Academic Calendar Winter/Summer 2018

Geography


English language proficiency requirements

Students registering in post-secondary level courses (numbered 100 to 499) will be required to meet the English language entrance proficiency requirements. Students in ELS or the University Foundations programs can register in those courses identified in the University Foundations program with lower levels of language proficiency.

Please note that not all courses are offered every semester.

GEOG 103

4 credits

The Physical Environment

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course explores, through a scientific and quantitative framework, how physical processes shape the natural environment. It focuses on the interconnected processes of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Impacts of human activities on the natural environment are also discussed.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 101 or GEOG 102 cannot take this course for further credit.

GEOG 105

3 credits

Natural Hazards and Hollywood

Prerequisite(s): None

This course will consider the science, evolution, human preparedness, and the management of recovery from natural hazards (hurricanes, earthquakes, and diseases). In part this information will be used to assess how accurately film and television portray the science, preparedness, and response to these events.

GEOG 109

3 credits

A World of Development

Prerequisite(s): None.

An introduction to the processes and practices of development in global and local contexts. Examples from around the world are used to illustrate both “natural” and planned development activities and their consequences. Students will learn to critically assess and apply various development approaches and methods.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

Note: This course is offered as GDS 100 and GEOG 109. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 111

3 credits

Environmental Issues and Strategies

Prerequisite(s): None.

Contemporary environmental challenges in a global and local context. Students use citizen science and geographic methods to design a local environmental research project and identify strategies for adaptation. Please refer to the Department of Geography website for out-of-class field trip scheduling information.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 116

4 credits

Earth Rocks

Prerequisite(s): None.

An introduction to physical geology that explores the materials that compose the Earth and the processes that operate to form the Earth and its surface. Topics include minerals, rocks, earth resources, plate tectonics, geophysical hazards, and surficial features.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 117

3 credits

Dinosaurs

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course will investigate the role that the historical geography and geology had on the rise, evolution, and fall of dinosaurs during the Mesozoic (252 million to 65 million years ago).

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 130

3 credits

Geography of Canada

Prerequisite(s): None

This introduction to Canadian geography examines Canada as a set of distinct physical and political regions and as a multicultural and colonized space. The course combines knowledge of physical and human patterns and processes with analysis of current Canadian issues.

GEOG 131

3 credits

British Columbia

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course examines the physical, cultural, economic, and settlement landscapes of British Columbia, using the concepts and methods of regional geographic analysis. Topics include the physiographic and climatic character of the province, Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian resettlement patterns, the staples resource economy, environmental change, Indigenous land rights, and cultural, social, and economic change in an age of globalization. Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to the Department of Geography website for scheduling information.

GEOG 140

3 credits

Human Geography

Prerequisite(s): None

This is a broad survey course of human geography applying the concepts and tools of the discipline to the regions, societies, and landscapes that result from the interaction between humans and their environment and cultural, economic, social, and political landscapes. Field trips outside of class time are required

GEOG 201

4 credits

Climate and People

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 101, GEOG 102, GEOG 103, or GEOG 116.

An exploration of the physical processes responsible for determining Earth’s weather and climate. This exploration will include the human dimension of weather and climate phenomena.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 202

4 credits

Understanding Your Earth: Landforms and Processes

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 102 or GEOG 103 or GEOG 116.

This course will describe and explain the geomorphic processes that result in the origin, evolution, morphology, and distribution of landforms in British Columbia and elsewhere. Practical geographic skills will be developed in field and laboratory settings.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 211

3 credits

Environmental Science

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 101 or 102; or any first-year science course in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics.

From a physical geography perspective, this course introduces the science underlying contemporary environmental problems. Application of the scientific method to case studies of environmental issues will highlight challenges and possible solutions at local, regional, and national scales, while exploring the interface between science, politics, and popular perceptions. A field trip outside of class time is required.

GEOG 219

4 credits

Biogeography

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: AGRI 163, BIO 105, BIO 106, BIO 111, CHEM 105, CHEM 110, CHEM 113, CHEM 150, GEOG 101, GEOG 102, GEOG 103, GEOG 116, PHYS 100, PHYS 101, PHYS 105, or PHYS 111.

Biogeography integrates geography, biology, geology, paleontology, and ecology. Learn how biogeographers study species distribution, track continental drift, and use fossils to help understand evolutionary changes in flora and fauna through geologic time.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.
Note: This course is offered as GEOG 219 (formerly GEOG 317) and BIO 219 (formerly BIO 317). Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 233

3 credits

Geography of Selected Regions

Prerequisite(s): None

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the regional geography of a major world region. Subject matter will be drawn from physical and human geography, with an emphasis placed on human-environment interactions, and the development of distinct cultural, economic, and social landscapes. Field trips outside of class time may be required.

GEOG 240

3 credits

World Regional Geography

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course provides students with a broad overview of the physical and cultural characteristics of different regions of the world, using the concepts and tools of geography. In light of debates over the merits of globalization, this course also considers how human/environment relationships and cultural and economic landscapes are changing due to increasing technological and economic interconnections between the world’s peoples and cultures.

GEOG 241

3 credits

Social Geography: The Urban Experience

Prerequisite(s): None.

An introduction to geographical interrelationships between society, spatial change, and intercultural processes within urban environments. Selected themes may include experiences of refugees, vulnerable children, racial minorities, and immigrants and their experiences in the urban realm.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 242

3 credits

Economic Geography

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: AGRI 142, BUS 100, ECON 100, ECON 101, GDS 100, GEOG 111, or GEOG 140.

Concepts and methods of economic geography. Focus on the spatial distribution of and interactions between natural resources and energy, manufacturing, and services in the capitalist economy. Additional consideration of geographies of innovations, competition, and inequality, and of firm location decisions.

Note: This course is offered as GEOG 242 and ECON 242. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 250

3 credits

Geographic Skills for the Workplace

Prerequisite(s): None

This course will introduce students to various methods applicable and useful in the geography program and in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on spatial visualization and map production, data analysis, and report writing skills. Students will learn about the relevance and significance of these methods for addressing geographical problems. In addition, students will be introduced to professional geographers and potential employment settings to understand how knowledge of geography helps them in their work. Resume writing, interview skills, and career expectations will also be addressed. Field trips outside of class time are required.

GEOG 252

4 credits

Explanation in Geography: Quantitative Methods

Pre- or corequisite(s): One of STAT 104 (formerly MATH 104), STAT 106 (formerly MATH 106), or PSYC 110

This course focuses on the use of numbers as an aid to problem-solving in geographical analysis. Students will be introduced to methods in the collection, description, analysis, and presentation of quantitative data. Techniques in the collection and recording of primary and secondary data will be covered and methods of statistical description, inference, and display will be surveyed. This course makes extensive use of computer software. Students are advised to take this course during the same academic year as GEOG 253 and/or GEOG 250, due to the complementarity that exists in these second year techniques courses.

GEOG 253

4 credits

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Prerequisite(s): None.

This course explores how to manage, map, and analyze information related to our world using a geographic information system (GIS). Emphasis is on concepts and software techniques used to manipulate data and examine problems from a variety of subject areas.

GEOG 257

3 credits

Environment: Science and Communications

Prerequisite(s): One of: CMNS 125, CMNS 155, CMNS 175, or ENGL 105; plus GEOG 103 or any first-year lab science course.

Environmental science and communications, while different fields, are both essential for addressing contemporary environmental problems. This course, team-taught by faculty in Geography and Communications, introduces the student to the methods of scientific inquiry, and the principles of effective communication in environmental science. Application of the scientific method to case studies of environmental issues will highlight challenges and possible solutions at local, regional, and national scales, while exploring the interface between science, politics, and popular perceptions. Specific consideration will be given to developing strategies for communicating with various audiences, including stakeholder groups, other scientists, policy makers, and the general public. A field trip outside of class time may be required. Please refer to the Department of Geography website for scheduling information.

Note: Students with credit for GEOG 211 may not take GEOG 257/CMNS 257 for further credit.

GEOG 270

5 credits

Field Techniques in Geography and the Environment

Prerequisite(s): 6 credits of 100/200 level Geography.

A field-based introduction to a variety of tools and techniques used by geographers to describe and analyze the physical and cultural landscape, and human-environment relationships. Students will complete library and field research related to a specific area of interest. This course is offered as an independent study and may, with instructor permission, be completed as part of a study tour or Adventures in Geography field excursion.

Note: This course will be offered under different letter designations (e.g. C-Z) representing different topics. This course may be repeated for credit provided the letter designation differs.

GEOG 300

4 credits

Special Topics in Geography

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

An opportunity to explore a topic or subfield in a new and significant area of geographical research and scholarship. Topics will be chosen from a wide range of physical, human, regional, and technical areas in geography.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to department website for field trip scheduling information
.
Note: This course will be offered under different letter designations (e.g. C-Z) representing different topics. This course may be repeated for credit provided the letter designation differs.

GEOG 302

4 credits

River Geomorphology

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 201 or GEOG 202.

This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the processes responsible for shaping the river environment and the landforms that result from them. Emphasis is placed on understanding the theoretical basis of river geomorphology and the identification and formative processes of these landforms.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 303

4 credits

Environmental Hydrology

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 201, GEOG 202, or GEOG 219/BIO 219.

This course will investigate hydrological processes, the impact of climate change on the hydrological cycle, water resource management and concerns of water quality. The impact of human use on the hydrology of a region will be addressed.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 304

4 credits

Coasts and Climate Change

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 201, GEOG 202, or GEOG 219/BIO 219.

The coastal zone represents one of the most dynamic and complex environments on the earth’s surface. This course will investigate the complex interactions between people, coastal processes and landform zones in times of environmental change and sea-level rise.

Note: Field trips outside of regular class times may be required. Please refer to the department website for scheduling information.

GEOG 307

4 credits

Climates of Cities

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

An exploration of the climatic effects of urbanization with a focus on the collection and analysis of urban climate data. Human-weather interaction in the urban setting including the degradation of the urban atmosphere and potential mitigation techniques are investigated.

GEOG 308

4 credits

Climate Change and Variability

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 201, GEOG 219/BIO 219, or 45 university-level credits. Note: As of January 2018, prerequisites will change to: 45 university-level credits.

This course investigates the causes and characteristics of regional and global climate change and variability. The significance of understanding past climates and their reconstruction is addressed. Environmental and socio-economic impacts of climate change, policy responses to climate change, and mitigation and adaptation strategies are examined.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 401 cannot take this course for further credit.

GEOG 311

4 credits

Global Resources and the Environment

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: AGRI 204, AGRI 247, AGRI 272, AGRI 371, GEOG 211, GEOG 219, GEOG 240, GEOG 242, GEOG 257/CMNS 257, BIO 210, BIO 219, ECON 100, ECON 101, IPK 331, IPK 344, IPK 386, PACS 210, or PACS 310.

Investigation of relationships between communities, markets, and the environment in the management of natural resources. Consideration of how global markets influence spatial patterns of energy and resource development, the use of common pool resources, environmental assessment, and sustainable planning principles.

GEOG 312

4 credits

Political Ecology

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

Examining the way social and political factors influence human interaction with the environment, and unequal distribution of natural resource wealth. Case studies investigate environmental change, worldviews, livelihoods, conservation, conflict, and indigenous access to resources. Field trips outside class time are required.

GEOG 313

4 credits

Agriculture and Rural Life

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits to include one of: SOC/ANTH/MACS 255, GEOG 252,
CRIM 220 or equivalent.

Agriculture is essential to our well-being, and yet for the majority it is easy to separate this fact from our day to day lives. For those who live in rural areas, however, the features of agriculture and rural life are often inseparable. Fertilizer in the ground water, agricultural noise pollution, housing development, seasonal workers—these are just a few of the issues for exploration under the topic of agriculture and rural life. This course is an applied introduction to agriculture and rural life in the North America context, with students conducting their own primary research on a subject of relevance to the course and under guidance of the instructor. Class time will be spent learning about a specific case study or studies related to agriculture and rural life, and discussing practical and theoretical aspects of conducting a research project.

Note: This course is offered as SOC 313 and GEOG 313. Students may take only one of these for credit. Students who have taken SOC 358C cannot take SOC 313 and GEOG 313 for further credit.

GEOG 314

4 credits

Geography of Food

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

Food is used as a lens through which global relationships between nature and culture are explored. Topics include the geography of food production and food security. Characteristics of diverse culinary cultures are explored and culinary cultural norms and biases identified.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.
Note: Students with credit for GEOG 443 cannot take this course for further credit.

GEOG 315

4 credits

Soilscapes

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: AGRI 204, AGRI 220, BIO 201, BIO 202, BIO 203, BIO 210, BIO 220, CHEM 213, CHEM 214, CHEM 221, CHEM 241, GEOG 201, GEOG 202, GEOG 211, GEOG 219/BIO 219, GEOG 252, GEOG 253 or GEOG 257/CMNS 257.

Soils result from the interface of bedrock and biota regulated by climate. In this course students will learn how soils vary along environmental gradients across the landscape according to physical, chemical, and ecological processes that define key soil horizons.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 318

4 credits

Water Resources Management

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 201, GEOG 202, GEOG 211, GEOG 219, GEOG 257/CMNS 257, or GEOG 311.

This course examines the issues surrounding water as a global resource and the scientific principles involved in water resources management. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the role that water as a resource has within our societies, including our perception of water as a resource, contamination of water, treatment of water, and possible impacts on water supply resulting from climate change. Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 319

4 credits

Swamps and Bogs

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: AGRI 204, AGRI 220, BIO 201, BIO 202, BIO 203, BIO 210, BIO 220, CHEM 213, CHEM 214, CHEM 221, CHEM 241, GEOG 201, GEOG 202, GEOG 211, GEOG 219/BIO 219, GEOG 252, GEOG 253, or GEOG 257/CMNS 257.

Swamps, bogs, and other types of wetlands provide essential ecosystem functions to watersheds that support them. Using hydrology, soils, and vegetation, students will learn how to delineate wetland boundaries and assess biogeochemical cycling along environmental gradients.
Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

Note: This course is offered as GEOG 319 (formerly GEOG 417) and BIO 319 (formerly BIO 417). Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 323

4 credits

Geography of War, Terrorism, and Peace

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits, or one of: GEOG 240, GEOG 242, CRIM 214C, POSC 230, or POSC 260 (formerly POSC 190).

This course in geopolitics focuses on how space and place shapes, and is shaped by, terrorism and war. The focus is on conflict emerging from and after the Cold War, and in particular on geographies of conflict between 1991 and today. Topics include the diffusion and globalization of war and terrorism; gendered, ethnic, and religious spaces of conflict; the surveillance of and conflict in urban settings; the role of natural resources (oil, minerals, and drugs) in war; the ecological impacts of war; and landscapes of peace, remembrance, and post-war recovery. Field trips outside of class time may be required. Refer to the Department of Geography website for field trip information.

Note: Students with credit for GEOG 300C may not take GEOG 323 for further credit.

GEOG 335

4 credits

Methods in Freshwater Ecology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210 or GEOG 202

This course explores the biological, chemical, and physical features of lakes, rivers, and streams. These features are related to general ecological concepts and environmental concerns. The course focuses on the invertebrate and fish communities, but includes the origin and nature of lake and stream systems and the fundamentals of surface water chemistry and physics. Theoretical approaches and practical techniques will be addressed. This course includes considerable field work using local rivers and streams as well as outside fieldtrips. The laboratory introduces you to a variety of aquatic ecosystems and species and relevant sampling procedures and equipment. After completion of the course students will be competent to utilize various methods to critically evaluate freshwater systems and to conduct research in freshwater ecology.

Note: This course is offered as BIO 335 and GEOG 335. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 340

4 credits

Geographies of Poverty and Development

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

This course uses an interdisciplinary framework to critically examine diverse approaches to implementing socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable development initiatives, in Canada and internationally, with emphases on the environment, food security, natural resources, climate change, and community participation.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required.

Note: This course is offered as GEOG 340 and GDS 340. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 344

4 credits

Geography of Urban Development

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 240, GEOG 241, or GEOG 242.

This course applies the principles of urban geographical analysis to the study of urbanization as exemplified in the development of North American cities in a global context.

GEOG 346

4 credits

Geography of Religion and Peacebuilding

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

The influence of religion on intercultural practices, built and natural environments, territory, conflict, and peace is examined. Consideration is given to deconstructing belief systems to understand their role in the nexus of human rights, migration, identity, development, and peacebuilding.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 353

4 credits

GIS Applications

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 253. Recommended: a 100-level COMP course and GEOG 252.

This course focuses on the use of Geographic Information Science in problem-solving and decision-making in real world settings. Designed to complement GEOG 253, Introduction to GIS, students will be introduced to additional GIScience techniques and how to use them in a variety of applications.

GEOG 354

4 credits

Approaches in Human Geography

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 241 or GEOG 242

Human geography has a long intellectual history and is consequently characterized by a wide variety of philosophical and methodological approaches, each a reflection of both wider societal currents and the choices geographers make in doing applied and theoretical work. This course introduces the critical conceptual elements in each of these approaches and situates, evaluates, and tests them in the context of concrete geographical research.

GEOG 360

4 credits

Introduction to Regional and Community Planning

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

Concepts in the field of planning and current policy issues and debates are addressed. Partnering with a local agency, students work on addressing a planning challenge that introduces them to careers in development policy, local government, and registered professional planning.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 361

3 credits

Environmental Economics

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits including ECON 100 and ECON 101.

This course explores the proper role of government regulation regarding the environment. Students will study the economic framework used to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental policies. This framework will be used to evaluate various applied policy questions, including: What is the relationship between economic growth and environment quality? How much pollution should there be? What are the costs of climate change? Are we running out of resources?

Note: This course is offered as ECON 361 and GEOG 361. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 362

4 credits

Geography of Tourism and Recreation

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

Introduction to tourism and recreation systems from a geographic perspective. Use of applied and critical approaches to study of spatial patterns of and impacts resulting from tourism and recreation activities, both locally and globally.

Note: Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 364

4 credits

International Planning and Development Policy: Adapting to Climate Change

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

nternational development strategies within the context of climate change are discussed. Focus on consequences of policy on societal systems and marginalized groups, including transportation and housing, agriculture and energy production, and ecological systems in which humans interact.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 396

6 credits

Canada Internship

Prerequisite(s): 60 university-level credits, instructor’s permission, and department head’s permission.

This course provides a Canadian experiential learning opportunity for students to apply their classroom learning in a workplace setting under the supervision of a vetted business, government agency, or NGO.

Note: This course is offered as GEOG 396, SOC 396 and GDS 310. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 398

6 credits

International Internship

Prerequisite(s): 60 university-level credits, instructor’s permission, and department head’s permission.

This course provides an international experiential learning opportunity for students to apply their classroom learning in a workplace setting under the supervision of a vetted business, government agency, or NGO.

Note: This course is offered as GEOG 398, GDS 311, and SOC 398 Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 400

4 credits

Advanced Topics in Geography

Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, including four credits of 300- or 400-level geography courses

This course provides students with an opportunity to conduct advanced field research in a subfield in a significant area of geographical scholarship. Topics will be chosen from a wide range of physical, human, regional, and technical areas in geography, and will build on programming and learning at the 300-level. The course often runs as an Independent Studies. Topics include Dendrochronology, Luminescence Dating, and Sustainable Development, among others.
Note: The special topic is denoted with a letter designation (e.g. GEOG 400J). Students may take GEOG 400 as many times as they wish, but will not receive credit for the same letter designation more than once.

GEOG 402

4 credits

Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 302, GEOG 304, or (GEOG 202 with a grade of B or better).

This course will examine selected aspects of stratigraphy, geomorphology, glacial geology, and long-term climate history of the Quaternary Period. Glacial and fluvial sedimentary models introduced in GEOG 202 and GEOG 302 will be reviewed. Regional emphasis will be placed on southwestern British Columbia and adjacent regions.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 410

4 credits

Plant Ecology

Prerequisite(s): BIO 210 or GEOG 219/BIO 219 (formerly GEOG 317/BIO 317).

This course provides students with an understanding of factors, biotic and abiotic, responsible for vegetation distribution patterns across landscapes. In particular, lectures will address plants at the individual, population, and community levels and demonstrate how plants interact with their physical environment – soils, water, and climate. Field trips and laboratory exercises will introduce methodologies of vegetation sampling, analysis, and interpretation. Field trips outside of class time are required.

Note: This course is offered as both BIO 410 and GEOG 410. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 411

4 credits

Advanced Topics in Environmental Issues

Prerequisite(s): At least 8 credits of 300-400 level Geography

This course provides students the opportunity to explore topics and issues of environmental concern from a geographical perspective. Emphasis will be placed on seminar discussions, field trips, and case studies. Field trips outside of class time are required.

GEOG 412

4 credits

Environmental Geography Practicum

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 252, GEOG 253, 8 credits of 300/400-level Geography, and permission of instructor and department head.

This course enables students to integrate applied practical experience and training into their academic studies in environmental geography. Students will participate in up to a semester-long practicum that will provide them with the opportunity to build upon their skills in a supervised and usually unpaid work experience in environmental practice with an employer or institution.

Note: Before initiating practicum placements, students must sign a practicum agreement.

GEOG 419

4 credits

Paleoecology

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 302, GEOG 303, GEOG 304, GEOG 307, GEOG 308, GEOG 315, GEOG 319/BIO 319, GEOG 335, BIO 301, BIO 305, BIO 306, BIO 307, BIO 308, BIO 310, BIO 330, BIO 335, BIO 340, BIO 360, or BIO 370.

Paleoecology is the study of past environments through the use of fossils, geochemistry, and radiometric dating. During this course students will learn how to reconstruct past environmental change driven by climate, sea-level change, earthquakes, floods, and fire.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.
Note: This course is offered as GEOG 419 and BIO 419. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 421

4 credits

Borderlands

Prerequisite(s): 60 credits including four credits of 300/400-level Geography courses.

This course studies the geographical character of the Fraser Lowland cross-border region (CBR) and is set within the wider literature on Borderlands. The course is usually taught in conjunction with the Environmental Studies Department at Western Washington University (WWU), and the class consists of students from both UFV and WWU. Extensive travel in the area of the Fraser Lowland, as well as to WWU, is required. Please refer to department website for field trip scheduling information. This course is often offered in an independent studies format.

GEOG 433

4 credits

Advanced Geography of a Selected Region

Prerequisite(s): 60 credits, including four credits of 300/400-level Geography.

Regional study is one of the foundational approaches in the discipline of geography. This course allows for the advanced study of the physical, demographic, cultural, economic, and political geography of a selected region. This course is also intended to serve as a capstone course for geography students, integrating concepts introduced in foundational human and physical geography courses. Individual regions are denoted with a letter designation (e.g. GEOF 433I: South Asia). Students cannot repeat the same version of GEOG 433 (e.g. two GEOG 433I offerings) for credit. Field trips outside of class time may be required. Please refer to department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 440

4 credits

Advanced Research Topics in Urban Geography

Prerequisite(s): 60 university-level credits, including at least 6 credits in Geography, Anthropology, Business, History, Sociology, or Political Science.

Advanced research and analysis on a specific topic in urban geography. The topic selected by the course instructor will be publicized in the semester prior to the start of the course.

GEOG 447

4 credits

Aboriginal Geography

Prerequisite(s): 60 credit hours including 4 credits of upper-level Geography or instructor’s permission

Using geographical models and methods of analysis, this course will explore the different human geographies created by, and the various geographical imaginations of, aboriginal, indigenous, and/or non-western peoples and cultures before, during, and after contact with Europe. Field trips outside of class time are required.

GEOG 452

4 credits

Advanced Field Methods and Techniques

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 252; GEOG 250 or GEOG 253; and a minimum of 60 university-level credits.

In this course, students apply concepts and techniques acquired in previous human and physical geography courses to research problems in the field. Working both in the classroom and in field sites in Southwest B.C., students will define and formulate research questions, collect and analyze appropriate data, and design and write formal research reports on their findings. The course is offered in multiple versions, with each version addressing a specific issue area, e.g. natural hazards risk along the Sea-to-Sky corridor; environmental history and landscape change in the Fraser Valley; etc. Multiple field trips outside of classroom time will be required. Please refer to department website for field trip scheduling information.

GEOG 453

4 credits

Remote Sensing of the Environment

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 353.

Remote sensing is the art and science of studying Earth features from a distance. Students will learn the principles of remote sensing science and the characteristics of imagery collected from aircraft and satellite sensors. Students will use remote sensing to interpret and map geologic, hydrologic, vegetative, and urban features.

GEOG 454

4 credits

Geospatial Data Analysis Modeling

Prerequisite(s): (One of the following: STAT 104 [formerly MATH 104] or STAT 106 [formerly MATH 106]) and (one of the following: COMP 120, COMP 150, COMP 152, or COMP 155) and GEOG 353. Note: GEOG 453 is recommended.

Advanced course focusing on the theory and method of using geospatial data to model, analyze, and solve real-world problems. Introduction to methods of enhancing and classifying remotely sensed data, using advanced spatial analysis techniques, model building, and scripting in GIS.

GEOG 458

4 credits

GIS Project

Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 23 credits of the GIS certificate completed, and permission of the instructor.

In this capstone course of the GIS certificate program, a student will initiate, design, implement, and manage a GIS project in consultation with the instructor. The project can either be done independently or as a part of a cooperative project. Course emphasis is on consolidating and demonstrating the skills the student has acquired during the certificate program and on preparing the student for professional employment in GIS.

GEOG 460

4 credits

Practicum in Planning

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 252, GEOG 253, and (one of GEOG 360, GEOG 364, or GEOG 464), and permission of instructor and department head.

Practicum students will work under the supervision of a professional planner. This practicum presents students with the opportunity to apply techniques and methods as well as create contacts with practicing planners useful for future employment and/or graduate school applications.

Note: Before initiating practicum placements, students must sign a practicum agreement. UFV reserves the right not to place a student into a practicum if, in the opinion of the faculty, the student is not ready to be placed.

GEOG 464

4 credits

Community Planning and Development: Local Applied Studio

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

Introduction to planning practice, from problem definition to data collection, analysis, drafting of a design concept, and participating in a client presentation. Through the application of planning theory and design techniques, students will study urban precedents and critically consider alternatives for a local planning challenge.

Note: Field trips outside of class time will be required. Please refer to the department website for field trip scheduling information.
Note: This course is offered as GEOG 464 and GD 464. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 466

5 credits

Community Planning and Development: International Studio

Prerequisite(s): 45 university-level credits.

Introduction to planning practice, from problem definition to data collection, analysis, drafting of a design concept, and participating in a client presentation. Through the application of planning theory and design techniques, students will study urban precedents and critically consider alternatives for an international planning challenge.

Note: This course is offered as GEOG 466 and GD 466. Students may take only one of these for credit.

GEOG 470

5 credits

Advanced Field Studies in Geography

Prerequisite(s): 60 credits including GEOG 250 or 253, and at least 4 credits of upper-level Geography; application to an acceptance in study tour or field school.

In this capstone course of intensive field study, students will apply concepts and techniques attained in their previous human and physical geography courses to the study of a region outside of Southwest British Columbia. Students will define and formulate research questions, collect and analyze appropriate data from primary and secondary sources, and communicate their findings for both academic and general audiences. Classroom meetings and independent research completed before and after field study are required. GEOG 470 is offered in multiple versions as part of study tours and Adventures in Geography (AIG) field excursions. Please refer to department website for dates and locations of study tours and AIGs.

GEOG 480

4 credits

Directed Readings

Prerequisite(s): Written consent of supervising faculty member and department head

This directed readings course is designed for upper-level Geography students who wish to advance their knowledge and research skills using secondary materials in a subject area of their choosing. It can be used to further study of interests developed through earlier coursework or to satisfy a specialization in a study tour or Adventure in Geography field school. Course content and approach is determined in consultation with the guiding instructor.

GEOG 482

2 credits

Directed Readings

Prerequisite(s): Written consent of supervising faculty member and department head.

This directed research course is designed for upper-level Geography students who wish to advance their knowledge and skills using secondary materials in a subject area of their choosing. It can be used to further the development of interests acquired in earlier coursework or to satisfy a specialization in a study tour or Adventure in Geography field school. Course content and approach is determined in consultation with the guiding instructor.

GEOG 483

3 credits

Directed Readings

Prerequisite(s): Written consent of supervising faculty member and department head.

This directed research course is designed for upper-level Geography students who wish to advance their knowledge and skills using secondary materials in a subject area of their choosing. It can be used to further the development of interests acquired in earlier coursework or to satisfy a specialization in a study tour or Adventure in Geography field school. Course content and approach is determined in consultation with the guiding instructor.

GEOG 484

4 credits

Directed Studies

Prerequisite(s): Written consent of supervising faculty member and department head

This directed research course is designed for upper-level Geography students who wish to advance their knowledge and skills in a subject area of their choosing. It can be used to further development of interests acquired in earlier coursework or to satisfy a specialization in a study tour or Adventure in Geography field school. Course content and approach is determined in consultation with the guiding instructor.

GEOG 491

4 credits

Honours Research Design and Data Collection

Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in the Geography Honours or Physical Geography Honours program, completion of at least 12 upper-level Geography credits, and instructor’s permission.

This course is designed for students completing a two-semester research project for the Geography Honours program. Each student will work with a faculty supervisor to identify the topic and scope of this research. GEOG 491 will consist of instruction in primary and secondary research techniques, research design, and the collection of data required to complete this project. Compilation, analysis, and presentation of this research will be completed in GEOG 492 (BA students) or GEOG 493 (BSc students).

GEOG 492

4 credits

Honours Research Project

Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Honours Geography (Bachelor of Arts) program, (GEOG 491 or one of the following: GEOG 396, GEOG 398, GEOG 400G, GEOG 400J, GEOG 402, GEOG 410, 419, GEOG 440, or GEOG 458), and instructor’s permission.

In this course, an Honours student will demonstrate advanced library and field data collection and interpretation, and written and visual analysis in a particular geographic subject area. Upon completion of the project's written component, the student will be required to present their research in a public venue.

GEOG 493

4 credits

Honours Research Project in Physical Geography/ GIS

Prerequisite(s): Enrolment in the Physical Geography Honours program; GEOG 491 or one of GEOG 400G, GEOG 400J,GEOG 402, GEOG 410, GEOG 417, or GEOG 458; and instructor’s permission.

This course is devoted to the completion of a Physical Geography Honours project, building on a research completed in a previous semester as part of GEOG 491 or an equivalent third-year internship or fourth-year research-intensive course approved by the department. The results of research will be written as a thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will be required to present their research at an appropriate student research forum or conference.

Last extracted: November 07, 2017 03:02:22 PM

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