+ or better, English 11 with a C or better, English 12 with a C or better, Communications 12 with a B or better, LPI essay score of 24 or higher (level 4), CPT score of 41 or better, or ESL WG 74 with a C+ or better.

This university preparatory course develops in-depth skills in the writing process, reading, critical thinking, literary analysis, research, grammar, and oral communications. Emphasis is placed on developing essay writing and research skills. Completion of English 081 with a C+ or better satisfies the prerequisite requirement for English 105.

ENGL 090

3 credits

Technical and Professional English

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 081, English 11, a CPT Score of 41 or better, LPI essay score of 24 or higher (level 4), ESL WG 74 with a C+ or better, or UUP Department permission (assessment may be required).

This university preparatory course helps students develop the reading, writing, research, and analysis skills required for success in post-secondary courses. Development of academic and professional writing skills is a major component of this course. In addition, students will evaluate and analyze writing in a variety of genres. Technical and Professional English 090 is equivalent to Technical and Professional Communications 12 and satisfies the Grade 12 English requirement of the B.C. Adult Graduation Diploma (adult secondary completion).

ENGL 091

3 credits

Provincial English

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 081, English 11 with a C or better, English 12 with a C- or better, English 099, LPI essay score of 24 or higher (level 4), CPT score of 41 or better, or UUP department permission (assessment may be required).

This university preparatory course introduces students to fiction, poetry, and drama at the Grade 12 level, preparing them for the challenges of post-secondary English courses. Development of essay-writing skills is a major component of this course. This course satisfies the Grade 12 English requirement of the B.C. Adult Graduation Diploma (adult secondary completion). Completion of this course with a C+ or better satisfies the prerequisite requirement for ENGL 105.

ENGL 099

1.5 credits

Pre-University Composition

Prerequisite(s): One of the following:
English 12 or English Literature 12 with a grade of C- or better;
UFV ENGL 081 or 091 with a grade of C or better;
UFV ESL WG74 with a grade of C+ or better;
CPT score of 41 or better;
LPI minimum score of 24-26 or level 4 in the essay section.

This is a pre-college composition course designed to prepare students for the writing requirements of college and university level courses.
Note: Students may not take CMNS 099 for further credit.

ENGL 104

3 credits

Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction, Poetry, and Drama

Prerequisite(s): None

This course teaches fundamental techniques and strategies of creative writing in the three genres of fiction, poetry, and drama. Students practice writing in these genres and learn to critique writing in a cooperative workshop setting.

ENGL 105

3 credits

Academic Writing

Prerequisite(s): English 12 or English Literature 12 with a minimum final grade of C+ or better; UFV CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better; UFV ENGL 081 or 091 with a grade of C+ or better; UFV ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better; a minimum grade of C- in a university level English or Communications course; CPT score of 48 or better; LPI score of 30 (level 5); TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE or essay score of 4.0; or IBT score of 88, with no section below 20; MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery) score of at least 85; CAEL (Canadian Academic English Language) score of at least 70; CanTEST score of at least 4.5 in both Listening and Reading and a score of 4.0 in Writing; Cambridge Proficiency Examination – competence level of C; IELTS (International English Language Testing System) score of at least 6.5 with no band less than 6.0; UFV English as a Second Language assessment results equivalent to completion of the 80-level of UFVs ESL writing and grammar.

This course helps you understand and develop university-level writing and reading practices which will serve you in any academic discipline. You will analyze writing and writing situations, critically think about writing, and develop and present ideas in essays.

ENGL 108

3 credits

Introduction to Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 12 or English Literature 12 with a final grade of B or better; CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better; ENGL 081 or ENGL 091 with a grade of C+ or better; ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better; CPT score of 48 or better; LPI minimum score of 30/40 or level 5 in the essay section; a minimum of C- in a university-level English or Communications course; or TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE (Essay) score of 4.0 or TOEFL IBT score of 88, with no section below 20.

This course will introduce students to the three major literary genres — poetry, drama, and prose fiction—and will provide them with a critical vocabulary for analyzing and interpreting works of literature. The three genres will receive approximately equal coverage during the course. Each genre will be represented by texts from a range of literary periods and national literatures. The course will involve a mixture of lectures, class discussions, and workshops.

ENGL 109

3 credits

Introduction to the English Language

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 12 or English Literature 12 with a final grade of B or better; CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better; ENGL 081 or ENGL 091 with a grade of C+ or better; ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better; CPT score of 48 or better; LPI minimum score of 30/40 or level 5 in the essay section; a minimum of C- in a university-level English or Communications course; or TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE (Essay) score of 4.0 or TOEFL IBT score of 88, with no section below 20.

English 109 approaches the introductory study of the English language with three principal objectives in mind. Students will acquire an elementary vocabulary for the analysis of word-formation and semantics, gain a basic knowledge of the origin and development of Present Day English vocabulary, and explore critical approaches to the use and abuse of the language as they experience it in their daily lives. While the course is intended to engage the non-specialist student with no previous exposure to the study of language, it lays a foundation for subsequent study not only of the structure and history of English, but of composition and rhetoric, as well as linguistics.

ENGL 115

3 credits

Great Books: The Western Tradition in Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 12 or English Literature 12 with a final grade of B or better; CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better; ENGL 081 or ENGL 091 with a grade of C+ or better; ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better; CPT score of 48 or better; LPI minimum score of 30/40 or level 5 in the essay section; a minimum of C- in a university-level English or Communications course; or TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE (Essay) score of 4.0 or TOEFL IBT score of 88, with no section below 20.

This course will introduce students to works of literature in the western literary canon. Students will need a representative selection of writing from the classical world, the middle ages, the renaissance, the eighteenth, and the nineteenth centuries.

ENGL 120

3 credits

Introduction to Fiction

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 12 or English Literature 12 with a final grade of B or better; CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better; ENGL 081 or ENGL 091 with a grade of C+ or better; ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better; CPT score of 48 or better; LPI minimum score of 30/40 or level 5 in the essay section; a minimum of C- in a university-level English or Communications course; or TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE (Essay) score of 4.0 or TOEFL IBT score of 88, with no section below 20.

This course explores the diversity of fiction as it appears in the short story, novella, and novel. Students will develop a critical awareness of formal elements such as plot, setting, character, point of view, conflict, symbolism, and theme. A further component of the course is learning to write critically about fiction.

ENGL 130

3 credits

Introduction to Drama

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 12 or English Literature 12 with a final grade of B or better; CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better; ENGL 081 or ENGL 091 with a grade of C+ or better; ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better; CPT score of 48 or better; LPI minimum score of 30/40 or level 5 in the essay section; a minimum of C- in a university-level English or Communications course; or TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE (Essay) score of 4.0 or TOEFL IBT score of 88, with no section below 20.

This course explores diverse plays. Students will develop a critical awareness of thematic concerns of drama as well as its formal elements such as plot, point of attack, conflict, objective, imagery, and setting. A further component of the course is learning to write critically about literature. This is not an acting course.

ENGL 150

3 credits

Introduction to Poetry

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 12 or English Literature 12 with a final grade of B or better; CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better; ENGL 081 or ENGL 091 with a grade of C+ or better; ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better; CPT score of 48 or better; LPI minimum score of 30/40 or level 5 in the essay section; a minimum of C- in a university-level English or Communications course; or TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE (Essay) score of 4.0 or TOEFL IBT score of 88, with no section below 20.

By studying a wide range of poetry, students will develop a critical awareness of theme as well as the formal elements of poetry such as structure, figures of speech, and scansion. A further component of the course is learning to write critically about literature.

ENGL 170

3 credits

Literature in Context

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: English 12 or English Literature 12 with a final grade of B or better; CMNS 099 or ENGL 099 with a grade of C or better; ENGL 081 or ENGL 091 with a grade of C+ or better; ESL WG84 with a grade of C+ or better; CPT score of 48 or better; LPI minimum score of 30/40 or level 5 in the essay section; a minimum of C- in a university-level English or Communications course; or TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 570 or better (or 230 if computer-based score), plus a minimum TWE (Essay) score of 4.0 or TOEFL IBT score of 88, with no section below 20.

This course centres on specific themes or cultural fields of study that will vary with the instructor. Areas of interest may include the diasporic literatures, aboriginal cultures, gay, lesbian, and bisexual writings, and period or theme-based studies. The course will feature literary texts drawn from various genres, but may also include historical narratives and documents, films, videos, or visual art displays.

ENGL 200

3 credits

Introduction to Literary Critical Methods

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in ENGL 105).

This course will focus on strategies for reading literature and writing literary critical essays. The course will include instruction in the conventions of the literary essay, and students will be guided in reading and writing about the three major genres: fiction, poetry, and drama.

ENGL 204

3 credits

Medieval English Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course is a survey of major authors, works, and genres in Old and Middle English literature. Students will gain an elementary knowledge of Middle English and explore the religious, social, and ethical concerns of medieval writers.

ENGL 205

3 credits

Early Modern English Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course is a survey of major authors, works, and genres in English from Wyatt to Milton. Students will explore how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century writers used popular and literary traditions and forms to address the dramatic social, economic, and cultural transformations of the early modern period.

ENGL 206

3 credits

The Long Eighteenth Century

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

The course will survey key works of literature in English from 1660 to 1830 in their cultural-historical context.

ENGL 207

3 credits

Victorian and Modern Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course is a survey of English literature from 1830 to 1930. Students will explore how Victorian and Modern writers used popular and literary traditions and forms to address the dramatic social, economic, and cultural transformations of their respective periods.

ENGL 208

3 credits

Creative Writing: Screenwriting

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any 100-level literature course ENGL 108 or higher.

This course is an introductory workshop in the fundamental techniques and principles of screenwriting in various styles, including dramatic, experimental, and documentary. Students will complete several short assignments, as well as one 8-10 page script.

Note: Students with credit for ENGL 111 cannot take this course for further credit.

ENGL 209

3 credits

The Structure of the English Language

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in ENGL 105).

This course introduces students to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Modern English. While the course will focus on a descriptive approach to linguistic analysis, it will also examine issues of meaning and usage, with particular reference to Canadian English.

ENGL 210

3 credits

The Art of the Essay

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (two 100-level ENGL courses ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in ENGL 105) or (CMNS 125 and CMNS 251) or (CMNS 155 and CMNS 251). Note: As of January 2018, prerequisites will change to one of the following: (two 100-level ENGL courses ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in ENGL 105).

Advanced methods, approaches and concepts of critical essay writing. Building on skills acquired in introductory writing courses, this course covers non-fiction prose genres, in both academic and non-academic contexts.

ENGL 211

3 credits

Creative Writing: PlayWriting

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any first year literature course numbered ENGL 108 or higher.

This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of play-writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established playwrights are studied as models. Students produce their own dramatic writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom discussion.

ENGL 212

3 credits

Creative Writing: Fiction

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any first year literature course numbered ENGL 108 or higher

This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of short fiction writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established writers are studied as models. Students produce their own writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom discussion.

ENGL 213

3 credits

Creative Writing: Poetry

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any first-year literature course numbered ENGL 108 or higher

This course is an introduction to the creative process and techniques of poetry writing. It is a writing intensive course. Works by established writers are studied as models. Students produce their own writing which is then critiqued by the instructor and classmates in classroom discussion.

ENGL 214

3 credits

Writing and Rhetorical Theory

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in ENGL 105).

Students study rhetorical theory from classical and modern times to apply it in present-day situations. Students will understand writing as a tool, and rhetoric as concerned with the production and use of writing in various contexts. This course will focus on literacy, figurative language, and the ethics and teaching of writing.

ENGL 215

3 credits

Creative Writing: Creative Non-Fiction

Prerequisite(s): Any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 104 or higher.

This workshop course offers a comprehensive introduction to the crafting of creative non-fiction, including such forms as travel writing, memoir, nature writing, reviewing, personal essays, literary aesthetics, and cultural criticism.

ENGL 216

3 credits

Introduction to Shakespeare

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level ENGL courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course introduces students to Shakespeare’s works at the second-year level, with detailed attention to his language, thought, and cultural context. Students will read a selection of Shakespeare’s plays and poetry.

ENGL 220

3 credits

Development of the British Novel

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course surveys the history of the British novel, with emphasis on its origins in the 18th century. Literary analysis will be complemented by historical context, as well as the history of scholarship on the novel.

ENGL 225

3 credits

Classical Literature in Translation

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course studies some of the most influential literature written in Greek and/or Latin from the period of Homer to the period of Virgil and Ovid.

ENGL 226

3 credits

Renaissance Literature in Translation

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

TThis course examines the literature of the European Renaissance, from roughly 1350 to 1650. Students will study new and influential models of literature such as the sonnet, Renaissance drama, Renaissance epic, humanist letters and essays, the novella, prose romance, and the early novel.

ENGL 227

3 credits

European Literature in Translation: Romanticism to Modernism

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course surveys key authors and literary trends from Romanticism to Modernism in continental Europe. Students will compare the literature of two or more different linguistic, cultural, or national groups such as French, German, Russian, Italian, and/or Spanish in translation.

ENGL 228

3 credits

Topics in Aboriginal Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course will examine significant Aboriginal texts from a range of genres and traditions, and will focus on specific themes such as the oral tradition, the experience of Aboriginal women, colonialism/decolonization, and the literature of resistance.

ENGL 233

3 credits

History of Theatre and Drama: Antiquity to 1642

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (THEA 101 and one 100-level ENGL course numbered ENGL 105 or higher), or (two 100-level ENGL courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher), or (B or better in THEA 101), or (B or better in one 100-level ENGL course numbered ENGL 105 or higher).

This course explores the evolution and diversity of theatre and drama from Antiquity to 1642. It investigates the development and significance of a range of theatre forms and dramatic genres from different historical periods, which might include Greek tragedy, Roman comedy, Sanskrit theatre, Medieval drama, Japanese Noh, and Elizabethan tragedy and comedy. This course may involve field trips to see plays in the Lower Mainland.

Note: This course is offered as THEA 203 and ENGL 233. Students may take only one of these for credit.

Note: Students with credit for THEA 202 cannot take this course for further credit.

ENGL 234

3 credits

History of Theatre and Drama: 1642 to 1914

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (THEA 101 and one 100-level ENGL course numbered ENGL 105 or higher), or (two 100-level ENGL courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher), or (B or better in THEA 101), or (B or better in one 100-level ENGL course numbered ENGL 105 or higher).

This course explores the evolution and diversity of theatre and drama from 1642 to 1914. It investigates the development and significance of a range of theatre forms and dramatic genres from different historical periods, which might include Restoration comedy, Neoclassical tragedy, Kabuki, Kathakali, Chinese opera, melodrama, and Realism. This course may involve field trips to plays in the Lower Mainland.

Note: This course is offered as THEA 204 and ENGL 234. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 240

3 credits

An Introduction to Canadian Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course introduces students to the rich variety of Canadian literature in English. From narratives by early European explorers to contemporary fiction, drama, and poetry, the course examines how the experiences and values of Canadians have evolved. Students will consider the role of Indigenous peoples in the shaping of Canada.

ENGL 245

3 credits

Introduction to South Asian Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course examines South Asian fiction, written in English, within its social and historical contexts. The emphasis will be on literature from the Indian subcontinent’s British, American, and particularly Canadian diasporas. Course materials may include influential works in non-fiction genres (e.g. autobiographies, essays, film).

ENGL 267

3 credits

Signs and Meaning: An Introduction to Semiotics

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170; FILM 110 or 120; MACS 110, 130, or 221; or AH 200 or 205.

This course is an introduction to the specialized language and concepts of semiotics, which offers students a useful approach for the critical examination of literature, film, visual arts, and media. By the end of the term, students will perform their own semiotic analysis of a text, film, work of art, or popular media.
Note: This course is offered as ENGL 267, MACS 267, and AH 267. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 270

3 credits

Topics in Popular Fiction

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course is a literary study of selected fictional genres popularized in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and/or twentieth centuries.

Note: The specific genre of study is denoted with a letter designation (i.e. ENGL 270C). Students may take ENGL 270 twice for credit as long as the letter designation differs, but may not take it more than twice to meet English major, minor, or extended minor requirements.

ENGL 275

3 credits

Literature and Ecology

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level ENGL courses numbered ENGL 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course examines writing that explores the nature and origins of our contemporary environmental challenges. Topics may include the Romantic response to the Industrial and Agrarian Revolutions, literary portraits of the Canadian wild, current "ecological poetics" and eco-feminism, and the evolution of "green" criticism.

ENGL 280

3 credits

Children's Literature

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: (any two 100-level English courses numbered 105 or higher) or (B or better in one of the following: ENGL 108, 115, 120, 130, 150, or 170).

This course introduces students to the major periods and genres of children’s literature from the folk and fairy tales to the present day. The course will focus on major authors and themes in children’s literature, including images of childhood.

ENGL 293

3 credits

Literature in Music History

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 plus any other 100-level English course or 100-level Music course.

This course is designed for students with interests in music, music education, comparative literature, history, and religious studies. The focus is on music composed in western Europe for a variety of social settings from the cathedral to the drawing room, the opera house, and the concert hall. Students will listen to classical music as well as read works of literature for the purpose of understanding how they have influenced music history.
Note: This course is offered as MUSC 203 and ENGL 293. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 294

3 credits

Opera and Literature

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 plus any other 100-level English course or 100-level Music course.

This interdisciplinary course is designed for students with interests in comparative literature, music, music education, and drama. It will consider how operas reflect the social, political, and cultural transformation of Europe from the seventeenth to twentieth century. Students listen to and watch recorded opera performances and examine the literary, musical, dramatic, and social dimensions of the operatic form.
Note: This course is offered as MUSC 204 and ENGL 294. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 298

3 credits

Special Topics in Creative Writing

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 105 and any other 100-level ENGL course numbered 108 or higher.

This course looks at a specific literary genre of the instructor’s choice. It is a writing intensive workshop-style course. Students will study works by established writers as models for their own writing.

ENGL 301

4 credits

Homer, Classicism, and English Literary History

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course is specifically designed to introduce students of English literature to the influence of Homer and other classical authors on the development of the English literary tradition.

ENGL 302

4 credits

Creative Writing: Advanced Short Fiction

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses to include one of the following: ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213, or 215.

This course explores short fiction at an advanced level. Students will produce short fiction which will then be workshopped and redrafted. Students will study examples of the genre by professional authors. By the end of the term, students will have produced a substantial portfolio.

ENGL 303

4 credits

Creative Writing: Historical Fiction

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses to include one of the following: ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213, or 215.

Historical fiction combines traditional fiction elements with historical research. Students will experiment with the elements of historical fiction to produce their own writing samples, which will be critiqued by the instructor and classmates in workshops. Students will study examples of the genre by viewing works by professional authors.

ENGL 304

4 credits

Topics in Medieval literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course examines a significant theme or topic in medieval literature, such as the Heroic Age, medieval love, or Arthurian romance. Typically, course materials include works in a variety of genres.

ENGL 306

4 credits

Chaucer

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course is a survey of Chaucer’s poetry from his early courtly poetry to his unfinished masterpiece, The Canterbury Tales. Students will learn to read Chaucer in the original Middle English and to appreciate the diversity of medieval genres in his poetry.

ENGL 308

4 credits

Early Modern Poetry and Prose

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

ocusing on English poetry and prose from 1500-1700, students will study Renaissance genres such as the Petrarchan sonnet and its analogues, the epic, the lyric, the prose romance, the novella, and religious and political essays and sermons.

ENGL 309

4 credits

Topics in Renaissance Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

This course addresses various topics in Renaissance literature and culture. Examples include early modern women’s writing, race, trade and travel, or gender and sexuality. The course may focus on an author or group of authors other than Shakespeare.

ENGL 310

4 credits

Early Modern Drama

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

A survey of English dramatic productions from the early modern period, excluding Shakespeare’s plays. Playwrights may include Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Dekker, Middleton, Cary, Webster, Ford, and Behn. The course may cover plays for “private” theatres, court masques, and closet or coterie drama.

ENGL 311

4 credits

Creative Writing: Novel

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses, to include one of the following: ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213, or 215.

This course further explores fiction writing, specifically the creative and formal elements of the novel. Students experiment with novel writing elements to produce their own writing, which will be critiqued by the instructor and classmates in a workshop setting.

ENGL 312

4 credits

Shakespeare

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course examines a representative sample of Shakespeare's plays selected from the "genres" of the works as they have been traditionally divided and performed.

ENGL 313

4 credits

Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses to include one of the following: ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213 or 215.

This course explores poetry at an advanced level. Students will produce poetry which will be workshopped and redrafted. Students will study examples of the genre by professional authors. By the end of the term, students will have produced a substantial portfolio.

ENGL 315

4 credits

Creative Writing: Children's Literature

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses to include one of the following: ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213, or 215.

This writing course details the elements specific to the genre of children’s literature. Samples of popular children’s literature will be used as models. As a writing-intensive course, students will learn techniques to produce successful children's literature in several genres. Writing produced in the class will be critiqued in a workshop setting. Special emphasis will be placed on learning the skill of constructive critical analysis of new writing.

ENGL 316

4 credits

Milton

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

The poetry and prose of John Milton will be examined.

ENGL 317

4 credits

Creative Writing: Topics in Contemporary & Experimental Poetics

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses to include one of the following: ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213, or 215.

Contemporary and experimental poetics engages with the question of how writers think, in addition to how experimental forms in modern, avant-garde, and contemporary writing can inspire students to understand their own creative potential.

ENGL 318

4 credits

Major Authors of the Restoration and Early 18th Century

Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses

This course provides a focused look at major figures of Anglo-Irish literature from 1660 to 1750, emphasizing dominant genres of the time such as poetry and the essay. Writers studied include Aphra Behn, John Dryden, Alexander Pope, and Jonathan Swift.

ENGL 319

4 credits

The Eighteenth-Century Novel

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

The course will introduce students to the birth and early development of the English novel through such writers as Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, and Sterne.

ENGL 321

4 credits

The Later Eighteenth Century, 1750-1800

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

The second half of the eighteenth century was a period of intellectual and political ferment across Europe, and it ushered in the major change in sensibility known as Romanticism. This course examines representative poems, essays, and works of fiction in British literature from 1750 to 1800 that reveal the depth and extent of the transition from the Neoclassical to Romantic era.

ENGL 323

4 credits

Special Topics in Romanticism

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

This course approaches the English Romantic period from a variety of perspectives that varies with the instructor. Studies might, for example, focus on the Romantic ode, madness and the Romantic imagination, the Politics of English Romanticism, or Romantic women.

ENGL 325

4 credits

British Romanticism, 1780-1830

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

A survey of literature published in England during the Romantic period, with emphasis on the poetry and poetics of Romanticism. Representative novels, essays, and other genres will also be studied.

ENGL 331

4 credits

Victorian Poetry and Poetic Theory

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

This course will examine the poetry and poetic theory of the Victorian era, 1830-1900. Representative works by Tennyson, Arnold, the Brownings, the Rossettis, and Hopkins will be studied in relation to the aesthetics of Mill, Arnold, Ruskin, Pater, Buchanan, and Symons.

ENGL 333

4 credits

Nineteenth-Century British Novelists

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course will explore novels written by such major authors as Austen, Scott, Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Trollope, the Brontes, George Eliot, Hardy, and George Gissing.

ENGL 335

4 credits

Topics in Victorian Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

This course approaches the poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and/or art of the Victorian period from a perspective chosen by the instructor.

ENGL 336

4 credits

British and Anglo-Irish Fiction, 1880-1930

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

Some of the major British and Anglo-Irish fiction writers -- Thomas Hardy, George Gissing, Joseph Conrad, E.M. Forster, Ford Maddox Ford, Katherine Mansfield, D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce -- will be studied.

ENGL 338

4 credits

Studies in Modernism

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course offers a survey of international modernism through literary texts of various genres drawn from the late 19th to mid-20th century. The aim of the course is to present major issues, key authors, and important themes in modernist literature.

ENGL 339

4 credits

British and Irish Fiction Since 1930

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

This course examines what has happened in British and Irish fiction since modernism. While much has changed under the influence of such forces as postmodernism, postcolonialism, and devolution, there has also been continuity: British and Irish novelists continue to write in such familiar modes as realism, social comedy, and historical fiction. In this course, you will have an opportunity to read a range of authors, and to consider how their works reflect both the traditions of the novel and the radically altered cultural landscape of contemporary Britain and Ireland.

ENGL 340

4 credits

British and Irish Poetry Since 1930

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

British and Irish poets of the last seventy-five years tend to be overshadowed by their great Modernist predecessors. But in the decades since 1930, there have been a number of gifted and productive poets at work. This course will provide an opportunity to study poems by such writers as W.H. Auden, Dylan Thomas, Patrick Kavanagh, Carol Ann Duffy, Philip Larkin, Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney, John Lennon, Medbh McGuckian, and Linton Kwesi Johnson.

ENGL 341

4 credits

Topics in Contemporary British and Irish Studies

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course examines a significant theme or topic in contemporary British studies, ranging from broad cultural concerns such as immigration and devolution to more specifically literary topics such as historical drama, elegy, or postmodernism.

ENGL 344

4 credits

American Literature 1620-1860

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course is a survey of major American authors from the Colonial era to the eve of the Civil War. Authors covered may include Edward Taylor, Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Washington Irving, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglas, Edgar Allen Poe and Walt Whitman. Topics covered may include the Puritan influence on American culture; race and slavery; the American Gothic; and Transcendentalism.

ENGL 348

4 credits

American Literature 1865-1910

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course offers a survey of American authors from the Civil War to the eve of World War I. Authors covered may include Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Henry James, Theodore Dreiser, Kate Chopin, and Frank Norris. Topics covered may include realism and naturalism in fiction; responses to industrialization and urbanization; the Gothic; and women's experience.

ENGL 349

4 credits

Topics in American Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course offers theme-based special topics in American literature. The focus of the course will vary with the instructor and need not be based on any particular period or confined to specific genres. Topics may include particular philosophical influences on American literature such as that of Puritan theology;styles like naturalism or realism; or diasporic studies such as that of African American literary culture.

ENGL 350

4 credits

American Literature 1900-1945

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course will feature a selection of poetry, fiction, and drama from the American modernist period. Topics may include formal experiments of the avant garde, responses to historical events such as World War I and World War II, and/or social geographies like those of Indigenous and African American people.

ENGL 352

4 credits

American Literature of World War II and After

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

This course will survey such topics as the emergence of an ecological consciousness; feminist, postcolonial, or race-related themes; or social geographies such as those of Indigenous, Latino, and African-American people.

ENGL 354

4 credits

Canadian Poetry and Prose, Beginnings to 1920

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course examines selected works by early Canadian writers, from its beginnings to the First World War. These texts introduce a variety of themes that have remained significant in Canadian studies: the impact of settlement on the wilderness, imperial loyalties, and relations with Indigenous peoples.

ENGL 356

4 credits

Modern Canadian Prose

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course examines prose written in Canada from 1920 up to the present. Course readings are predominantly fiction – novels and short stories – but may include works in other prose genres, such as memoir and autobiography.

ENGL 358

4 credits

Modern Canadian Poetry

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course examines selected works of Canadian poetry. The course readings range from the work of early twentieth-century poets such as EJ Pratt and FR Scott up to contemporary poetry by writers such as Don McKay and Anne Carson.

ENGL 360

4 credits

Topics in Canadian Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course examines a significant theme or topic in Canadian literature such as the North, World War I, urbanization, or social protest. Typically, course materials include works in a variety of genres.

ENGL 361

4 credits

Canadian Drama

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course offers a literary study of Canadian drama. Play selections will represent the history and diversity of Canadian drama, including the work of Indigenous and other minority playwrights. Students may be required to attend and analyze live performances.

ENGL 362

4 credits

Literature of British Columbia

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course surveys the literature of British Columbia from its beginnings to the present. It examines such themes as the wilderness, urbanization, indigeneity, and multiculturalism. Course readings may include works in a variety of genres.

ENGL 363

4 credits

Autobiography

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course will study influential autobiographical works from classical times to the present day. Attention will be given to the formal characteristics of the genre and its relationship to the personal and cultural formation of the self.

ENGL 364

4 credits

History and Principles of Literary Criticism

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 264 and one 300-level English course OR any two 300-level English courses

This course explores a selection of major critical statements about literature, ranging from the Greek classics to Renaissance, romantic, and early modern constructions of the literary text. Topics may include the social and aesthetic function of literature as it has been variously conceived; the formal or philosophical parameters of the major genres; or the politics of criticism itself.

ENGL 365

4 credits

History of Theatre and Drama: 1914 to the Present

Prerequisite(s): THEA 203 and THEA 204; or one of THEA 203 or THEA 204, plus one 200-level course in ENGL; or two 200-level courses in ENGL.

This course explores the evolution and diversity of theatre, drama, and performance from 1914 to the present, investigating major trends and issues in theatre and drama and their significance within the context of larger cultural and historical changes. This course may involve fieldtrips to plays in the Lower Mainland.

Note: This course is offered as THEA 301 and ENGL 365. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 366

4 credits

Studies in Critical Approaches to Literature

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 264 and one 300-level English course OR any two 300-level English courses

This course surveys major critical statements and schools of criticism in twentieth century and contemporary literary theory. Areas of concentration may be selected from psychoanalytical theory, Marxism, feminism, structuralism and poststructuralism, postcolonial theory, new historicism, reader response theory, or affect theory.

ENGL 367

4 credits

Culture and Theory of Diaspora

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits

This seminar course investigates the phenomenon of diaspora in modern, postcolonial, and global contexts. Examining an interdisciplinary literature from the social sciences and humanities, students will become familiar with the social features of diaspora and the cultural expression of the diasporic condition through a consideration of theoretical, literary, and ethnographic texts. Particular attention will be given to the local nuances of diaspora in Canada and Europe.
Note: This course is offered as ANTH 367 and ENGL 367. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 368

4 credits

Topics in Drama

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

This course examines selected dramatic works which are organized around a single topic. The topic might be a theme such as theatre of social protest, a form or genre such as theatre of the absurd, a region such as Anglo-Irish drama, or a critical approach such as performance theory. Attendance at a live performance may be required.

ENGL 369

4 credits

Studies in World Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course will offer literatures from around the world with an emphasis on works translated into English. Content may vary in focus from one to many national or ethnic literatures and may include different genres. The objective is to broaden the student’s appreciation of literature and provide opportunity for the featuring of non-Anglo cultures while cultivating the literary critical skills required in all upper-level English courses.
A number of theoretical concepts will be examined with regard to the chosen authors. Course materials may include works in other media and genres (e.g., essays, theatre, and film).

ENGL 370

4 credits

The History of the English Language

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

The course explores the evolution of the English language from its origins in the West Germanic dialects established in England in the seventh century to its present position as an international medium for commerce and technology. Students will examine the linguistic, historical, and social factors that have influenced the language's development. Special attention will be paid to the rise of diverse national and regional variations of English.

ENGL 373

4 credits

Rhetoric: Literary Journalism

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses (ENGL 215 recommended), or any two of the following: 200-level English course (ENGL 215 recommended), CMNS 251, JRNL/CMNS 300.

This advanced writing-intensive course introduces the genre of literary journalism that arises from interdisciplinary, first person reportage methods since the 1960s. Student projects based on models by distinguished practitioners will be critiqued in workshop format by classmates and the instructor. Its engaged, longer-form narrative approach provides an ideal learning bridge to book, journal, script, and online media applications.
Note: This course is also offered as JRNL 373. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 374

4 credits

Rhetoric: Advanced Composition

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course helps already strong writers further build their knowledge about writing, their critical thinking skills, and their ability to write in a scholarly environment within classroom workshops. This course includes self-directed reading of scholarly research in writing studies and responses to peer writing about research.

ENGL 375

4 credits

Rhetoric: Composition Theory

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

Students learn about the field of composition as it emerged from within North American university English departments in the 1960s. The readings and discussion focus on ways composition has been thought of and taught.

ENGL 376

4 credits

Rhetoric: An Historical Survey

Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses

This course introduces students to definitions and roles of rhetoric through the centuries. Readings and discussion in this survey will point to the long-standing connections among language, persuasion and education. The readings cover major periods of rhetoric: Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Twentieth Century.

ENGL 377

4 credits

Creative Writing: Film Adaptations of English Literature

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses to include one of ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213, or 215. FILM 110 or 120 recommended.

This course focuses on practices and theories of film adaptation with the goal that each student will produce several adaptations of shorter and longer scenes from written English fiction. Major emphasis is given to the students' own writing and their ability to apply the adaptation theory to the screenwriting process. Students will analyze selected films as interpretations of their literary sources and discuss techniques for translating literature into film. Emphasis will be on practical application of theoretical concepts. Through discussions, peer review, and critique students will refine their creative writing skills and develop a critical approach to their own writing.

ENGL 378

4 credits

Creative Writing: Advanced Screenwriting

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses to include one of ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213, or 215. One of FILM 110 or 120 recommended.

This course explores screenwriting at an advanced level. Designed to expand on students’ basic screenwriting skills, the course focuses on more complex strategies for developing original characters, dialogue, conflict, and plot structures. It is a writing intensive course. Students will produce samples of screenwriting which will then be workshopped and redrafted. Examples of the genre by professional screenwriters will be analyzed and studied as models. By the end of the term, students will have written one original 15-25 page screenplay as well as one team-written screenplay.

ENGL 379

4 credits

Rhetoric: Composition Teaching

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

Workshops, discussions, and readings teach students how trends in writing ideology and pedagogy, trends in curriculum design, and public attitudes toward composition affect the teaching of writing. This course is of value to prospective teachers.

Note: Students with credit for EDUC 379 cannot take this course for further credit.

ENGL 380

4 credits

Topics in South Asia Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course will introduce students to various aspects of the history and aesthetics of South Asian literature from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and/or Sri Lanka. Covering a broad range of historical, soci-cultural, and/or political contexts, it will explore issues such as empire, race, religion, caste, gender, nation, and class. Content may vary in focus and include different genres.

ENGL 381

4 credits

Creative Writing: Advanced Playwriting

Prerequisite(s): Two 200-level English courses to include one of ENGL 208, 211, 212, 213, or 215. ENGL 211 recommended.

This is a writing-intensive course. Students create and revise writing for the stage as well as constructively critique other students' writing. Classical and contemporary models are studied.

ENGL 382

4 credits

India in English

Prerequisite(s): Any two second-year English courses

This course examines how various “Orientalist” constructions entered into British culture. While the major focus of the course is English fiction about India from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, we may concurrently examine other modes of representation, such as travel writing, journalism, film, architecture, and/or photography. Course readings will also include some theoretical materials that introduce the fundamental terms of postcolonial studies.

ENGL 384

4 credits

Topics in South Asian Diaspora Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses

This course will examine literatures of South Asian diaspora from Canada, Britian, Australia, the United States, and elsewhere. An overview of the South Asian diasporic (migratory) movements - both colonial and postcolonial - will provide the historical, soci-cultural, political, and/or economical context to understatnd the selected literary texts, including novels. plays, poetry, and/or autobiography. Topics for discussion may include home and homeland, nation, migration, identity and belonging, race and racism, empire and colonialism, and movements and restrictions, among others.

ENGL 385

3 credits

Language and Action: Seminar in Contemporary Rhetoric

Prerequisite(s): 60 university-level credits, including one 200-level CMNS or ENGL course.

In this course you will be introduced to and examine major statements on the nature of rhetoric from the classical period to the 21st century; you will then apply these to contemporary rhetorical events in an effort to understand the paradigms governing language use in current social and linguistic environments. Rhetoric always includes study of the ways language serves as a call to action; in this course, the emphasis will be on the ways language acts – in itself, on the user, and on the discourse community.

Note: This course is offered as CMNS 385 and ENGL 385. Students may take only one of these for credit.

ENGL 386

4 credits

Figurative Language

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses.

Students will study figurative language (figures of speech and tropes) by reading key texts in rhetorical and literary theory from Aristotle to the twentieth century, and will assess its significance in poetry and other arts.

ENGL 388

4 credits

Topics in Children's Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 200-level English courses; ENGL 280 recommended

This course examines a significant genre, period, theme, author, or national tradition in children’s literature. For example, the course could focus on the animal story or the “problem novel”; on Victorian children’s literature or twenty-first century bestsellers; on children’s literature about war or the Holocaust; on an individual writer such as Kit Pearson or Michael Morpurgo; or on Canadian or Australian children’s literature.

ENGL 391

4 credits

Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky in English

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: RUSS 251, RUSS 252, or any 200-level English course.

This course focuses on the major works of L.N. Tolstoy and F.M. Dostoyevsky, two of the greatest writers and thinkers of 19th century Russia, whose ideas have influenced the development of modern thought around the world. Their works will be examined as examples of great literature within their social and historical context. Students are expected to have read Anna Karenina and Crime and Punishment before taking this course.

Note: This course is offered as RUSS 391 and ENGL 391. Students may only take one of these for credit. Students with credit for RUSS 351 cannot take this course for further credit.

ENGL 392

4 credits

Bulgakov, Pasternak, and Solzenitsyn

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: RUSS 251, RUSS 252, or any 200-level English course.

This course concentrates on the works, translated into English, of three courageous writers who dared to express ideas that were not acceptable to the Soviet regime. These works will be examined as examples of great literature within their social and historical context.

Note: This course is offered as RUSS 392 and ENGL 392. Students may only take one of these for credit. Students with credit for RUSS 352 cannot take this course for further credit.

ENGL 401

4 credits

Seminar in Rhetoric and Literary Theory

Prerequisite(s): Any two 300-level English courses

This advanced seminar investigates a topic, school of thought, debate, or historical period in Rhetoric or Literary Theory. Students will develop their presentation skills, will engage in in-depth class discussion of the course materials, and will write an independently-researched final paper or project.
Note: The specific focus of study is denoted with a letter designation (i.e. ENGL 401C). Students may take ENGL 401 twice for credit as long as the letter designation differs, but may not take it more than twice to meet English major, minor, or extended minor requirements.

ENGL 403

4 credits

Seminar in Literature

Prerequisite(s): Any two 300-level English courses

This advanced seminar focuses on a period, genre, issue or major author in light of a selected set of theoretical or historical issues. Students will develop their presentation skills, will engage in in-depth class discussion of the course materials, and will write an independently researched final paper.
Note: The specific focus of study is denoted with a letter designation (i.e. ENGL 403C). Students may take ENGL 403 twice for credit as long as the letter designation differs, but may not take it more than twice to meet English major, minor, or extended minor requirements.

ENGL 405

4 credits

Seminar in Creative Writing

Prerequisite(s): Any two 300 level English courses to include one of the following: ENGL 302, 303, 311, 313, 315, 317, 377, 378, 381.

This course allows students to work on individual, advanced creative writing projects. Students engage in genre-based critical discourse, give a presentation on the work of a contemporary author, as well as produce a completed manuscript. Revision is an essential component with students significantly redrafting their work to produce the final project by the end of the course.

ENGL 490

4 credits

Directed Studies in English

Prerequisite(s): Permission to enter requires 45 credits in English and written contract between student and instructor, signed by student, instructor, and department head

This independent study course is designed for upper-level students who wish to pursue in-depth study of an author, genre, period, or topic not otherwise offered.

ENGL 491

4 credits

Honours Directed Reading

Prerequisite(s): (Acceptance to the English Honours program as outlined in the calendar) and (completion of all lower-level course requirements for the English major) and (a minimum of 24 upper-level credits required for the English major).

The first of two courses specific to the English Honours program, this course prepares students to write the research paper or creative writing project through instruction in research techniques and intensive reading in an area of interest to be defined by agreement between students and instructors.

ENGL 492

4 credits

Honours Directed Essay

Prerequisite(s): (Acceptance to the Honours program as outlined in the calendar) and (completion of all lower-level course requirements for the English major) and (a minimum of 24 upper-level credits required for the English major) and (completion of ENGL 491).

The second of two courses specific to the English Honours program, this course will be devoted to the writing of an extended research paper or substantial creative writing project for the student’s BA degree in English Honours.

Last extracted: May 09, 2017 02:02:36 PM

Current Students

s