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Linus Chiang

Linus Chiang

Assistant Professor

Chemistry

Abbotsford campus, B332

Phone: 604-504-7441 ext. 4432

email Linus

Biography

Linus graduated from Simon Fraser University (SFU) with his B.Sc. in 2009, then completed his Ph.D studies with Prof. Tim Storr at SFU in 2014. He then moved to sunny California for his postdoctoral studies with Prof. T. Daniel P. Stack at Stanford University studying Cu-containing enzymatic models. He joined the chemistry department at the University of the Fraser Valley in 2016, where his inorganic chemistry research program focuses on bio-inspired catalyst design for alternative fuel production. Interested students are encouraged to contact him directly by email!

Education

Ph.D in Bioinorganic Chemistry (SFU, 2014). Supervisor: Prof. Tim Storr

B.Sc. in Chemistry (SFU, 2009)

Research Experience:

2016 – Current: Assistant Professor of Chemistry, UFV

2014 – 2016: Postdoctoral research with Professor T. Daniel P. Stack, Stanford University

Focus: Cu/O2 enzymatic models

2009 – 2014: Graduate research with Professor Tim Storr, Simon Fraser University

Focus: Redox-active ligand containing transition metal complexes

2011, 2013: Exchange scholar with Professor Fabrice Thomas, Universite Grenoble-Alpes

2008 – 2009: Honors thesis research with Prof. Peter Wilson, Simon Fraser University

Focus: Towards the total synthesis of Yaequinolone J1 and J2

Teaching Interests

Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 221, 320, 325)

Bioinorganic Chemistry (CHEM 451)

Research Interests

Keywords: Bioinorganic Chemistry, catalyst design, coordination chemistry, density functional theory (DFT), homogenous/heterogeneous catalysis, alternative fuels production

My research program will revolve around investigating the sustainable generation of renewable fuels catalyzed by inorganic coordination compounds. Inspired by enzymes such as [FeFe]-hydrogenase and photosystems, we will design inorganic coordination model complexes that catalyzes alternative fuels (i.e. hydrogen) production under reducing conditions. These compounds can be tuned through systematic electronic or structural modifications, and the required reducing equivalents will come from an electrochemical or photochemical source, where the latter represents a key goal of this work: To generate alternative fuels, such as H2, using the most abundant energy source on our planet.

Interested students are encouraged to contact me directly at Linus.Chiang@ufv.ca!

Publications

Select Publications:

1.    Chiang, L., Keown, W., Citek, C., Wasinger, E. C., Stack, T. D. P. (2016) “Simplest Monodentate Imidazole Stabilization of the oxy-Tyrosinase Cu2O2 Core; Phenolate Hydroxylation through a Cu(III) Intermediate,” Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., DOI: 10.1002/anie.201605159

2.    Chiang, L., Clarke, R. M., Herasymchuk, K., Sutherland, M., Prosser, K., Shimazaki, Y., Storr, T. (2015) “Electronic Structure Evaluation of an Oxidized Tris(Methoxy)-substituted Ni Salen Complex,” Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 1, 49 – 55.

3.    Chiang, L., Herasymchuk, K., Thomas, F., Storr, T. (2015) “Influence of Electron-Withdrawing Substituents on the Electronic Structure of Oxidized Ni and Cu Salen Complexes,” Inorg. Chem. 54, 12, 5970 – 5980.

4.    Chiang, L., Savard, D., Shimazaki, Y., Thomas, F., Storr, T. (2014) “FeIII Bipyrrolidine Phenoxide Complexes and Their Oxidized Analogues,” Inorg. Chem. 11, 5810 – 5819.

5.    Chiang, L., Allan, L. E. N., Alcantara, J., Wang, M. C. P., Storr, T., Shaver, M. P. (2014) “Tuning Ligand Electronics and Peripheral Substitution on Cobalt Salen Complexes: Structure and Polymerization Activity,” Dalton Trans. 43, 4295 – 4304.

6.    Chiang, L., Kochem, A., Jarjayes, O., Dunn, T. J., Vezin, H., Sakaguchi, M., Ogura, T., Orio, M., Shimazaki, Y., Thomas, F., Storr, T. (2012) “Radical Localization in a Series of Symmetric Ni(II) Compelxes with Oxidized Salen Ligands,” Chem. Eur. J. 44, 14117 – 14127.

7.    Chiang, L., Jones, M. R., Ferreira, C. L., Storr, T. (2012) “Multifunctional Ligands in Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry – Current Trends and Future Directions,” Curr. Top. Med. Chem. 12, 122 – 144.

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